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Flash From The Past - 1918

The Farmer-Herald
April 5, 1918
transcribed and contributed by RITA

AUTO ACCIDENT
 -——--——-
Freight Train Crashes Into Auto Containing Five Passengers
 -——--——-
The Driver Cut About Face, While
Others Are Badly Shocked

The automobile of Julius Krause, in which were Mr. and Mrs, Krause and their two small children, and Mr.. Krause’s brother, was hit by a freight train at the crossing at the foot of the hill on Manufacturers street Monday afternoon about two o'clock and badly wrecked. Mr. Krause was quite severely cut about the face by broken glass from the wind shield, while the others escaped bodily injury, but were more or less shocked.

The car was being driven by Mr. Krause and had nearly reached tthe foot of the hill when he heard a train coming down the switch, but as the elevator of the Dodge-Hooker Co. shielded the train from observation he was unable to locate it exactly. He reversed his engine and tried to stop the auto, but the momentum it had attained 30mg down hill carried it  onto the railway track where it was instantly caught by a flat car which was being backed into the yard of that Falls Mfg. Co.

The auto was carried about thirty feet when the railway train stopped and the passengers were extricated from the wrecked vehicle.

The end of the flat car caught and crushed the auto and practically ruined it. Mr. Krause and his brother, who were riding on the front seat managed to climb over the back where Mrs Krause and the children were and thus escaped greater injury than they received. A view of the wrecked car, however, makes the observer reported wonder how it was possible for any of those who were in it to escape being crushed to death, for the cab is twisted out of shape and crushed in, while the chasis is completely wrecked.


FROM SOMEWHERE IN SUNNY FRANCE
——————
Earl Volk,
——————
Member ofaUnited States Aviation Corps, Writes His Mother
——————
Not Permitted to Mention Localities -or State Definite Movements.
——————
Somewhere in France.
Feb. 19, 1918.
(World War I)

Dear Ones All:
 
Well I am writing some letters today, so will drop you a few lines to let you know all is 0.K.

I was in the city Saturday evening and Sunday. Had a good time and it was a rest to get away from camp. It is the first time I have been away since the first of January.

Last night was a little cold. It froze ice about three-fourths of an inch thick. There was a heavy frost. Some difference from there isn’t it? Gee, I don’t believe I want to see much more of such weather. Ha! ha! Hope it has been warmer there this month than last.

I was on duty Monday and am off until tomorrow morning at 7 a.m. then on for 24 hours and off 48 hours. I like my work all 0.K. only it will take time to learn and make a rating. I can boil the water now and only burn it a little.

Want to write» to Emory, Ray and the rest if I ever get around to it. Gee! it is hard to write on account of giving news out. I suppose things have changed some in the Falls since I left there but guess I would know the place. Ha! ha!

Did a washing this afternoon, so am all 0.K. for a day or so. I wash to beat the “band” now. Will close now hoping this will find you well, and don’t worry for we are all 0.K. and will be.

Love to all.
EARL S. VOLK,
S, C. 4th, U. S. M.,
Aviation Force, France.
Via. New York
.

KILLED IN PARIS CHURCH

Former Oconto Resident Victim Long
Range German Gun
——————
IN SHELL STRUCK CHURCH 
——————
Miss Emma Mullen, Sister E. G. Mullen in Church Hit by 72 Mile Gun
——————
Paris - Miss Emma G. Mullen of New York was killed in the church which was struck by a German shell On Good Friday. She was the fifth American killed in the church.

Miss Mullen was born at Fox Lake, Wis, in 1881, and came to Europe in May of last year as buyer for a New York firm.

The body of Miss Mullen’s secretary, Mademoiselle Madeline Floch, has been found in the ruins of the church.

Miss Mullen, accompanied by Mademoiselle Floch, left her residence at about 3 p. m. on March 29, Until on Wednesday hope had been entertained that she had merely been injured and perhaps might be in a hospital, unable to send word to her relatives.

The Germans again began to bombard Parts at 9 .50 o clock Wednesday morning, -Mullen was a fomer resident of Oconto and was a sister of E. G. Mullen of this city. Oconto Reporter


WELL KNOWN CO. RESIDENT DEAD
——————
William T. Snyder, a Prosperous Farmer, of Pensaukee
——————
Passed Away March 27 After Brief Illness
——————
William T. Snyder, a prosperous farmer, and influential citizen of Pensaukee, Oconto county, passed away March 27, following a, brief illness.

