Port Washington Biographies

WILLIAM AHLHAUSER, County Treasurer, Port Washington; was born in the town of Mequon, Ozaukee Co., March 13, 1855; received a good common-school education at Saukville, his father being Postmaster of that place; he acted as clerk in the post office for a period of about six years, commencing in 1867. From 1876 to 1880, he acted as Deputy Town Clerk, during which time, in the fall of 1880, he was elected County Treasurer, which office he now holds. When he was about 10 years of age, he had the misfortune to injure his right knee-joint, from which, however, he nearly recovered, but in January, 1879, he again fell, and so strained the joint as to compel him to use crutches up to the present time.

J.N. BAER, Port Washington; was born in Germany in 1831; came to the United States in 1853, landing at Baltimore, where he resided one year. He then went to New York City, where he worked at his trade as cabinet-maker about three years, then continued the same at Boston, Mass., eighteen months, at the end of which time he went to Chicago, where he remained six months; he then went to Cairo, Ill., where he was employed as carpenter in the navy yards about five years; then spent one year at Memphis, Tenn., from which place, in 1866, he came to Wisconsin, living at Milwaukee two years, after which he came to Port Washington, and has since been engaged in the furniture business, in connection with which he has carried on a saloon since November, 1879. He is a Democrat. Has been Town Treasurer two years, and is a member of the Roman Catholic Church. Was married, in 1859, to Barbara Schoeck; they have six children - Bernard, Maggie, Lanie, Jacob, John and Leo.

HON. JOHN R. BOHAN, editor and publisher Port Washington Advertiser, was born at College Hill, near Templemore, County of Tipperary, Ireland, Dec. 7, 1824, after which he studied the Latin and Greek languages, and also learned engineering. In 1846, he emigrated to the United States, and first settled with his parents at Hartford, Washington Co., where he helped to clear the land and taught school. In 1852, was elected Clerk of the Board of Supervisors of Washington Co., and the new county of Ozaukee being organized therefrom, he remained Clerk of the latter until 1858; was a member of the Assembly in 1859, elected to the Senate in 1862, served as Clerk of the Court from January, 1865, to January, 1869, and, in the fall of 1871, was again elected to the Assembly. Has also held various local offices. In 1858, he purchased a one-third interest in the Port Washington Advertiser, and the year following purchased his partner's interest, and published the paper alone until 1865, when he took in F.J. Mills as a partner, and continued the paper under the firm name of Bohan & Mills until 1869, since which time Mr. Bohan has been sole proprietor. He married in 1852, to Miss Mary Sullivan, a native of Vermont; they have seven children living - Michael, Eunice, Matie, John, George Stanley, Frank and Maude.

E.B. BOLENS, editor and publisher, Port Washington; is among the oldest editors in Wisconsin, having been engaged in printing and publishing since 1849. He is a native of Ohio, born in 1830; received a collegiate education, and early turned his attention to his present profession. His first newspaper venture was at Toledo, Tama Co., Iowa, where, in 1856, he assisted in getting out the Toledo Tribune, the first paper in the county. He did the principal part of the editorial work, half of the typesetting, and all the press work. He sold out in 1858, and in 1860, went to Washington, Iowa, and established the Washington Democrat, which he continued until 1866, at which time he removed to Janesville, and established the Janesville Democrat. He continued its publication until 1869, when he removed to Juneau, and established the Dodge County Democrat, which he edited and published until October, 1874, when he leased the office for two years and went to Madison to enter upon the duties as State Printer, which office he filled for the years 1875 and 1876. In April, 1873, he established a monthly paper in the interest of the Granger movement, called the Beaver Dam Sun, which he moved with him to Madison, and continued for some time under the name of the Wisconsin Granger, as a weekly; then changed the name again to Statesman, dropping its grange feature, but discontinued its publication a few months thereafter. In 1877, he began the p publication of the Wisconsin Farm Journal, a strictly agricultural and literary paper, but soon discontinued it for want of proper support. In January, 1879, he went to Fond du Lac and engaged in the publication of the People's Champion, but soon severed his connection with it, and removed to Milwaukee, and for a few months edited the Daily News and the Daily Dispatch, after which he came to Port Washington and revived the Weekly Star, which he now edits and publishes. Of the papers with which he has been connected as proprietor, the following are yet published by his successors: Toledo Tribune, changed to Chronical; Washington Democrat; Janesville Democrat, now Times; Dodge County Democrat, now Juneau Telephone; People's Champion, now Standard, published at Oshkosh; Weekly Star, Port Washington. He has held the office of Mayor of Eaton, the county seat of his native county; Postmaster in Iowa, and State Printer in Wisconsin. In politics he is a Democrat, and has been quite active, participating as a campaign speaker in the Presidential elections of 1852, 1856, 1860, 1864, and 1868. In the campaign of 1860, he spoke nearly every day for two months, and mostly at out-door meetings by which he contracted a throat and lung disease which still troubles him very much. In 1868, he was the Democratic candidate for State Senator in Rock County against Hon. Charles G. Williams, now a member of Congress, which gentleman he challenged to a public discussion. He made over thirty speeches in Rock County that fall, and increased the Democratic vote from 600 to over 1,100, which has been maintained since. The effect of this severe work has been such that he has been compelled to almost wholly abstain from public speaking and consequently has taken a less active post in politics. Mr. Bolens has been twice married. March 10, 1853, to Elizabeth M. Trewsdale, a native of Ohio; she died in Toledo, Iowa, May 11, 1859. In 1861, to Sarah M. Brown, then of Iowa City, but formerly of Pennsylvania. They have three children living - Albert D., Harry W., and Josephine.

