Oconto County WIGenWeb Project
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OCONTO COUNTY
Wisconsin
FAMILIES and BIOGRAPHIES

Text and Photographs Submitted by Descendant: Pat Conley

KELLY

         PATRICK KELLY   



Patrick Kelly

Patrick Kelly and daughters.

Patrick Kelly at Kelly Lake in 1903, shortly before he died.
Mike Killian Collection
(great grandson of Mary Jane Kelly)


Patrick Kelly and Family (unidentified) in 1903 at Kelly Lake
Mike Killian Collection
(great grandson of Mary Jane Kelly)

John Kelly 1895


John Kelly age 45 in 1895.  Gentleman with John is unidentified.
John Kelly was Pat Kelly's son and is buried in Hickory Cemetery

Mike Killian Collection
(great grandson of Mary Jane Kelly)
Livinia Kelly (wife of John Kelly) with daughter Mary Jane Kelly

Mary Jane Kelly, age 2, was the daughter of John Kelly and Levina Piggott Kelly.

Mike Killian Collection
(great grandson of Mary Jane Kelly)

Patrick Kelly was born March 21, 1815 in Ireland to John Kelly and Ann McKenna.  He died November 15, 1903 in Maple Valley, Oconto Co., WI and was buried in the Kelly Family Cemetery, Maple Valley, Oconto Co., WI. 
Margaret (Peggy) Moore was born in 1822 and died September 3, 1896 in Hickory, Oconto Co., WI. 

Children:
 
John Kelly was born April 10, 1849 in New York. Married Levena Piggott August 8, 1895.  Died February 20, 1895.
Mary Jane Kelly was born August 12, 1852 in Milwaukee Co., WI.  Married John Caravagh Gilligan September 29, 1874.  Died December 19, 1918.
James Kelly was born August 21, 1853 in Oconto Co., WI.  Died July 15 1857.
Rose Anna "Annie" Kelly was born April 6, 1856 in Oconto Co., Wi.  Married Gustave Yance August 15, 1872.  Died November 30, 1892.
Margaret "Little Maggie" Kelly was born September 4, 1858 in Oconto Co., WI and died in 1858 as a baby.
Isabelle Kelly was born August 17, 1860 in Oconto Co., WI.  Married William James Sloan October 12, 1892.  Died September 5, 1927.
Emily Kelly was born July 1863 in Oconto Co., WI.  Married John Kammer July 6, 1888.  Died May 31, 1894. 
Margaret Elizabeth Kelly was born May 13, 1867 in Oconto Co., WI.  Married Charles Chamberlain August 26, 1891.  Died November 14, 1891.

Information supplied by Maria Gilligan.
 
         PATRICK KELLY    

Please click on the topic below to go there!

KELLY Family History in Hickory Corners

1874 Letter from Hugh KELLY (Australia) to his brother, Patrick KELLY,(USA)

Some Gleanings from the Hugh KELLY letter of 6 September 1874

Family Photo Album
Rose Anna Kelly and Gustave Yance

Gustave Yance who was married to Pat Kelly's daughter, Rose Anna Kelly
The Rose Anna "Annie" Kelly and Gustave Yance family lived first in Maple Valley and later in Spruce, Oconto County, Wisconsin.

Rose Anna "Annie" Kelly - born April 6, 1856 in Oconto County., Wisconsin.  Died November 30, 1892.   Married Gustave Yance, August 15, 1872
Gustave Yance - born 1848 in Germany, immigrated in 1854.
Children
John Yance - born 1874
William Yance - born 1877
Rosa Ann Yance (Frank Warner) - born July 1878
Paul Yance - born July 1881
Emma Yance - born October 1883
Maggie Yance - born February 1886
Charles Yance - born July 1887
LillyYance - born May 1890
Eddie Yance - born October 1892

Mary Jane Kelly and John Caravagh Gilligan

George, Tom, Mag, Lil, Rose, Larry Gilligan
Rose, Larry, Lillian Gilligan

Mary Jane Kelly Gilligan

Louisa Beekman & Liz Gilligan

Margaret Gilligan & Dan McDonnell


Liz & Tom Gilligan

Tom Gilligan Family

Tom Gillilgan

Tom Gilligan
The Gilligan family lived in Maple Valley, Oconto County, Wisconsin. The couple had 9 children.