Deceased was well known to local people having spent a greater part of his life in this community. For many years he was employed on the lakes, having been licensed a captain in 1883, and having officered the John Spry, Thome Spears and Welcome. Of late years he has resided at Oak Orchard at his homestead which was settled by his father in 1850.

Deceased was born on Doty Island, Winnebago county, and was married in 1886 to Miss Hannah Windross of Oak Orchard (Oconto County), and is survived by his widow and four children: William, 40th U. S, Inf., Fort Sheridan, Mrs. M. P. Sawyer, Menominee, Mich., and John and Winifred, both of Oak Orchard.

The floral offerings were numerous and beautiful.

Burial services were held at the home Saturday at 1 o’clock, Rev. E. W. Wright officiating, interment being in the Brookside cemetery.

Donald MacQueen had charge of the funeral.

LITTLE SUAMICO
John Zoeller was a Gleen Bay caller Monday.
Ole Johnson was a Green Bay caller Monday.
David Bowman went to Green Bay Monday.
John Milzarek was a Green Bay caller Monday.
Jake Brandemihl has purchased Aug. Stiller’s car.
Frank Allen, Sr., and Frank Allen, Jr., were Green Bay callers Monday.
R. O. Wedgewood transacted business in Oconto Tuesday.
Mrs. John Wedgewood was a Green Bay caller Tuesday.
Mrs. George Allen was a Green Bay caller Tuesday.
Dr. P. F. Gaunt of Oconto was here Tuesday.
William Ferdon went to Oconto last week.

TOWN OF OCONTO
Mrs. Frank Lemere visited Thursday at the home of Frank Juneau at Lena.
Mr. and Mrs. Felix Earley transacted business at Oconto Tuesday
Mrs. Richard Courtion of Lena spent Monday at the home of Wilfred LaPlant.
Miss Violet Corey, who is teaching school in the town of Lena, spent Saturday and Sunday at her home here.
Joe Allie and son, Norbert, who have been employed at Mountain, during the winter, returned home Tuesday.
Mr, and Mrs. Joe Alberts of Marinette are visiting relatives in our vicinity.
Elsie Pelkey returned to her school duties at Maplewood in Door county, Monday, after spending her Easter vacation at home.
Mr. and Mrs, Frank Naniot, George and Antone Alberta and Mr. and Mrs. Peter Alberts attended the funeral of Miss DeViller at Lena Saturday.
Miss Julia Allie of Mountain is visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Allie.
A large number of the men in this vicinity attended the stock fair at Lena Monday.
Oscar Brown, who had been employed at Mountain during the winter, returned home Saturday night,
Joe Allie and wife spent Sunday evening at the home of John Greenwood at Little River.

KELLEY BROOK
Misses Kate and Rose Manik spent Easter at home.
Mr, and Mrs. Herman Schoenebeck of Suring came down Wednesday to visit Robert Hall, who is recovering from his recent illness.
Victoria and Elna Christenson, who attend high school at Gillett, spent the week end with their parents.
Raymond St. Louis returned from the woods last week,
The Red Cross auxiliary held a very enjoyable meeting at the home of Wm. Hammil Wednesday. The next meeting will be at Rene Kessler’s on April 10th.
John Hubbard has sold his farm to his brother, Ernie. He will hold an auction of farm machinery, etc., Saturday and will move to Montana.
April 19, is the date set for the play, “Blundering Billy” to be given for the benefit of the Red Cross at. Kelley Brook. All are cordially invited to attend,
The “run” of maple sap has been pretty good. The following people have been making syrup: Joe Emond, Paul Burbey, Joe Martineau, Rene Kessler. Ernie Hubbard, Kieffer Bros, B. Kaufman and Tuckers.
Ed Daly has returned Lake Geneva for the, summer.
Melvin Kessler has bought Ernie Hubbard’s farm.
It was reported Monday morning that Rene Kessler was seriously ill.