HON. C.E. CHAMBERLIN, Port Washington, is among the pioneers of Ozaukee Co. He was born in Catskill, Greene Co., N.Y., March 9, 1818; received a common-school education; learned the printer's trade, and, in 1839, went to Chenaugo Co., where he continued work at his trade, and from 1841 to 1843, was one of the publishers of the Oxford Republican, a Democratic paper; he then came to Wisconsin and first settled in Milwaukee; at that time, the city was in great need of a school in the Second Ward, and, as they had no schoolhouse, Mr. Chamberlin fitted up an old bowling alley, and taught a private school in it for a term of three months. He then acted as foreman in the printing office of the American Freeman; the following year, as he had previously entered a piece of land in what is now Mequon, Ozaukee Co., he moved onto it, and followed farming in that vicinity until 1857, during which time he served one term as County Treasurer and one term in the Assembly; he was then appointed Clerk of the Circuit Court by Judge Larabee, in the pace of Heidkemp, removed and, in the fall of said year, was elected to the same office, which he held one term. He then taught school most of the time until 1872, meantime taking up dentistry, which profession he still follows. In the fall of 1872, he was elected to the Assembly, and served one term; he then had charge of the office of Clerk of the Court, as Deputy, and, at the same time, did most of the writing in the office of the Register of Deeds; in the fall of 1876, was elected Clerk of the Court and served one term, after which he retired from public life. He was married to Eliza Hill, a native of Oxford, N.Y., on the 26th day of January, 1844, and now has six children - Charles A., Ella D., now Mrs. Alex Wood, of Spring Lake, Mich; Mary E., now Mrs. William Guy, of Wausau, Henry L., Benjamin F., and Nellie.

H. L. COE, Postmaster of Port Washington; was born in Le Roy, Genesee Co., N.Y., in 1836. At the age of 8 years, came with his parents to Port Washington; was educated at the Lawrence University at Appleton, and Carroll College, Waukesha; then followed farming and surveying until 1865; he then entered the law school at Albany, N.Y., where he graduated in 1866. Returning to Port Washington, he formed a law partnership with George W. Foster, with whom he continued until 1879, during which time, in 1871, they took in James Hedding as a partner, making the law firm Foster, Coe & Hedding, and continued until 1874, when Mr. Hedding withdrew, and G.C. Foster was taken in, making the firm Foster & Coe; in 1878, Mr. Coe withdrew from the firm and practiced alone until the fall of the same year, when, on account of poor health, he gave up law practice. In the fall of 1879, he was appointed Postmaster. In 1869, Mr. Coe, G.W. Foster and G.A. Rowe, purchased real estate in Kewanee Co., containing water-power, mill privilege, etc. which they improved by building a saw-mill, also a pier in the lake, and started a town, which they name Foscoro. Mr. Coe was married in 1862, to Miss Nettie E. Wilmot, a native of St. Lawrence County, N.Y.; they have three children - Clara, Florence R., and Mary.

FRANK DELLES, liveryman, Port Washington; is the son of John Delles, one of the oldest settlers of Ozaukee Co., having settled in the town of Belgium in 1846; was born in the town of Fredonia, May 24, 1849, and lived with his parents until 1869; he then spent two years at Sturgeon Bay,engaged in lumbering; returning to Ozaukee Co., he was in the employ of his father, who was engaged in hotel and livery; in 1876, he purchased his father's livery. He is a Democrat. Served as Under Sheriff during the years 1873 and 1874, as Sheriff in 1875-76, and again in 1879 and 1880, since which time he is again Under Sheriff. He was married, in 1873, to Mary Kessler, of Port Washington; they have two children living - Maggie and Frank.

PHILIP ECKEL, merchant; was born in Germany in 1824; immigrated with his parents to the United States in 1832; was shipwrecked off the coast of Charleston, S.C., but, in a few days, sailed for Philadelphia, where the family resided until 1837; then removed to Hancock, Md.; in 1839, returned to Pennsylvania and settled at McConnellsburg, where he learned the mason's trade. In 1849, he was married to Mary Kern. In the fall of 1854, he came to Port Washington; continued his trade and also taught school; since 1860, he has been engaged in the grocery business. The children living are William, John L., Henry K., Ida Susan and Rollo.

JUDGE LEOPOLD EGHART, Port Washington; one of the pioneers of Wisconsin; is a native of Austria, born in 1824; emigrated to the United States in 1849, and settled in Washington Co., purchased land and commenced farming, but as he was a single man, he did not admire the business, so in about three months he engaged in mercantile business at Newburg, which he continued about one year; in the fall of 1850, he came to Port Washington and engaged in the store of Joseph Goldsmith as clerk and book-keeper, with who he remained until 1859 with the exception of about eighteen months in the years of 1854-55, when he was engaged in mercantile business in Newburg. In 1859, he was elected Clerk of the Court, which office he held one term, when he again returned to the employ of Goldsmith; in 1867, he went to Cedarburg, and in partnership with Fred Horneffer, engaged in the mercantile business under the firm name of Horneffer & Co., and continued the same until 1875, at which time they dissolved partnership, and Mr. Eghart was employed as Deputy Postmaster, also acting as agent for insurance companies, sewing machines, etc.; in the fall of 1877, he was elected County Judge, which office he now holds, and was re-elected in the spring of 1881 without opposition. In 1850, he was married to Anna Horneffer, a native of Lancaster, Penn.; they have six children living - Ida, Adele, Emaly, Matie, Albert and Elsa.