Mary Jane Kelly - was born August 12, 1852 in Milwaukee Co., WI.  Died December 19, 1918. Married John Caravagh Gilligan September 29, 1874. .
John Gilligan -Husband of Mary Jane Kelly, was born October 1841 in Ireland, immigrated 1868
Children
George Gilligan - born 1875
Thomas
Gilligan - born 1877
John
Gilligan - born 1879
Margaret E Gilligan - born November 1881
Mary E.
Gilligan - born February 1884
Bridget G.
Gilligan - born March 1886
Lillian E.
Gilligan - born August 1888
Rose E.
Gilligan - born January 1891
Daniel L.
Gilligan - born March 1893

Pat Kelly Family

Patrick Kelly was born March 21, 1815 in Ireland to John Kelly and Ann McKenna.  He died November 15, 1903 in Maple Valley, Oconto Co., WI and was buried in the Kelly Family Cemetery, Maple Valley, Oconto Co., WI. 

Margaret (Peggy) Moore was born in 1822 and died September 3, 1896 in Hickory, Oconto Co., WI.  It is believed Pat Kelly worked for Margaret Moore's father, a lumberman in Canada, met his daughter and eloped,  entering the United States at Niagara Falls and were married as written by William Sloan March 3, 1988 per conversation with Adelia Sloan Wilkinson.

Children:
 
John Kelly was born April 10, 1849 in New York. Married Levena Piggott August 8, 1895.  Died February 20, 1895.

Mary Jane Kelly was born August 12, 1852 in Milwaukee Co., WI.  Married John Caravagh Gilligan September 29, 1874.  Died December 19, 1918.

James Kelly was born August 21, 1853 in Oconto Co., WI.  Died July 15 1857.

Rose Anna "Annie" Kelly was born April 6, 1856 in Oconto Co., Wi.  Married Gustave Yance August 15, 1872.  Died November 30, 1892.

Margaret "Little Maggie" Kelly was born September 4, 1858 in Oconto Co., WI and died in 1858 as a baby.

Isabelle Kelly was born August 17, 1860 in Oconto Co., WI.  Married William James Sloan October 12, 1892.  Died September 5, 1927.

Emily Kelly was born July 1863 in Oconto Co., WI.  Married John Kammer July 6, 1888.  Died May 31, 1894. 

Margaret Elizabeth Kelly was born May 13, 1867 in Oconto Co., WI.  Married Charles Chamberlain August 26, 1891.  Died November 14, 1891.

Information supplied by Maria Gilligan.

______________________________

This is from "Hickory Corner: A History" prepared for the 65 year Hickory School Reunion - August 12, 1979 and published by the Hickory Chapter of the Oconto County Historical Society. 

The Community

 Hickory is rich in the legend of Pat Kelly, who came from Ireland in 1855 to become the first white settler before the land was surveyed.  His closest neighbor lived in Stiles, some miles distant, in a day when it was necessary to go to Oconto for provisions by foot or by ox team.  It is told that Mr. Kelly hitched up the oxen to go to Oconto for a doctor when his baby was ill with croup, and when he returned the child was dead and buried. The story is told that as a Justice of the Peace Mr. Kelly was not perturbed by the lack of two witnesses to a marriage ceremony.  Joining hands of the bride and groom, he took them to a large elm tree which was a witness tree on a section corner and intoned, "Under this witness tree what Pat Kelly and God Almighty has joined together, let no man put asunder."
 
Kelly Lake and Kelly Brook are named after this colorful pioneer.

The sixteen page booklet goes on to talk about other towns people, the churches, ministers, the school, the rural one room school, woodman hall, and teachers from 1870 to 1961.
____________________________

Newspaper name or date is not given.  However, handwritten in a corner is date 6-3-76. 

 Pat Kelly Pioneer In Settling Hickory Area

(Editor's Note:  This is the third in a series of articles written and illustrated by Bette Rae Turner of Kelly Lake concerning the history of the "tri-lake territory".)