Marriage License
The following marriage licenses were issued recently by County Clerk H. C. Orr:
Hazel Hickok of Suring to Edward Birr of Morgan.
Antone Bergeron to Anna Nerenhausen, both of Oconto.

New Village Board
The new village board of trustees (Oconto Falls) will be composed of the following gentlemen: J. M. Sladkey, president;
Max Boldt, Frank Trudell and W. E. Siegler, holdovers; George Bonner, A. J. Peterson and Henry Wilson.

YOUNG LADY DEAD
——————
Miss Lena Deviliers Passed Away at Her Home South of Lena
——————
Lena, Wis., April 3, 1918.
Miss Lena Devillers, a well known Lena young lady, passed away at her home south of the village last Thursday evening, after an illness of about two years.

She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A, Dcvillers and was born in Rosier, Wis., in 1896 and came to the town of Lena eight years ago, She leaves to mourn her early demise her parents, seven brothers, Joseph, Charles, William, Owen, Harry, Edward and Eugene, and two sisters, Mrs. A. Haasc and Lucille Devillers.

The funeral was held Saturday morning at 10:30 o’clock from St. Charles’ church, Rev. Fr. Kolbe officiating,  with interment in Catholic cemetery.

The pallbearers were brothers of deceased.

Those from out of town who attended the funeral were Emil Bellin, Mrs. A. Haase, Mayme and Odell Devillers, Mrs. F. Munier and Mrs. J. Manssart of Sawyer, Mrs. J. Devillers of Algoma. Charles Devillers of Green Bay and William Devillers of Oconto Falls.

HUNS MAY ATTACK YANKEES
——————
Troop Movements Behind Lines Increasing

American Patrol Enters Trench and Exchanges Shots.

——————
With the American Army in the Field, April 2 (World War I).—Troop movements behind the German lines are increasing. It was learned that one division moved into the trenches on the Toul front Thursday, but was withdrawn Saturday, presumably going north.

An American patrol entered the German lines three times last night. On one expedition it encountered electrically-charged barbed wires. On another occasion shots were exchanged with the enemy, but the patrol with-drew without casualties.

The Americans are on the alert for a possible attack which may be under preparation by the enemy. Our troops are prepared for defense against German tanks.

GAVE THEIR SERVICES
Rube‘s Orchestra Furished Music for The Minstrels at Shawano Last Night Under direction of Editor Stanley, of the Shawano Journal, a big minstrel show was given at that city last night, the proceeds for the benefit of the Red Cross society. Rube’s 0rchestra of Oconto Falls, furnished the music free, that being part of Manager Maigatter’s donation to the work of the Red Cross. There was a big attendance at the entertainment and the receipts netted a handsome sum, as was to be expected of any affair managed by the music-loving, whole-souled, patriotic and altogether genial editor of the Journal.

S H 0 R T   N 0 T E S
(Oconto Falls)
John Wesner of Oconto, register of deeds, spent Monday Oconto Falls.
County treasurer A. H. Cleveland of Oconto visited his parents and attended the address by Congressman D. G. Classon Monday night.
Paul Riner, Walter Hinnenthal and Otto Lehner came home from the Great Lakes Naval Training Station at Waukegan, Ill., to visit friends and to cast their votes Tuesday. Their many friends here are always glad to greet them.
Miss Edna Ruff, teacher of the fourth grade, spent Friday and Saturday of last week at the home of her parents at Marinette.
Mrs E. K. Wolfram left Tuesday for Milwaukee and Chicago to replenish her stock of millinery and millinery goods which was so largely reduced in the pre-Easter sale.
William Henry of Milwaukee, who has been here spending his Easter vacation with his parents, returned Tuesday to resume his work of teaching in the public schools in that city.
Uld Ward, who has spent the winter in Wausau, where he was engaged in tuning pianos, returned Tuesday and is again playing the harp in Rube’s orchestra.
Clarence Marcott, assistant cashier in the State Bank, spent Sunday at Green Bay visiting relatives and near relatives, and says he had a most enjoyable time, especially with the near relatives.
Farmers in this neighborhood are busy plowing. and report the frosts entirely out of the ground.
Frank Lingelbach of Oconto came up in his auto Monday night, bringing Congressman D. G. Classon to fill his political engagement here.