GEORGE WARREN FOSTER, Port Washington; is the son of Jacob Foster, who was of English and Scotch descent and who was born in Connecticut. The subject of this sketch was born in Washington Co., N.Y., Sept. 13, 1817, and when 5 years of age, removed with his parents to the town of Mentz, Cayuga Co.; at the age of 15, he engaged in teaching (being then in appearance a young man of 18 or 19 years); in his 17th year, he again taught school, and his 18th year was spent by studying at home and reciting in the academy at Auburn, which was about five miles distant. In 1837, he entered the law office of Seward & Beardsley, afterward Porter & Beardsley, where he remained until the fall of 1841, during which time he served as Clerk of the Courts of civil and criminal jurisdiction; he then studied, with Judge Hulbert as preceptor, about one year, acting meantime as Deputy Clerk of the United States Court of the Northern District of New York, under Judge Conkling. In the fall of 1842, he entered the Yale Law School and remained one year, which was not a sufficient time to permit him to graduate, although he finished all the studies in the course. Before entering Yale College, he had saved about $1,000, and therefore, expected to be able to procure a fine library, but having loaned the money without good security, he lost it. After being admitted to the bar, on his return from college he practiced law at Port Byron two years, then came to Wisconsin, and, arriving at Milwaukee Sept. 21, 1845, opened a law office. But law was not a profitable pursuit there at that time. In December of that year, he went to Sheboygan Co., where he selected a piece of land and engaged to work in a lumbering camp for the purpose of procuring lumber to make necessary improvements upon it; he soon returned to Milwaukee to see that his library was well cared for; on his way back to the lumbering camp, he stopped at Hamburg (now Grafton), and, as he was a jolly fellow, he sang a song to assist in passing the time pleasantly, and being a good singer, of course interested all who heard him, and one of the crowd, Mr. Coe (afterward his father-in-law), introduced himself to Mr. Foster and requested him to apply for the Port Washington school, as they were in need of a teacher at that place, to which Mr. Foster replied, that he was already engaged in a lumbering camp, and therefore, could not afford to waste time on uncertainties; but Mr. Coe was so well pleased with him that he spoke to the School Board, and, in a few days, wrote Mr. Foster at the camp that he could have the school, and as Mr. Foster preferred teaching school to lumbering (not having done manual labor in several years), he at once came to Port Washington and accepted the school for a term of three months at $9 per month and board; and so it can be seen that the song he sang at Hamburg no doubt changed his future career. In the fall of 1846, he commenced surveying; also did conveyancing and who other law business came before him, and continued the same until the summer of 1847, when he was taken with inflammation of the eyes, and was unable to do business until the following December; he then resumed surveying, etc. and followed the same until 1849, by which time he had established quite a law practice, and therefore gave his entire time to his profession. In the spring of 1850, he purchased land on the Milwaukee River, built a saw-mill, started the present village of Waubeka, and the following winter returned to Port Washington; in May, 1879, he removed to Appleton, when his nervous system became so broken down as to compel him to drop his profession; he therefore returned to Port Washington in October, 1880, and as he has nearly recovered, he expects to resume law practice again soon. He is a Republican; he has been Justice of the Peace, and was appointed District Attorney in 1862. He was married Oct. 18, 1848, to Miss Mary E. Coe, a native of New York, born at Leroy, Genesee Co., N.Y., Oct. 23, 1830; they have had seven children, five of whom are living - George C., now a practicing lawyer of Florence; William M., a phonographer, employed in Milwaukee; Charles L., Annie S., and Freddie A., living at home.

JOHN GILSON, inventor and molder, Port Washington; his father is a native of Luxemburg; emigrated to the United States in 1848, and lived at Milwaukee until 1850, at which time he settled at Port Washington. The subject of this sketch was born in Milwaukee June 11, 1850, and as the family soon moved into Ozaukee Co., he has spent his life at Port Washington. At the age of 10 years, he entered his father's foundry and learned the molder's trade, which he still follows, and, since 1880, has been a partner with his father and brother. In 1879, he invented a stove-drum, which now has a good sale in several States, and subsequently, he invented a hame-fastener, which was patented May 10, 1881. He was married in August, 1873, to Lizzie Rappold, an adopted daughter of Hon. Eugene S. Turner; they have five children - Mary, Emma, Annie, Johnnie, and Maggie.

JAMES O'GORMAN, retired farmer, Sec. 18; P.O. Port Washington; a native of Ireland, born in County Kilkenny in 1815; emigrated to the United States in 1844, landing at Boston July 16; was a resident of the State of Massachusetts until 1848, at which time he came to Port Washington. He purchased his present farm of 80 acres, but soon went to Racine and worked as a common laborer until 1850, by which time he had saved money enough to permit him to commence farming, when he returned to Ozaukee Co.; in 1877, he let his sons work the place, and, in 1879, sold them the same. Mr. O'Gorman was married in 1848 to Bridget Doyle; they have three children - John, Garret and Mary. Religion, Roman Catholic.

JAMES HEDDING, attorney, Port Washington; was born in Clinton Co., N.Y., July 29, 1829. After receiving his education, he learned the millwright trade, and, in 1854, came to Wisconsin, first settling in Washington Co. In 1861, in partnership with John B. Kendall, he built the furniture manufactory at Waubeca, and operated the same under the first name of Kendall & Hedding about ten years, during which time, in 1864, he enlisted in Co. G, 1st W.H.A., and served until the close of the war. In 1871, he came to Port Washington, and has since been engaged in a general law and collection business, and is at present serving his second term as District Attorney. Was married in 1850, to Miss Catherine Ackers, a native of Clinton Co., N.Y.; they have five children - Rosamond, James, Adelbert, Fred and Lillie.

JOHN KAISER, boots and shoes; born in Luxemburg in 1844; received a common-school education; learned the shoemaker's trade, and, in 1870, emigrated to the United States, and worked at his trade at Chicago, Ill., and Menasha, Wis., about one year; then came to Port Washington and served in the employ of Andrew Hein one year; then in partnership with Jos. Winger, engaged in boot and shoe business, which they continued under the firm name of Winger & Kaiser for four years, when he sold to his partner, opened a new store and has since been doing business alone. He was married in 1873, to Catherine Delles; they have three children - John, Frank and Katie.

R. C. KANN, lumberman, Port Washington; was born in Cologne, Germany, May 4, 1841; was brought by his parents to the United States in 1844, and lived at Milwaukee until 1859, during which time, in 1854, his parents died of cholera, leaving him to take care of himself. In 1859, he came to Port Washington, and, in 1861, enlisted in Co. K, 16th W.V.I., and served one year,when he was discharged on account of physical disabilities. He then attended a commercial college at Chicago, where he graduated and, subsequently, returned to Port Washington and again clerked in a store until 1870, at which date he engaged in mercantile business and continued in same until 1874, when he began dealing in lumber. He does a business of about $15,000 annually. In 1868, he was married to Ella A. Lytle, a native of Washington Co., N.Y.; they have two children - Lottie A. and Richard C. Jr. Politics, Republican.