 KELLY LAKE -  The settlers are here to stay.  Boundaries have narrowed considerably around the "tri-lake Territory."  It's 130 years ago and Wisconsin has become the 30th state taking it's name from the Indian name for the Wisconsin River with it's final spelling. The Indians have relinquished all territorial rights, and many have been moved to distant reservations.  English and French have been forced to change their attitudes toward settlers.  Many have moved on, but all three have left their influence upon this infant state. Enough settlers have come to Wisconsin to be able to contribute 91,000 Union soldiers to fight in the Civil War. An even smaller boundary around the tri-lakes has been laid out and taken it's name, Oconto County, from the Indian name for the river, which may have meant "place of the pickerel" or the Menominee word meaning "black bass'".  The small settlement of Hickory Corners has sprung up near our shores. One of the settlers to the Hickory area, who may have been most important to Kelly Lake citizens, was Pat Kelly, whose grave site is pictured. (Note: Copied illustration of picture is very poor).
________________________________


The following is an article written by Nell Shellman for the Hickory Centennial, a newspaper published August 23-24, 1975, in honor of the 100th birthday of the Hickory United Methodist Church.

 "The Site - Hickory  Hill"

 "One could not compose the church history without envisioning the territory as it was in the mid-nineteenth century.  It was a wilderness of heavy timber, lakes, streams, and rivers, trackless to any traveler but the native Indian. "Pat Kelly, a colorful Irishman, who had left the Emerald Isle as a lad of fifteen, arrived in Canada, almost penniless.  He is thought to be the first to see Hickory in that time, settling here in 1859.  In Canada his first work was in a hotel.  He met and married a young woman by the name of Margaret Moore.  It must have been soon afterward they moved to Oconto. This was just a small settlement of rude log cabins and a few stores at the mouth of the Oconto River on the Bay Shore.  They worked hard here for a few years and then decided that this place just was not their "cup of tea". "Packing their belongings in a cart drawn by a team of oxen, they began a trek toward the west.  apparently veering north.  Often Pat had to chop down trees to make a path for the cart.  Two weeks later on a bright spring morning they arrived at Hickory and decided that this was their place. " "It was not long and they had a samll log house built.  It is reported that there were hickory trees and the land was the "rolling" type which provides good drainage for farmlands. . . "The Kelly's nearest neighbors were at Stiles and Oconto.  A shopping trip took a week.  (Talk about isolation) . . . "Kelly Lake honors this historical pioneer figure and is told that resorters tried at times to change the name to Crystal Lake.  Such moves were defeated." A Pat Kelly was known to have owned land on the west side of the lake, then known as Crystal Lake, but became know as Kelly's Lake because Kelly tried to sell lots to people. A very old plat book pictures the lake rather poorly, and spells the name Kelley.  Some people remember a Kelly who rented boats down on the south end to the lake many, many years ago. Whether all of these recollections are of the same Pat Kelly from Canada, or descendents of his, we do not know, but in any case, one of the tri-lakes now has  it's present name.
 

The Oconto Falls Herald dated Friday, November 20, 1903 had the following account:

Pat Kelly Obituary:
 
Patrick Kelly On Saturday last Patrick Kelly, of Kelly Lake, one of the pioneer settlers, crossed the great divide to "that bourne from which no weary traveler e'er returns."  Mr. Kelly was something of a character and was perhaps one of the most widely known residents in Oconto County.  In his earlier days to the honorable occupations of farming and lumberman he added the dignified role of justice of the peace, and possessed the rare faculty of interpreting law with a rapidity and daring that made him famous.  With the exception of one daughter, Mrs. John (Mary Kelly) Gilligan of Amanda, Mr. Kelly was alone in the world in the matter of relatives, his wife, sons, and daughters all having preceded him on the great journey.  The deceased was upwards of eighty years of age, and for several years past he lived in a cabin on the farm of George Beyer, at Kelly Lake.
_____________________________

Oconto County Reporter - Saturday, April 23, 1881

 A certain son of the Emerald Isle, whom we will call Pat, for short, and a certain legal light have not been on loving terms for sometime, and the great delight of Pat, is to get him into all the trouble he can.  A short time ago Pat, secured a young bear and thought it would be just about the proper thing to send it as a present to him.  So he had it properly labeled and shipped it by stage.  The stage driver led the bear into the lawyer's office, but he was over attending a lawsiuit he was interested in and the stage driver tied it to the leg of the table.  Sometime after this the lawyer went up to his office and sat down to the table to write, unconscious that there was a bear in the room.  In moving his feet around he came in contract with the bear's ear.  The bear didn't like this and began to hug the lawyer's leg.  The lawyer kicked but the bear only hugged the more.  Things had now grown desparate, both fighting with wicked determination.  The bear had the best of it, however, and all that was left of the lawyer's pants was a rear button hanging at the end of his suspender.  About this time three ladies happend in, but they immediately rushed out and told those on the sidewalk that there were two bears fighting in the lawyer's office.  The men rushed up to see what was the matter.  They found the lawyer sitting up in the transom over the door, and the bear trying to climp up after him.  They at once secured the bear and helped the lawyer down from his perch.  After a free use of court plaster, and getting into a new pair of pants, he was able to appear in public once more.  The last seen of him he was going up Main street with a double-barreled shot-gun looking for the stage driver who left the bear. Pat (Kelly) had his revenge.
 _____________________________