ELM GROVE
(Too late for last week)
Miss Edith DonLevy spent Saturday and Sunday at her home in Oconto.
John Gauthier returned home Saturday from Blackwell, where he was employed.
Mr, and Mrs. Wm.Telford and daughter, Doris, visited at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Marek Sunday evening.
A. Kempen went to Shawano Monday on business.
Edward and Louis Hoffman of Little River were callers in this vicinity Sunday evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Adams of Lena called at the home of Mr. and Mrs, John Loberger Monday.
Miss Lizzie Gauthier left Tuesday for Green Bay, where she will visit relatives and friends.

LINZY BROOK
Miss Hattie Koeppen returned to her home last Sunday, after working the past winter in Shawano.
Mrs. Joseph Holl returned home from Shawano, after spending a week with her parents, Mr, and Mrs. Horn. She was accompanied home by her sister, Miss Emma Horn.
Paul Bucholz spent the last of the Koeppen Bucholz. week visiting friends and relatives in Shawano.
Mrs. Herman Bucholz and son, 0scar, made a trip to Clintonville Wednesday morning to consult the doctor in regard to the latter’s health.
Claude Tyrell spent Sunday evening in the Frank Settlement.
Antone Boerschinger is busy putting up a new house on the old Heifner place.
Wm. Jeske and sister, Emma, spent a few days of last week at Green Bay with their brother, Emil, who is in the hospital.
Mrs. Matt Holl and son, Harry, spent Monday in Hintz.
Mr. and Mrs, Max Schuettpelz and family were seen on our streets Thursday.
Robert Firgens is employed at Henry Wegner’s.
Mrs, Anna Shournard, Frances Holl and Fred Holl spent Saturday in Suring.
Adolf Neuman and family made a trip to Oconto Falls Monday.
Mr. and Mrs. Erbs spent Sunday at John Tyrell’s.
Everybody is busy making maple sugar.
Those that have received Palmerbuttons this year are Caroline and Fred Holl, Margaret and Verona Koeppen, and Agnes and Esther Edward Holl has received a gold star.

S H 0 R T   N 0 T E S
Miss Frances Gauthier of Milwaukee spent Easter with her parents here, Mr. and Mrs. C. Gauthier.
Mr. and Mrs. Chris. Johnson of Oshkosh visited with relatives and friends here during the week.
Miss Leona Dupries, teacher of the school near Breed, spent Sunday at the home of her parents here. She was accompanied by Miss Jeanette Meyers of Breed.
New stock of Georgette Waists in combination colors, received at the Lipschutz Store.
adv. Ladies’ Coats, Dresses and Top Skirts of the latest materials and colors, and smartest styles, at a saving of from $3 to $5, at the Lipschutz Store. adv.
Miss Beatrice Couillard went to Shawano yesterday to attend the minstrel entertainment given in that city last night for the beneft of the Red Cross. She was the guest of Lucy Schweres while in Shawano.
Mrs. Sam Patterson is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Homer Hubbard, at Oshkosh, and enjoying the sensation of fondling her recently born twin grandchildren—a boy and girl.
Sam Young of Oconto, manager of the Oconto branch of the National Posting Company, was in town yesterday overseeing the distribution of thousands of sale bills for the Continental Clothing Co. The bills were distributed throughout Oconto and Marinette counties.
There is a conflict on now between the cold north wind and the sun for control of the temperature. We’ll bet on the sun.
If you need anything in the fancy jewelry line, such as rings, bracelets, wrist watches, emblematic pins, etc, call and look over our stock. We can order anything for you in the best of material at a great saving—anything in the line of watches, fancy articles and diamonds. II, Bauman. adv.
Just received, another shipment of Ladies’ Coats, Silk Dresses, Waists, and Skirts, at the most reasonable prices. ll. Buaman. adv.
Buy your shoes for the family at H. Bauman’s and save money. adv.
R. S. Meyers, who has been employed in building the residences on Washington avenue, left Wednesday for Clintonville, where he has been offered permanent employment at good wages.
Read the advertisements in The Farmer—Herald. Our live merchants are bidding for your business and are offering you all kinds of seasonable merchandise, etc., at prices as low as can be obtained anywhere in the State.
We are glad to state that Hugh Henry, who recently met with a severe accident, is recovering, and though the process is somewhat slow he will be restored to his normal physical condition.
W. F. Siegler will have an auction of his farm stock, which comprises some fine bred cattle, on Friday, April 12.
Have your measure taken for an Ed. V, Price suit. Highest quality of tailoring in the country. 500 all wool samples to select from. Delivery in six days. The Lipschutz Store, adv.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kaufmann visited at the home of Mr, and Mrs. Hugh Henry in the town of Oconto Falls Friday evening of last week.
Sylvester Ehlinger, who has been home for a visit with his parents, returned on Monday to Crystal Falls.
Miss Elsie Zeroth of Couillardville was a visitor here last Saturday evening.
Mrs. T. F. Reynolds and son, Francis, visited at Oconto recently.
Wm. and Howard Henry spent last Saturday afternoon in Oconto.
Harry Bauman, proprietor of the ready-to-wear store, made a business trip to Clintonville Monday night.
Miss Fay Goddard, who has been at International Falls, Minn, since last fall, returned home Thursday of last week.
Rube’s orchestra is again in almost nightly demand furnishing music for dances and other entertainments all over the northeastern part of Wisconsin.