N. KEMP, firm of Kemp & Co., Port Washington; is a native of Luxemburg, Germany; born Dec. 20, 1827; received a common-school education; learned the blacksmith trade, and, in 1846, emigrated to America, and first settled in Kenosha Co., where he worked one year on a farm at $8 per month, then chopped wood at 25 cents per cord; worked at his trade. In 1849, helped operate the first eight-horse power threshing-machines in Dane Co. In March, 1850, he went across the plains to California, where he remained about eighteen months, and then returned to Kenosha Co. Sept. 22 was married to Miss Susan Kass, a native of Luxemberg, Germany, and soon afterward removed to Jackson Co., Iowa; purchased land and followed farming until 1856, when he again returned to Kenosha, and purchased a farm. In 1858, in partnership with John Deiderich, he engaged in a general mercantile business, which they carried on at Kenosha until 1860; they then removed to Port Washington, and continued the same until 1866, at which time Mr. D. sold his interest to Nicholas Poull, and the business was continued under the firm name of Kemp & Poull until 1870; the firm then built a malt house and ran the same until 1873, at which time Mr. Kemp purchased his partner's interest, and continued the business alone until fall, when he took in William H. Ramsey as a partner. He is married and has seven children - Elizabeth, Barbara, Kate, Mary, John, Melchur and Michael. Mr. Kemp and family are members of the Roman Catholic Church.

JOHN KESSLER, firm of Notting & Kessler; was born in Germany in 1838; came to the United States with his parents in 1844, and settled in Ozaukee Co., and lived on a farm with his parents in the town of Cedarburg. In February, 1865, he enlisted in Co. A., 62d Ill. V.I. and served until the close of the war. The year 1864, he spent railroading in Arkansas. In 1874, in partnership with Bernath Notting, commenced the hardware business in which they are now engaged. Mr. Kessler was married in 1871 to Mary Schait. Bernath Notting was born in Germany, in 1845; came to the United States in 1855; settled at Port Washington; followed painting three years, since which time he has worked at the tinner's trade. Was married in 1870 to Farona Cimmer; have two children - Lizzie and Mary.

ULRICH LANDOLT, Port Washington; is a native of Switzerland; born in 1822; emigrated to the United States in 1846, and lived in New York City until May, 1848, when he came to Wisconsin and settled in the town of Belgium, Ozaukee Co., which town at that time embraced nearly all of Ozaukee and Sheboygan Cos.; here he served as the first School Trustee, and followed farming until 1853, passing through all the hardships of pioneer life; he then removed to the village of Port Washington, and clerked in a store; also acted as forwarding clerk on the lake until 1858; then served as Deputy County Treasurer until 1862, when he was elected County Treasurer, which office he held two terms. In 1866, he engaged in flour and feed business, and continued the same until 1875, since which time he has been in the insurance business. Is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the A., F. & A.M., of which lodge he has been Secretary from 1856 to 1862, and since 1875.

WILLIAM H. LANDOLT, banker, Port Washington; was born in Heidelburg, Germany, in 1844; was brought to the United States by his parents in 1846; lived in New York City about two years, then came with his parents to Wisconsin, and has since been a resident of Ozaukee Co.; he received a good common-school education, and in April, 1861, enlisted in Co. C, 5th W. V.I., and served until the close of the war, taking part in a great many battles as he was with the Army of the Potomac the entire time; he received no wound to amount to anything until the battle of Sailor's Creek, April 6, 1865; here he received a gunshot wound just above the knee which necessitated amputation of his left leg near the hip; after the war he returned to Port Washington, but soon entered the commercial college of Milwaukee, where he graduated in 1866, and in the fall of the same year, was elected County Treasurer of Ozaukee Co., which office he held until 1872, since which time he has been the partner of James W. Vail in the Ozaukee County Bank, doing a general banking business under the firm name of James W. Vail & Co. In 1872, Mr. Landolt was married to Miss Elizabeth Kandihas, who died in September, 1879, leaving two children - Eddie, born Sept. 23, 1873, and Louise, Aug. 9, 1875.

S.C. LARSON, teacher and farmer, Sec. 19; P.O. Port Washington; was born in Norway in 1836; was educated in Norwegian and English languages; emigrated to the United States in 1844, and first settled in Chicago; in 1859, he attended Hathaway's Academy, after which he taught school winters and sailed summers until 1872; during which time in 1866, he removed to Port Washington; in 1872, he went to Michigan and followed book-keeping; also served as Town Superintendent of Schools until the fall of 1875; he then returned to Port Washington and has since lived on his present farm of 60 acres which he purchased in 1873; he still teaches school during the winter season. He was married in December, 1862, to Anna Olson; she died in January, 1866, leaving one child - Christian O. In April, 1871, he married his present wife, K. Maria Olson, a sister of his first wife; their children are Isaac Anton, Jess Thomas, Martin, Rachael Mariah, Gunhild Elizabeth, Carl August and Anna Johanna. Politics, Republican. Has been Justice of the Peace, and is at present Secretary of the Ozaukee County Agricultural Society, which was established in 1859. Mr. Larson took the census of Port Washington in 1880.

NICHOLAS MARTIN, is a native of Germany, born in 1817; learned the molder's trade. In 1847, was married to Mary Hanson, after which, in 1850, he came to the United States, and settled in Ozaukee Co.; he followed farming a part of the year 1850, since which time he has worked at his trade; in 1853, he purchased an interest in a foundry, and did business under the firm name of Gilson & Martin; in 1865, he sold his interest and opened his present foundry which he ran alone two years, since which time the firm has been Martin & Wester. In 1860, his wife died, leaving two children - Nicholas and Mary, and in May, 1862, he married his present wife, Margaret Wester. Mr. Martin is a Democrat, has held local office, and is a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

JAMES MC CARTHY, is a native of Newfoundland; born in 1825; received a common-school education and followed sailing until 1849, during which time, in 1848, he was married to Miss Mary Ann George, of Newfoundland; he then came to Port Washington, purchased 80 acres of land in Section 16 and lived on the same until 1868, since which time, has been living in the village of Port Washington. Mr. McCarthy has been Chairman of the Board of Supervisors, Assessor, Clerk of the Circuit Court from 1862 to 1866, member of Assembly, and is at present Justice of the Peace, Town Clerk and Deputy Clerk of the Circuit Court, which is good proof that he is highly esteemed by the citizens of his town.