John Kelly (Pat Kelly's Son) Obituary:

Unknown paper - Dated February 21, 1896

      John Kelly Killed Tree Fell Upon Him Yesterday Afternoon Died Twenty Minutes After the Accident Well Know in Oconto and a Member of the Local Order of Odd Fellows -Particulars Meagre.
 ______________________________

 A telephone messge from H.M. Lord of Hickory, yesterday afternoon, conveyed the sad news that John Kelly, a pioneer of Oconto county, was almost instantly killed by a tree, which he had been chopping, falling upon him.  Mr. Kelly was well know in the city, highly respected, and a member of the local order of Odd Fellows.  Today, Charles Lynes and A.J. Caldwell, representling the order, are at the home of the unfortunate man, making arrangements for the funeral, which possibly may be held on Sunday. Mr. Kelly was about 45 years of age, and married.
 ______________________________

Family records show John was the oldest son of Pat Kelly.  John was born April 10, 1849 in New York to Patrick Kelly and Margaret (Peggy) Moore.  Had been first married  to to Maggie Reynolds (b.1846-d.1886 and most recently to Levena Piggot  with one child, Mary Jane Kelly.      ______________________________

Margaret (Moore) Kelly Obituary:

The Inquirer - City of Oconto, Wis., Friday, Sept. 11, 1896
Obituary:
Mrs. Marguerite Kelly died at her home near Kelly Lake on Thursday of last week of general debility, aged seventy-four years.  She was the wife of Patrick Kelly who is very well known in this city.  The funeral was held from the residence Saturday.
 ____________________

Certificate of Death for Margaret Kelly
states she was born in Ireland in 1822. Died September 3, 1896 of general debility in Hickory, Wis. Undertaker conducting burial was W.B. Mitchell, Oconto, Wis.  Certificate states burial was in Hickory Cemetery although family accounts state she was buried in the Kelly Family Cemetery.  Note:  the Certificate of Death on file at the Oconto County Court house does not look official and is hand typed on a piece of paper. ----
___________________


Bruce Paulson - March 21, 1983
 

 Close Proximity

 Among the early settler in the County were some strong characters.  One of them  was Pat Kelly, who had a farm on the (Kelly) lake which was named for him.  One day he came into Holt & Balcom's office and said to Mr. Balcom, "Colonel, do you own such and such a forty?"  (giving the description.)  Mr. Balcom said, "Yes, why do you ask?"  "Well," Pat replied, "no reason, except that I notice a party cutting the timber in very close proximity to the forty and thought you would like to look into it."  Mr. Balcom sent a crusier to look it over as soon as possible, and when he got there he found that all of the timber on the forty had been cut and the logs landed  in Pestigo Brook and had been sold to one of the mill companies.  Assuming that the party who was cutting there had cut the timber, Holt & Balcom  sued him for the value of the trespass and in the course of the trail it appread that Pat Kelly himself had cut the timber, and consequenlty Holt & Balcom  lost the suit.  Mr. Balcom asked Pat why he told him that this man was cutting his timber, and Pat replied that he did not say that he cut the timber but only that he was cutting in very close proximity, and that was true as the man was cutting an adjoining forty.
_______________________________

Letter from Pat Kelly's Brother Hugh - 1874
Assembled by:  Lois Gilligan    Copied by:  Maria Gilligan