Oconto County Enterprise
August 9, 1918
contributed by  Cathe Ziereis

THE DEATH ROLL

John A Brown

John A. Brown died at his home on Friday noon of hemorrhage. It was a shock to his relatives and friends, as he seemed apparently in fair health up to within a day or so of his death. He had not recovered from an attack of pneumonia contracted last December. He was 29 years of age and leaves to mourn him his mother and stepfather, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Norton, one brother Floyd Brown, who is in France in service, four stepsisters, Mrs. L. Stoffen, Mrs. Art Classon, Mrs. Chas. Swear and Etta Norton who were all present at the funeral. Others present from outside were Ed, John, Ruby William and Miss Florence Swear of Pensaukee; Ed Rost, Coleman; Elsie Keeppen, Delvan; Mr. Johnson of Kenosha and Mr. and Mrs. Touschak of Abrams.

The funeral was held on Monday at 2:30 p.m. from the Episcopal church, Rev Fr. Curtis officiating and burial was in Evergreen cemetery.

Alexander Lucas

Alexander Lucas died at his home in Stiles on Friday evening, after an illness covering a period of several years since he had a paralytic stroke. He was 63 years of age. His wife died a few months ago.

The funeral was held from the Presbyterian church at Oconto, Sunday afternoon, Rev. E. W. Wright officiating. Burial was in Evergreen.

Surviving kinfolk’s are four sons, Walter, of Oconto Falls; William, overseas in the army; Norman and Robert of Stiles; and four daughters, Mrs. John McCarthy of Claywood, and Jennie; Mae and Jessy at home. There is a sister, Mrs. Holland, of Michigan; and nine grandchildren.

Frank Neta

Frank Neta, of Spruce, died at his home there on Friday after a year of much suffering, at the age of 45. He was buried from St. Charles’ church at Lena, Rev. Fr Kolbe officiating and internment was in the Catholic cemetery.

He is survived by his wife who was Maggie Mashinok, and six children, Edward, Florence, Irene, Evelyn, Margaret and Elinor.

Social Events

Keith – Noyes Invitation

Invitations have been received in Oconto announcing the wedding of Lieut. Walter Keith and Miss Fama Noyes, of Marinette, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Noyes. The cards read:

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Eugene Noyes request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter, Fama Isabella to Mr. Walter Paramore Keith, Wednesday morning the 14th of August 1914, at 10 o’clock, St. Paul’s Church Marinette, Wis.

Lieut. Keith is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Clevland R. Keith of Oconto. He has seen much service and recently has been inspector for the government of war materials being made at a large rubber goods manufactory at Akron, Ohio.

The father of the bride is the president of the Eagle Printing Co., and manager of Marinette Eagle-Star for many years.


Oconto County Reporter
Thursday Aug. 15, 1918
Researched and contributed by: Mary

Make Last Sacrifice
Two Oconto Boys Lay Down Lives for Humanity -
Sharpley and St. Louis

Families Each Contribute a Life in World Fight for Civilization  --
Boyhood Friends

Sheldon D. Sharpley and 
Alex St. Louis.
Boyhood friends shown in playful photograph from happier days.