AUGUST MEYER, firm of Meyer & Ackerman, Port Washington; was born in Baden, Germany, in 1840, and when 5 years of age was adopted into the family of his uncle, Dominck Meyer, with whom he emigrated to the United States in 1846; after living in Milwaukee one year, he settled in the town of Belgium, Ozaukee Co., where he remained until 1854, then came to Port Washington and in 1855, commenced work at the tinner's trade; in 1858, he went to Milwaukee where he followed his trade until 1860, then returned to Port Washington and served in the employ of John Desmond; in 1864, he purchased an interest in his employer's business and conducted the same one year under the firm name of John Desmond & Co., then sold his interest to O.P. Melin, and served in the employ of the new firm until 1867, at which time he opened a new hardware business and in 1869 took in Martin Ackerman as a partner, and has since continued the business under the firm name of Meyer & Ackerman; they now carry a stock of $8,000 to $10,000, which is the largest in the county. Mr. Meyer is a Democrat; was Register of Deeds one term, and is Chief of the Port Washington Fire Department. He was married in 1865 to Mary S. Ackerman. They have seven children - Anton, Leopold J., Martin, Mary Anna, Louisa, George, and Frank A.

HON. CHARLES G. MEYER, capitalist, Port Washington; one of the oldest settlers and most prominent men of Ozaukee Co.; was born in Saxony Feb. 3, 1827, and with his parents, came to the United States in 1843, landing at Milwaukee; with his brother, he started on foot for Mequon, Ozaukee Co., where they at once commenced clearing land, which business they followed in Ozaukee and Sheboygan Cos. until 1850; during that time, they cleared 1,400 acres for which they received $3.50 per acre and dinner, or $4 and board themselves; when they burned the brush, they received 50 cents extra; but all the work was done in one year's time. In 1850, he was married to Mena Beger, and followed farming in the town of Fredonia, where he had previously purchased land; in 1859, on account of his wife's poor health, he leased his farm, moved into Port Washington and served as County Clerk one term; then kept books for B. Blake until September, 1862; he then removed to Madison, where he kept the books for W. H. Ramsey, in the Bank Comptroller's office. In 1864, his wife died, leaving three children - C.E., now a merchant at Waubeka; Ernst and Herman (the later not living). In June, 1865, Mr. Meyer went to Germany, where he was married to Mena Helmert; returned to Wisconsin in November, and served as Deputy Register of Deeds of Dane Co., one year; he then removed to Watertown, and, in partnership with Charles Wegemann, engaged in the dry goods business, which was carried on under the firm name of Meyer & Wegeman about eighteen months; then removed the same to Waubeka, Ozaukee Co., where they continued until 1874, at which date they sold to Meyer & Witt; in the fall of 1872, Mr. Meyer was elected County Treasurer, which office he held for four consecutive terms, since which time he has been living a private life; he also served in the Assembly two terms. The children are Richard, Herman, Ernst and Martha.

CHARLES A. MUELLER, proprietor of Port Washington Tannery; was born in Germany in 1842; emigrated to the United States in 1854; lived in Detroit, Mich., one year, then came to Wisconsin, and first settled in Two Rivers, where he learned the tanner's trade, and, in 1861, came to Port Washington; continued his trade until 1863, when he commenced business at Sheboygan Falls, and continued the same at that place until 1872, since which time he has been in business in Port Washington; in 1880, he built his present tannery, which has all the latest improvements for making rough leather and now tans about 20,000 sides, uses 800 cords of bark, employs ten men, and does a business of $50,000 annually. Mr. Mueller was married, in 1866, to Barbara Wolf; they have five children - Louise, Charley, Harry, Louis and Ida.

JOHN NEUENS, was born in Luxemburg in 1831; emigrated to the United States in 1852; was a resident of Ohio about eighteen months, at the end of which time he settled in Port Washington and for about four years was in the employ of R. Blake, as foreman, building roads, etc., since which time he has been in the saloon business with the exception of two years, when he was at Waubeka, engaged in a flouring-mill. He is a Democrat; since 1868, has been Town Treasurer, and is at present Coroner, which office he has held for a number of years. He was married, in 1854, to Margaret Seil; their children are Louise, Minnie, Freddie, Sisilie and Otto.

F.H.J. OBLADEN, teacher, Port Washington; is a native of Prussia, born in 1824; emigrated to the United States in 1842, landing in the city of New York in the month of August; he at once proceeded up the Hudson River to Fort Plain; there he spent the winter, and in the spring removed to Utica, and, as he was educated in the English as well as the German language, he taught school one year, at the end of which time he came to Milwaukee, where he stopped with his old friend and schoolmate, Hubert Kurt, about two months; then came with his father to Ozaukee Co., and located land in the town of Belgium; here he helped his father clear several acres, but he concluded to go to Milwaukee and engage in some business which would furnish ready case; arriving in the city, he made arrangements to work for H. H. Harris at the rate of $6 per month and board, with the privilege of attending school one-half of each day, and, as he gave good satisfaction, he remained in Mr. Harris' employ until 1850, during which time he acted as book-keeper, and had his salary raised to $75 per month; in 1850, he returned to Belgium, Ozaukee Co., and taught school in that town until 1854; since which time he has been teaching in the school at Cornellsville, with the exception of four years, which time he spent as teacher in the Port Washington Schools, and one year which he spent in the United States service, he being drafted in 1862, into Co. C, 34th W.V.I., and mustered out as Lieutenant in 1863. Mr. Obladen was married, in 1850, to Margaret Poff, of Columbus, Wis.; they have six children - Hubert A. (a printer in Milwaukee), Helen, Margaret, Lizzie, Frank and John.