                 1874 Letter from Hugh KELLY (Australia) to his brother,  Patrick KELLY,(USA)

October 30, 1985 The following is a copy of a handwritten letter from Hugh KELLY in East Maitland, Australia, to his brother Patrick KELLY, Maple Valley, Oconto County, Wisconsin, USA dated 6 September 1874.  The letter is written on lined note pad type paper similar to the old tablet pad paper which many of us used as children.  There are three pages and each page is written on both sides.  Because of its age, it is very fragile, broken and torn in many places.  It was necessary to assemble it almost as a jigsaw puzzle to copy it.  To the best of our belief, it is in the correct order, but the pages were not numbered.  We think it is really only one letter, although at times it might appear that this is not true.  There is only one letter ending and only one signature.  The letter contains practically no punctuation, or indentation, in its format.  I have indicated the three pages by designating them as Page A, B, and C.  A question mark surrounding a word indicates handwriting which is difficult to decipher.  Dots . . . (torn) . . . indicate torn parts of pages.  I have attempted to copy the letter exactly as written.  The letter was assembled by Lois Gilligan and copied by Maria Gilligan on 17 October 1985, and is in the possession of Lois Gilligan, Green Bay, Wisconsin.
Assembled by:   Lois Gilligan    Copied by:   Maria Gilligan


1.      Letter from Hugh Kelly, Australia to Patrick Kelly, WI, USA.

Page A
East Maitland   September the 6th 1874

My dear Brother and Family  I received your letter dated April 29 it gave us great Pleasure to hear of yous all well a blessing which I hope will continue with yous  I am sorry to hear of my unfortunate Brother James   I knew he would never do any good for himself but I never knew him to be given after women   I suppose he will be exiled for the crime   in this country he would be hanged for it   I never read that Part of him or Mary to my wife   I would not like her to know that my sister was a turn coat or give her soul to the devil for the sake of Man

Dear Mary Jane Couzens Neice be careful of your Company   do not do anything of that kind without your Fathers opinion of it and God will bless your undertakings   I wish I could sit down amongst yous just for one week and John my nephew look out while your young for that is the time and not when you are old    I Dreamt last night I was among yous but mistaken when I woke   I thought Mary Jane we were talking all night   I thought it was daytime   I thought you were smiling but could not mind your complexion . . . (torn). . . the morning and sorry . . . (torn)

Reverse side of page A

Dear Brother you wish me to go that country    Dear I am afraid being so long in this colony the cold of your climate would not agree with my health   the children so small to go to sea   all that I am worth would be spent going there   so I would be afraid of my family being in misery if anything happened to me   God knows what is to be

You asked me to give yous a descripsion of this country   along the river sides is aluvial soil fit to grow anything corn tobacco sugar cane millet or any other crop twice in one year one in the winter and one in the summer that is Brush land   Forest land lays back full of large gum trees  Iron bark ceder in some parts rose wood box pine Forest soil is only grazing ground   You wish to know what the houses is built of    large Town or even Common Towns are Principaly Brick some with stone coins   some few with stone altogether   Settlers houses are  D . . (torn). . . ber with a few exceptions   My house is two rooms   I first built of wood and I put two more and a kitchen of brick and galvanized iron roof   only for the floods last year I would had the first two rooms of Bricks  also I have the Bricks in the yard this Season robbed for ever it rained all this year Ro . . s Bad and feeding a calamitous Price everything was against us

2.

Page B

Dear Brother I knowed . . (torn) . . . town this year   he brought Lucerne Hay on . . .  (torn) . . . orn to the amount of L 300 at L 2 per ton corn at S 2 per Bushel   he sold the hay for L 6 and the corn at SD 5-6 Per Bushel   if you could come into Maitland with  L 500 you would never have to work another day in your life   if you thought of coming your family would have come also   never part your Dear girls nor leave them behind   oh to  heaven that we were all standing together in George Street this night   I never saw ice thicker than the blade of a knife and only frost to sunrise   yet it is cold to those used in the Climate   it is very hot in Summer but Patt  I don't know what your ?money? is but I think your money is earned where you are   Dear Brother why not write to me   when I was in Ireland I had no view of friends in America only Ann   She was a kind sister always may the Lord comfort her   you wish to know where I first saw my wife   I saw her in . . . (torn) . . . t Maitland the first night that I was in Maitland   I met a shipmate of mine as I was coming into Maitland and left Dungog   I being there ? 4 ? years he told me stop at the Currancy ? Lass ?  Hotel and would come to spend the night . . .  (torn) . . .  so he did  he asked me to go out to another House in Rose St to see a Mrs. Kelly 89 years the first that just come of that day   we went   I was not long there when the House was full