We have this week to chronicle the death of two Oconto boys who have paid the highest price man can pay in the present world fight for humanity and civilization.

    Sheldon D. Sharpley, son of Mr. And Mrs. Alex Sharpley and Roland St. Louis, son of Alex St. Louis.

   The two boys who were killed fighting gloriously for the cause lived in Oconto all their lives and were boyhood friends and chums.

   Mr. Sharpley was born February 3, 1896, and became a member of Company M four years ago when 18 years old.  He served with the company on the Mexican border and with them went to Camp Douglas, Waco. Tex., and then to France.   On July 27 he was severely wounded in action and word was received here last Thursday night that he died on August 2 as the result of his wounds.

   He is survived by his parents, his brother, Morris of Company M, detailed to the headquarter detachment of the 127th regiment, brother, Truman of the 150th (Rainbow Division) brother, Nathaniel at Camp Zachary Taylor, Louisville, Ky., four other brothers, Lyle, Ralph, Howard, and Harry, at home and one sister, Mrs. Frank Smith, of the town of Little River.

   Word was received here Saturday that Roland St. Louis, aged 18 (editor's note - born in 1894, age was 24 years), the son of Alex St. Louis, Pecor Street, was killed in action July 18.

   Young St. Louis was born here and had lived his whole life at the home on Pecor street until 3 years ago when he enlisted in the marines.

   He is survived by his father, one brother, Lieutenant Joseph St. Louis, who is a staff officer, detailed for duty as an interpreter in France, and two sisters, Mrs. Joseph Mauer, Marinette, and Miss Beatrice St. Louis, who resides with their uncle, Rev. Fr. Therien of St. John’s church, Green Bay.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Oconto County Enterprise
August 9, 1918
contributed by  Cathe Ziereis

THE DEATH ROLL

John A Brown

John A. Brown died at his home on Friday noon of hemorrhage. It was a shock to his relatives and friends, as he seemed apparently in fair health up to within a day or so of his death. He had not recovered from an attack of pneumonia contracted last December. He was 29 years of age and leaves to mourn him his mother and stepfather, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Norton, one brother Floyd Brown, who is in France in service, four stepsisters, Mrs. L. Stoffen, Mrs. Art Classon, Mrs. Chas. Swear and Etta Norton who were all present at the funeral. Others present from outside were Ed, John, Ruby William and Miss Florence Swear of Pensaukee; Ed Rost, Coleman; Elsie Keeppen, Delvan; Mr. Johnson of Kenosha and Mr. and Mrs. Touschak of Abrams.

The funeral was held on Monday at 2:30 p.m. from the Episcopal church, Rev Fr. Curtis officiating and burial was in Evergreen cemetery.

Alexander Lucas

Alexander Lucas died at his home in Stiles on Friday evening, after an illness covering a period of several years since he had a paralytic stroke. He was 63 years of age. His wife died a few months ago.

The funeral was held from the Presbyterian church at Oconto, Sunday afternoon, Rev. E. W. Wright officiating. Burial was in Evergreen.

Surviving kinfolk’s are four sons, Walter, of Oconto Falls; William, overseas in the army; Norman and Robert of Stiles; and four daughters, Mrs. John McCarthy of Claywood, and Jennie; Mae and Jessy at home. There is a sister, Mrs. Holland, of Michigan; and nine grandchildren.

Frank Neta

Frank Neta, of Spruce, died at his home there on Friday after a year of much suffering, at the age of 45. He was buried from St. Charles’ church at Lena, Rev. Fr Kolbe officiating and internment was in the Catholic cemetery.

He is survived by his wife who was Maggie Mashinok, and six children, Edward, Florence, Irene, Evelyn, Margaret and Elinor.

Social Events

Keith – Noyes Invitation

Invitations have been received in Oconto announcing the wedding of Lieut. Walter Keith and Miss Fama Noyes, of Marinette, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Noyes. The cards read:

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Eugene Noyes request the honor of your presence at the marriage of their daughter, Fama Isabella to Mr. Walter Paramore Keith, Wednesday morning the 14th of August 1914, at 10 o’clock, St. Paul’s Church Marinette, Wis.