JOHN OLINGER, one of the leading merchants of Port Washington, was born Luxemburg, County Echternach, village Beaufort, Europe in 1838; when three years of age, his father died, and, as his mother was poor, he, when 10 years of age, went to work for farmers, which he continued until 23 years of age; the year 1863, he spent in Paris, and in 1864, emigrated to the United States and at once settled at Port Washington, where he worked at the carpenter's trade one year; then went north and worked in the mines of Lake Superior until September 29, 1865, when he returned to Port Washington and attended the public schools three months, after which he worked in the store of Joseph Goldsmith. In January, 1869, he was married to Theresa Pelt, daughter of Peter and Catharine (Schumacher) Pelt, and spent the following year in the employ of Mr. Pelt; on May 1, 1870, he removed to Manitowoc, where he engaged in business until December, 1872, when he returned to Port Washington, and has since been engaged in general mercantile business dealing extensively in farm produce, wheat, etc. etc. The children living are John, Peter, Mary, John, Katie, Mary, Theresa and Maggie.

WILLIAM A. PORS, attorney at law, Port Washington; a native of Hamburg, born No. 17, 1827; immigrated to the United States in 1849, and settled in Washington Co., where he followed farming one year; served as clerk in the Register of Deed's office one year; he then went to New Hampshire, and commenced the study of law wwith Stephen Crosby of Francistown, with whom he remained about one year, then went to Lowell, Mass., and continued his study, with Judge Crosby as preceptor, until December, 1853, at which time, on motion of B.F. Butler, he was admitted to the bar, and soon after returned to Port Washington, and has since been engaged in law practice. He was Draft Commissioner during 1862, and has been District Attorney several terms. He was married, in 1859, to Miss Ida Heinemann, a native of Hanover. They have one child - Emil C., now a practicing lawyer in Oshkosh.

N. POULL, merchant, Port Washington; a native of Luxemburg, Germany, April 18, 1832; learned the blacksmith's trade, and in 1848, immigrated to the United States, settling at Chicago, where he followed his trade until 1858, at which time he came to Port Washington; he was engaged in the saloon business eight years; he was then engaged in mercantile business with N. Kemp until 1870, at which time the firm built the malt-house and did a malting business, under the firm name of Kemp & Poull, until 1873, when he sold his interest to Mr. Kemp, since which time he has been doing a general mercantile business. He was married, in 1853, to Miss Barbara Adam, a native of Luxemburg; they have six children - Nicholas, George, Mary, Rosa, Julia and Louise. The members of the family belong to the Catholic Church.

M.G. RUPPERT, Port Washington; a native of Luxemburg, Germany; he was born in 1848, and the following year was brought by his parents to the United States, who came direct to Wisconsin and settled twelve miles north of Port Washington; here he grew up and attended school; in 1860, he went to Kenosha Co., where he following farming one year; he then returned to Port Washington and followed steamboating (as water boy) for one season. In the fall of 1862, he enlisted in Co. C., 34th W.V.I., and served one year, and March 19, 1864, he was re-enlisted as a veteran in Co. A., 38th W.V.I., and served until the close of the war; he was one of the first men who entered Fort Mahone at the time of its capture. Returning to Port Washington, he was appointed as Deputy Sheriff, which position he filled until the spring of 1866, at which time he resigned, went to Menominee, Mich., and served as porter in a boarding house about four months. Again returning to Port Washington, he clerked in a store one year, then went to Chicago and followed auctioneering; in 1869, he was called to Port Washington to act as Under Sheriff, in which capacity he served until the fall of 1872, when he was elected Sheriff and served one term; he then served as Under Sheriff until the fall of 1876, after which he following auctioneering and collecting about one year; in the fall of 1877, he was elected Clerk of Court, in which office he is now serving his second term; during the years 1871 and 1872, Mr. Ruppert also served as Town Clerk, and in 1872, collected the first money for the Port Washington harbor. In the summer of 1880, he took an extensive trip among the Rocky Mountains for the purpose of improving his health. On the 9th day of December, 1869, he was married to Miss Anna Flamming, a native of Luxemburg, Germany, born June 15, 1848; they have three children - Louise, Maggie and Rosa.

MAJ. JOHN C. SCHROELING, County Clerk; is a native of Germany; was born in 1816, and, in 1830, entered the military school; was in the war of 1848, serving as Lieutenant and afterward promoted Captain. In 1853, he immigrated to the United States and settled in Cedarburg, Ozaukee Co., where he was engaged in the grocery business, etc., until 1859, during which time, in 1854, he organized the Singer Society, the Cedarburg Rifle Company (of which he was Captain), and the Turner Society; he then came to Port Washington, engaged in hotel business, and, in December, 1859, organized the Singer Society, of which he was leader, and the following year he organized the Turner Society. May 14, 1861, he was commissioned as First Lieutenant of Co. C, 5th W.V.I., and in December of the same year, was promoted Major of the 3d W.V.C., and served until March, 1865. Returning home, he was appointed Deputy Register of Deeds, and, in the fall of the same year, elected Register of Deeds, which office held two terms. He was proprietor of the Union House from 1868 to 1875. In 1872, he was elected County Clerk, which office he has since held. He was married in 1843, to Margaret Mordhorst. They have nine children, only one of whom is living - Minnie, now Mrs. John Druecker, of Chicago.

HENRY B. SCHWIN, Port Washington; was born in Prussia March 1, 1844, and, in 1845, was brought by his parents to Ozaukee Co.; at the end of one year, the family moved into Washington Co., where he was educated in both English and German languages, and helped upon the farm until 1863; he then attended the State University, Madison, three terms, after which he followed teaching school until 1874, at which time he removed to Port Washington, and has since been keeping the Union House in partnership with John Sievers. He was married, in 1869, to Miss Barbara Brenner, a native of New York State, born in 1849; they have five children - Mary, Katie, Lena, Rosa and Amelia. Mr. Schwin is a Democrat in politics. Was Town Clerk and Justice of the Peace in Washignton Co., which offices he resigned on removing to Ozaukee Co., and is at present serving his fourth term as Justice of the Peace of Port Washington.