Reverse side of Page B

I was . . .  (torn) . . . to another young woman   She came in and . . . (torn) . . . t down on the other side of the girl   I new she was to be my wife the first look   I had saw her in my dream the night before   She commenced poking fun at me about the other girl   I told her I meant herself   she was wild   I laughed at her and told her she was bound to be my wife   she did not like it but in six months she got out of her temper and we got married   She has no friends in this colony   her people is all at home but herself   She came to this against the consent of her Parents  so I expect it was her fate   She has one brother and two sisters married and one sister and 2 Brothers not married   the girl  is 17 years old I believe   she is a fine looking girl   Hannah says if you come to this Country she will give her to your John   There is any amount of girls in this country but if this Summer is hot they will  ?stink? with pride if they get sweethearts   They are ?not?  enough to fly like kites   They are humble uncouth white   no person looks after them   Dear Brother I am sorry about your married daugther   Dear Brother don't deny her while you are . . . (torn). . .  if he does not keep her comfortable keep . . . (torn) . . . as well as the rest and don't allow him near your Place   the longer the worse . . .  (torn) . . . account mothers name  I remember but th . . .  is just all  the Lord have mercy on her soul

3.

Page C

        This is Sunday am ink is greasy as shops not open  Dear Brother Read this letter to your daughters

Dear Neices my stomach is full of sorrow to think you lost your Dear Mother    if she was alive all would be well    Patt You did not tell me who Mrs. Kelly was or what was her name   I hope your daughter got married to a Roman Catholic Dear Girls and Brother also if yous was in this Colony yous would do well   Pat your girls would get well married in this Colony   Peasant girls gets good husbands in this country   there is no such thing as a fortune in this Country   Dear Pat you could do well in this town many ways   By Keeping a  Store or a Public House and many other ways   My house is at the Markitt  ? . . . ? where  ? only for the want of money after I built my House and the best Horses in Maitland got killed I would been well off today   I was always well Respected in Business   think for the best but your work is to sore in the turn of your age   if you come here you can get comfortable living without Bursting your self   I don't like you to be bursting  yourself   write soon and let me know what your intention is   Dear Mary Jane you and your sisters . . . (torn). . .  a letter Each of yous send me a fe . . .  (torn) . . . that is the first thing the  . . . (torn) . . .  yous have to say

Reverse side of page C

Aunt Hannah wishes Mary Jane to send her likeness to her and the children   enclose it in your letter   Mary Jane I will get you a good match    Don't you get married to Yankee    come to Australia and get a Corn Stalk   That is what the call the natives   your little cousin is all ill with the whooping cough   I had to write this letter at Mary Anns bedside to her cousins   thank God they said when they your letter   their Mother told them the stamps was uncle Patt   the turned to kissing of it

Your letter was 5 months coming to us   You could do well enough here without killing yourself   It is a fine country for girls there has been great floods in Pensylvenia great loss of life   I am afraid we have lost Plenty of our friends in it   write Soon and let us know you getting along   We all join in sending our Best Respects to you . . . (torn) . . . family no more at P  . . . (torn) . . .                                                  Your Brother Hugh . . . (torn). . . 

______________________________


Gleanings from the Hugh KELLY letter of 6 September 1874
By:  Maria Gilligan and Lois Gilligan


At the time the letter was written he lived in East Maitland, Australia;  he had also lived in Dungog for ?4? years.

Mentions Brother James KELLY - involved in a serious crime Sister Mary KELLY  - a "turn coat" Sister Ann - kind always His wife is Hannah (apparently from Ireland;  she had 3 brothers and 3 sisters and parents in Ireland.  She came alone to Australia against consent of her parents)

He has a daughter Mary Ann (with whooping cough)

He also has other young children "children so small."

He mentions Rose St., George St., Currancy ? Lass? Hotel

He received letter from Patrick KELLY dated April 29, 1874, by 6 September 1874  Said it took 5 months.  So probably it was mailed by Pat Kelly to Hugh Kelly in April 1874.  If this letter of Hugh to Pat Kelly dated 6 September 1874 took the same amount of time, then we could assume that Patrick received it sometime in February 1875.