Lieut. Keith is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Clevland R. Keith of Oconto. He has seen much service and recently has been inspector for the government of war materials being made at a large rubber goods manufactory at Akron, Ohio.

The father of the bride is the president of the Eagle Printing Co., and manager of Marinette Eagle-Star for many years.



Oconto County Reporter
Thursday September 5, 1918
contributed by Richard La Brosse

Mrs. Rose Sherman was surprised Sunday afternoon by a number of her friends, the occasion being her 71st birthday anniversary.  Mrs. J.D. Herrion of Marinette spent Sunday evening with her mother, Mrs. Sherman.
 

Harry Starbuck of Oconto and Bill Zimdars of Gillett, both members of Company M. were killed in action August 4th.

Harry Starbuck, whose home is in Grawn, Mich., was engineer at the W.F. Williams Co. plant and came here from Traverse City with that firm.  He enlisted with Company M shortly after the United States entered the war.  He was about twenty-three years old, and is a cousin of Milton Harr, assistant superintendent at the flooring plant.

Bill Zimdars is a Gillett boy and the second from that village to give his life for his country.

Mr. and Mrs. Mort Williams and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Egan of Manitowoc drove to Oconto Saturday and spent Sunday with relatives.  Mr. and Mrs. Williams visited Mrs. Williams mother, Mrs. T.H. Phelps, and Mr. and Mrs. Egan visited at the F.W. Gardner home.

Mrs. M.B. Lassin, who spent the past few days with her mother, Mrs. Kate Cook, returned to Milwaukee Monday.  Mrs. Lassin will leave Milwaukee soon to join her husband at Tacoma, Wash., where they will make their future home.

Hugh Murphy returned to Kenosha Saturday, after visiting his sister Mrs. Will Lance.

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Isaccson of Pulcifer spent Monday with the latter’s parents , Mr. and Mrs. H.F. Becker, on Jefferson St.

Henry Becker, Jr., will leave to join the colors Friday morning.  He is the fourth son of Mr. and Mrs. H.F. Becker in the service of Uncle Sam.  Arnold W. across the seas, Harry C. at Camp Grant, Ill., and Leslie at Great Lakes, Ill.

Miss Adeline Masterson returned to Chicago Wednesday, after spending several months with her mother, Mrs. H.F. Jones.

Mrs. Henry Deloria has returned to her home in Gardon, Mich., after spending two weeks with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Driscoll.  She was accompanied home by her daughter, Mildred, who was recently operated upon at Green Bay for appendicitis.

Mrs. Will Burke of Milwaukee is a guest of her sister, Mrs. Jack O’Connell, in the city.

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Jackson and son of Fond du Lac are visiting the former’s father James Jackson, on Superior avenue.

Mrs. John Porterfield and daughters, Edith, Bernice and Marian, and Mrs. A. G. Cecil and daughter, Ethel, drove to Couillardville Wednesday and spent the day with friends.

Local and Personal

Mrs. Katherine Kadlec of Spruce visited her sister, Mrs. Jos. Peisar, in the city Friday and Monday.

Mrs. Sam Kucera and daughter, Miss Kate, spent Saturday in the city with friends.

The Misses Helen and Jeanette Western of Kelly Lake visited relatives in the city last thrusday and Friday.

Mr. and Mrs. James Cerveny and little daughter, Verna, of Spruce visited relatives in the city Monday and attended the picnic.

Irving Riley, who is on the battleship “Wisconsin” visited Sunday and Monday with his mother, Mrs. Jane Riley and sister, Miss Margaret.

Lena

A farewell party was given Monday evening at the Herbert Whiting home in honor of Harry Exford and Albert Zens, who left Tuesday with the drafted men for Georgia.

Mr. and Mrs. Dick Colson returned home from Soperton, after a few days visit with their daughter, Mrs. Henry Jarvey.
 

Breed

Mrs. Frank Davis, Sr., and Mrs. Archie Bonesteel and little son drove to Suring Tuesday to visit their daughter and sister, Mrs. Wm. Cato.

Mrs. H.L. Scott visited with her daughter, Mrs. R.M. Stengel, of Suring a couple of days this week.
 