JACOB SCHUMACHER, proprietor of Port Washington Marble and Granite Works; is a son of D. Schumacher, a native of Luxemburg, who emigrated to the United States in 1854, and settled at Port Washington. Here Jacob was born in 1857, and received a common-school education in both English and German. At the age of 18, he commenced work at his trade as marble worker, which he completed at St. Louis, Mo., in 1878. Since that time, he has been engaged in business at Port Washington. He has four brothers living - Frank, Nicholas, Toner and John, all of whom are older than he.

LA FAYETTE TOWSLEY, lawyer; was born at Williamstown, Oswego Co., N.Y., July 8, 1824; was reared on a farm, and attended district school until 16 years of age. He then clerked for a small trader a short time, and subsequently attended the Mexico Academy; read law in the office of Munger & Stewart, at Camden, N.Y.; taught school for three winters, receiving one of the first certificates, and that a perpetual one, issued under the County School Superintendent's system of New York. After engaging in one or two enterprises, and meeting with but poor success, about Aug. 1, 1847, he came to Port Washington. He taught the village school the following winter, and the year after was admitted to practice as an attorney at law; was elected Clerk of the Court the same year, and held the office three terms; has been District Attorney Clerk, Chairman, Justice of the Peace, Court Commissioner, and is at present County Surveyor, which office he has held with one exception for twenty (20) years. He has been a Democrat for the last twelve or fifteen years, but takes little interest in local politics. He was married, Sept. 1, 1851, to Miss Martha J. Calkins at Richland, N.Y. The children are Alice J., Fredrick A., Charles D., Henry A. and Robert B. Charles is a cadet at West Point; Fredrick A. is married and resides in Kaukauna. Mr. T. owns the suburban residence on the hill just west of the depot, where he has resided for the last twenty-nine years.

HON. EUGENE S. TURNER, was born in East Oswego, N.Y., June 14, 1824. His father was Hon. Joseph Turner, who was married to Mary Griswold, at Sangerfield, Oneida Co., N.Y., in 1816. He served honorably in the last war with Great Britain and received in later years his bounty and pension for the same. The father died at Menasha in 1874, after nearly sixty years of public service. The mother is still living at the advanced age of 85 with her oldest son, Dr. Joseph H. Turner, at Berlin, Wis. The 11th of May, 1840, the parents, with their family of one daughter and four sons, Eugene being the third in years, arrived at Milwaukee Bay and landed; within three weeks from that time, they had located upon 320 acres of Government land, three miles west of Prairieville (now Waukesha), where they built a log house and lived for two years, until a frame house could be provided. There were at that time but three settlers' houses on the trail between their cabin and Aztalan on Rock River, west, a distance of thirty miles. For nearly four years, the subject of this sketch toiled early and late on that new farm in a manner such as none but pioneers can endure or understand, with a thousand youthful annoyances, hindrances, hopes and pleasures interspersed. He had been thus far educated at private schools and at the Oswego Academy, but during all of this period of toil, and afterward, he laid under contribution every available resource to prepare himself for the legal profession. After nearly two years in the office of Hon. Alexander W. Randall, afterward Governor and Postmaster General, he spent nearly a year in Milwaukee as Deputy Clerk of the United States District Court under Cyrus Hawley, Esq., and in the law office of Messrs. Tweedy & Crocker, Mr. Tweedy then being the delegate from Wisconsin Territory in Congress until June, 1846, when he, with Hon. A. R. R. Butler, of Milwaukee, passed a creditable examination and was admitted to the bar in that city. In the autumn of that year, he located at Grafton, Washington Co. In the succeeding winter Session of 1846-47, he was at Madison, Assistant Secretary of the Territorial Executive Council under the then celebrated Thomas McHugh. With his pay for this service, he bought the commencement of a law library. In 1848, he was a candidate for District Attorney of Washington County, but was defeated a few votes by Samuel H. Alcox. In 1849, after a severe and very spirited contest, on account of his youthful appearance, he was elected to the legislative Assembly, where he served the succeeding winter with credit, and some notoriety in the contest on the county seat question, and as Chairman of the Finance Committee of the House. He gave marked evidence of a very successful future political career. In 1850, he was Democratic nominee and elected District Attorney for Washington County, over Leland Stanford by a majority of more than 600; Stanford was then practicing law in Port Washington. Soon after his defeat, he moved to California and subsequently became the wealthiest individual on the Pacific Coast. He has been Governor of California; was one of the projectors and the first President of the Union Pacific Railroad, and drove the golden spike which bound with an iron band the Atlantic to the Pacific. He is now the President of that corporation. The salary of District Attorney at that time was fixed at $300 per year, but so efficiently had they been performed, and so regardless of personal considerations, that the County Board voted Mr. Turner a bonus of $100. In 1852, Mr. Turner was again the regular Democratic nominee for District Attorney, and for his outspoken zeal in behalf of friends and of local measures, his canvass was so close that he was regarded as defeated, until the official count two weeks after election.
In 1853, Washington Co. was divided, and Mr. Turner was by no means idle in opposing what was to him known as a flagrant violation of the popular will; he continued actively opposed to the operation of the law for a division until he had fully tested the constitutionality of the act of the Supreme Court at the June term, 1853, in a mandamus on Circuit Judge Larrabee (See 1st Wisconsin Reports, p. 200, reported as Powers vs. Larrabee), it was really E. S. Turner vs. Larrabee; but afterward two separate motions for a mandamus were combined, and as such presented to the Court; this question having been settled by the highest authority in the Commonwealth, Mr. Turner advised and acted a full acquiescence without changing his own view of its merits, or of the legal or constitutional questions involved. The different localities competing for the permanent location of the county seat had caused divisions among the voters, and really controlled and influenced them in the election for ten years, and led to the division act, in all of which contest, from 1845, Mr. Turner had borne a prominent part.
After the division of the county became a fixed fact, there was one more question to settle, and that was the constitutional question as to the location of the county seat of the county of Ozaukee, under the division act, Mr. Turner claiming that it should be at Grafton. This question was fully tested in the Supreme Court at the December term, 1853 (see Wis. Sup. Court Reports, Vol. II, page 542, Att'y Gen. ex-rel. E.S. Turner vs. John Fitzpatrick), in which Mr. Turner made an able argument sustaining his view of Sec. 8 of Article 13 of of the State Constitution. In the summer and autumn of 1854, he made a trip to Europe on business and pleasure combined, and traveled extensively in Great Britain and on the Continent. In the fall of that year, he was again elected District Attorney, and served another term of two years. In 1856, having lost confidence in the administration of State affairs, and viewing with distaste the uncertainty of political recognition for merit, he in a great measure withdrew from political activity and devoted himself to his profession and business therewith connected; but was always found pronounced and certain on all the important measures of the day. At the breaking-out of the rebellion, and all through the war, he was for its suppression by furnishing men
and means without limit or carping criticism, and even after the war closed it has been his frequent boast, "that during those troublesome times, his voice was never known to give forth any uncertain sound, and that he had never been known to draw a disloyal breath." In 1862, he was among those drafted from Ozaukee Co. After three weeks remaining in Camp Washburn, near Milwaukee, he had a recurrence of rheumatism, of which he had been for weeks at a time in his pioneer life a sufferer, and became satisfied that he could not endure army life, and so procured a subsititue; that same year, in September, he had helped at Janesville to organize what was then distinguished as the War Democracy; it afterward became entirely merged in and made a permanent success of the Republican Party of the State, and ever since such a union, he has been known and recognized throughout the State, as thorough, active, and certain Republican in the stronghold of Democracy, ever ready to aid his party organization with time and means and argument; but never asking or accepting any political patronage therefor. In 1863, he moved to Port Washington, retaining a large share of the real estate that he had accumulated in and near Grafton; he has remained at Port Washington since that time in the constant attention upon his professional business, except two years and a half that he spent with his family in Chicago and Waukesha, and a place that he had built up and largely invested in on the east short of Lake Michigan called Turner's Port. As a lawyer and advocate, he has made more than an average success. The preserved records of the courts of Washington and Ozaukee and adjoining counties, and the volumes of his own printed arguments and the files of his written arguments and briefs attest his perseverance and ability, and furnish an ecomium greater than any written biography. There are many of a lawyer's ablest and most effective and creditable efforts that never make any distinctive mark in any history, and in a brief period are even lost to a casual remembrance. In addition to his professional engagements, he assisted gratuitously on the editorial pages of almost every one of the fifteen papers that have been published in Washington and Ozaukee Cos., and has been a regular correspondent for some of the larger city dailies, besides having had the principal agency in establishing three of them within the present limits of Ozaukee Co. He has been frequently sought after for lectures, addresses and papers, on a great variety of subjects and occasions, rarely failing to respond with laborious and well-considered effort. Although certain and emphatic in speech, or with the pen, it can be said of him, as of but few, that he has very seldom if ever placed upon paper, or inprint, any of his utterances in a manner that might cause him future annoyance. Mr. Turner was married, in 1850, to Frances H.E., eldest daughter of Elijah Gove, of Waukesha, by whom he has had four children, only two of whom survive. They are both daughters and are settled in life. He has ever been temperate and a promoter of religious and moral efforts, careful not to carry such sentiments to the extent of narrowness or bigotry, and although uniting with other denominations cheerfully and cordially in their services, has always been in sentiment and views of church discipline a Baptist. In fact, in all of his life's work, whether at the bar or otherwise, a measure, a principle with him, has uniformly taken the lead to the exclusion of personal considerations of himself or others, at the same time, he was facetious without being offensive in character. Below the medium height in stature, but while fearless, was winning and persuasive in business or personal intercourse. Verily, the world will be better for his having lived. But for his care in the preservation of files of papers and law documents, and his memory to explain events, a liberal share of the general and of the special histories within these pages would have been wanting and lost to the future reader.