Mentions flood in Pensylvenia.  "The" Johnstown, PA., USA, flood occurred in 1889, but there have always been floods there.  Is he talking about Pennsylvania, USA?  Or could there be such a place in Australia?  How would he have  "friends who were lost" in this flood in USA?  (Of course, many Irish emigrants settled in Pa., USA)  I will check this out in the WORLD GAZETEER next time I'm in the library.  I checked and there is only one Pennsylvania in the World Gazeteer so the friends may have been friends in Ireland who emigrated to Pa.  At the time Hugh Kelly's letter was written, 6 Sept. 1874, Pat Kelly's children were:
John           25 years
Mary Jane  22      (married John Gilligan 29 Sept. 1874)
Rosa Anna 18? 20? (married Gus Yance 15 Aug 1872)
Isabel         14
Emily          11
Margaret Elizabeth 7

We do not know when or at what age James and "Little" Maggie died;  we could not find death records at the Oconto Co. Courthouse for them.  (We might guess that they may have been born between Rosa Anna and Isabel, and between Emily and Margaret Elizabeth - only because of the span of years between these births . . . but then we might be wrong!)

Some facts on the KELLY family which would have bearing on the letter from Hugh KELLY (Australia) 6 September 1874:

The following are the children of Patrick KELLY and Margaret MOORE along with their marriage, birth and death dates:

John, b. 10 April 1849, d. 2 Feb. 1896, m. Levena PIGGOTT  8 August 1895 at his age 46

Mary Jane, b. 12 Aug 1852, d. 19 Dec 1918, m. John GILLIGAN 29 Sept 1874 at her age 22

Rosa Anna, b. 1856 - Death cert says born 15 April 1857 d. 30 Nov 1892 m. Gustave YANCE  15 August 1872 at her age 16   Isabell, b. 17 Aug 1860, d. 5 Sep 1927 m. William James SLOAN   12 October 1892 at her age 32

Emily, b. 1863 d. 31 May 1894 m.John KAMMER 6 July 1888, at her age 25

Margaret Elizabeth  b. 13 May 1867   d. 14 Nov 1891  m. Charley CHAMBERLAIN 26 Aug 1891 at her age 24 (therefore at the date of this letter, only one child of Patrick Kelly had married:  Rosa Anna to Gustave YANCE)

**

Ann KELLY (sister of Patrick and Hugh KELLY) born in Ireland, married John PARKER (born in Ireland) on 7 Nov 1861 in Perth County, Ontario, Canada.  The 1871 Ontario Census lists the following children:
John,       9 years
Patrick    7
Thomas   5
Hugh       3
Ann        11/12

and the 1881 Census adds
William    8
Julie         6

Hugh Parker emigrated to the U.S. in 1887;  Ann and John PARKER emigrated to the U.S. in 1888

**

The Patrick KELLY court cases involving his indebtedness begin (or rather, we have record of) beginning 26 April 1874; his possessions were seized by Gustave Yance, Sheriff, on 17 Sep 1874

The Margaret KELLY vs. Supervisors of Town of Maple Valley court Case apparently began 19 July 1886.

Margaret KELLY, wife of Patrick KELLY, died at age 74, on 3 Sep 1896, according to her death certificate.  Family tradition says that she suffered from tuberculosis and isolated herself from her family during her last years to try to prevent infecting other family members.

There has to have been some misunderstanding about her "death" referred to in the letter, because she was still alive in 1874 (date of letter) 

______________________________


Pat Kelly Family Cemetery History

The Pat Kelly Family Cemetery is located on the original Pat Kelly farm at Hickory , WI.  Pat Kelly was thought to have been one of the first white settlers in the Hickory Corners area arriving in the area about 1850.

The Pat Kelly Family Cemetery was located on land shown in the 1898 Maple Valley , Oconto County Plat book on land owned by the Gilligan brothers, who were the son’s of Thomas and Mary Kelly (Pat Kelly’s daughter) Gilligan.  The 1912 Oconto County Maple Valley Plat book, Township 29 N., Range 18 E, Section 12, shows that parcel of land being owned by George Gilligan, who was the oldest son of Thomas & Mary Kelly Gilligan.  The 1946 Oconto County Plat book shows the parcel of land being owned by Ed Smoot.  Family members state Ed Smoot mowed and maintained the cemetery for many years.  In the late 1940’s or early 1950’s, Clarence and Betty Ankerson purchased the property.    Their son, Clarence, currently farms the land. The Ankerson’s  removed the fence surrounding the cemetery, removed the apple orchard,  and the graves were plowed up and the land farmed.  It is also thought the Ankerson’s removed the “Witness Tree.” The story is told that as a Justice of the Peace Mr. Kelly was not perturbed by the lack of two witnesses to a marriage ceremony.  Joining hands of the bride and groom, he took them to a large elm tree which was a witness tree on a section corner and intoned, "Under this witness tree what Pat Kelly and God Almighty has joined together, let no man put asunder.  The couple’s initals were then carved in the tree.