Abrams

Mrs. J. Grenfel left for Byron, Ill., Friday after spending most of the summer with her mother, Mrs. J. Peters.  Miss Melba Grenfel accompanied her mother as far as Green Bay and then took a train west to Black River Falls where she will teach kindergarten.
 

W.H. Knowles had a sale of household goods Thursday.  The family left for the west in their Overland car on Labor Day taking the upper route in order to visit Mr. and Mrs. Earl Knowles at Fernwood, Idaho, before going to Seattle, Wash.



The Farmer Herald
Oconto Falls
Friday, Sept. 6, 1918
Submitted by Richard LaBrosse

YOUNG MAN KILLED SUNDAY

Vincent Usiak of Chase Accidentally Shot While Hunting

 THOUGHT GUN WAS UNLOADED

Andrew Dolata Turned Gun On Companion For Fun 

- Pulled Trigger And Instantly Killed Him

Vincent Usiak of the town of Chase was accidentally shot Sunday while hunting with his brother, Joseph, and two chums, Andrew Dolata and Antone Brezezinski.  The four boys started to go hunting over near the Pensaukee river.  They had one gun for the four.  On the way to the river they took turns firing at marks.  The gun was passed from one to another constantly.  Joseph Usiak, after saying he was going to fire at a mark, passed the gun to young Dolata, who thought that Usiak had removed the shell from the gun.  He turned to Vincent Usiak, who came up behind him and said, “if you were only a rabbit I would shoot you,” and pointing the gun at him pulled the trigger.  The shot entered the young man’s chest and killed him instantly.

Ragen’s Crossing

Margaret Krause returned to her home in Sobieski Saturday, after spending the past two months with her grandfather, John Ragen.

Mrs. Chas. Cook and children of Chase are visiting the former’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Murphy.

Miss Eva Porter spent Sunday with her parents at Stiles Junction.

Clara Belongia of Green Bay is spending a few days at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Belongia.

Mr. and Mrs. C.W. Carlson and son, Bentley, returned Wednesday afternoon from a visit of several days with Mr. Carlson’s mother at Sister Bay, in Door County.

W.C. Mills of Hickory came down Wednesday morning, bringing his brother and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. John Mills of Battle Creek, Mich.



Oconto County Reporter
Sept. 26, 1918

KEBEL IS CAPTURED

Sheriff Telford and secret Service Officer Vaill Bring him in.

Trailed to Hunting Camp

Henry Heimerl and Lyman High Assist on Long Hike across Peshtigo Brook Marshes

Henry Kebel, who September 8 picked his way out of the Oconto jail where he was held on a charge of desertion and had since been picking locks, and helping himself to autos, guns, provisions, etc., was captured Tuesday morning by Secret Service Officer A. A. Vaill and sheriff Telford assisted by Henry Heimerl and Lyman High of the town of Bagley and brought to the county jail the same day.

Mr. High saw Kebel pass near his place Saturday loaded up with a pack of provisions and utensils he had taken from the home of Jerry Fitzgerald, a bachelor living near Mr. High’s place in the town of Bagley, while Mr. Fitzgerald was away at work. High watched him go north over what was known as the “Hogback”.

He suspected that it was Kebel and that he was headed for the old Hubbard camps on the Peshtigo Brook marshes in the east part of the town of Armstrong.

He notified Sheriff Telford who with Mr. Vaill started after him.

With the aid of Mr. Heimerl and Mr. high, who like Kebel were familiar with the country, they trailed him through the forest and swaps and about nearly exhausted they reached the Hubbard camps. These they searched with the aid of light from matches but failed to find him.

The old Huntley camps were a short distance further out and through a window looking toward the Hubbard camps. Kebel evidently saw the lights and went out of the door on the opposite side of the camp leading into the brush a few yards away.

When they reached the camp the officers found fresh sticks of wood evidently laid on the fire a few moments before. They took possession of the camp and remained there until morning when Mr. Vaill stayed quietly inside expecting a possible return of Kebel for provisions or gun and the others scattered out and began a search of timber and plains.

A little later as Mr. Telford was sitting near a stump for a few minutes rest Kebel walked out near him and before he could escape Telford had him covered and his hands up in the air.

Footsore and weary the party marched Kebel to the auto and brought him into Oconto Tuesday afternoon and this morning Sheriff Telford took him to Fort Sheridan.
 

 


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