 

The head stones were removed and deposited into a ditch near the Kelly Brook Cemetery .  Family member, Clifford Rice of Green Bay retrieved the stones, cleaned, and stored them in his garage for many years and has since placed them in the Kelly Brook Cemetery . The actual family remains, however, remain in the plowed Cemetery on the original Pat Kelly farmland.

 

Attempts to have Leslie Eisenberg of the State Historical Society Burial Sites Preservation Program intervene, inspect and stop the plowing of the cemetery as provided by The Burial Rights Preservation Program , have proven fruitless.

Wisconsin State Statute 157.70 addresses Burial Sites Preservation and the State Historical Society of Wisconsin enforces the statute. Leslie Eisenberg is the Director of the Burial Sites Preservation Program. 
Name: Eisenberg, Leslie E. 
Division: Director - Rm: 210 
Phone: 608-264-6401
Address: 816 State St.  
Madison , WI 53706-1482
Email: (click here) leeisenberg@mail.shsw.wisc.edu

If you would like to be registered as an interested party of the Pat Kelly Family Cemetery as provided by the Burial Sites Preservation Program-Wisconsin Statute 157.70, please email Leslie D. Eisenberg at email address above and encourage the Burial Sites Preservation Program Coordinator to investigate, identify, and record the Pat Kelly Family Cemetery in the catalog of burial sites in the State of Wisconsin.  Interested parties would like to see the Pat Kelly Family Cemetery restored to provide the dignity and respect that all human life should have, as provided for in the Burial Sites Preservation Program.


Graves Site Information:


Following is a diagram of the  Pat Kelly Family Cemetery as described to William Clifford “Bill”
Sloan in 1978 by Ellen Gilligan Ludeman of Laona,  Leola "Dolly" Gilligan Baccus of Fond du lac,
Elizabeth "Betty" Gilligan Conley of Laona, Evelyn “Toots” Gilligan Kesler of Kelly Lake,
and Bernard "Bun" Gilligan of Hickory Corners,  who were great grandchildren of Pat Kelly.
They grew up on the Tom and Mary Kelly Gilligan farm just ½ mile north of the Hickory Corners,
and visited the cemetery not far from their home many times.

--------------------->  Walk East to Ankerson house
  

Pat Kellly Family Cemetery

 

Members of family buried in   Pat Kelly Family Cemetery include:

 

Charlie Chamberllain

 

Margaret Elizabeth Kelly Chamberlain  18671891

(Pat Kelly’s daughter)

 

Margaret Jane Sloan  1893-1894          James Kelly  1853-1857

(Isabele Kelly Sloan's Baby)                     (Pat Kelly’s son)

 

Mary Isabelle Sloan  1895-1895            Margaret "Little Maggie" Kelly  1858-1858

(Isabelle Kelly Sloan's Baby)                   (Pat Kellys baby died in infancy)

 

Patrick Kelly  1815-1903                       Emily Kelly Kammer  1863-1894

                                                                 (Pat Kelly’s daughter)

 

Margaret Moore Kelly  1822-1896         George Kammer

(Pat Kelly's wife)                                    (Infant son of Emily Kelly Kammer)


9/23/96


Rolyn "Lee" Gilligan and Lyle Gilligan, son's of Bernard Gilligan,
ive in Hickory Corners.  Lee states that Tommy Gilligan and Howard
Gilligan, infant son's of his grandfather Thomas Gilligan,  are also
located in the cemetery.  Lee and Lyle also visited the cemetery as
children and have knowledge of where the cemetery was located.

Kelly Brook Cemetery :
Stones mentioned above are now located in the Kelly Brook Cemetery .  They can be found in the
north east corner near the Ann R. Yance, Wife of Gustave Yance,  head stone.  Anna Yance was
Pat Kelly’s daughter, Rose Anna Kelly.  The stones appear to have been hand made from concrete,
are about 2” thick by 6” wide and 12-14” long.  They
are placed flat in the ground to the right of
Anna Yance’s headstone.  They have the following initials etched in them:
E.K.   for
Emily Kelly Kammer
M.K.   for Margaret Kelly
M.C.   for Maggie Kelly Chamberlain
  


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