JAMES W. VAIL, stands conspicuous among the prominent men of Washington and Ozaukee Counties, both on account of his character and success in life. His forefathers were among the Quakers, who landed on the shores of America some two hundred years ago. His parents were natives of the State of new York, and he was born in Onondaga Co. in 1826. His early years were spent attending common schools and neighboring academies; and, at the age of 17, he turned his attention to printing, which trade he learned and followed, with the exception of one year, which he spent at the State Normal School at Albany until 1848, when he came to Port Washington. During the first year, he did not engage in any particular business; and in July, 1849, returned to New York, where he remained until fall. Again coming West, he worked a short time at Sheboygan; then went to Madison, and was employed in the printing office of Beriah Brown until the following spring at which time he purchased an interest in the Washington County Blade, published at Port Washington, with which he was connected until the spring of 1853, when he sold his interest to his partner R.A. Bird. At this date, Washington Co. was divided; the new county of Ozaukee formed, and Mr. Vail appointed Deputy County Treasurer under John Fitzpatrick who left him in special charge of the office. While serving in this capacity, he was also Deputy County Clerk, and in those years laid the foundation for his future career. It was then that he commenced loaning money, furnishing exchange to merchants, etc.; and, in 1856, in partnership with S.A. White and Lyman Dowd, established a bank; but when the panic of 1857 came on, his partners withdrew, and so Mr. Vail continued the business alone, meeting with marked success; in 1873, he associated William H. Landolt with them as a partner with whom he has since continued doing a general banking business, under the firm name of James H. Vail & Co. Mr. Vail has been intrustedwith several important financial transactions, the most prominent of which are administrator of the large estate of Judge S. A. White (his former partner), of Whitewater; executor of the estate of George C. Daniels, and guardian of some of the minor heirs of Henry Thien. On the 4th day of April, 1861, E. Schumacher & Sons, proprietors of the Western Malleable and Gray Iron Works Foundry, made an assignment; and, as Mr. Vail had claims to the amount of several thousand dollars on the same, he associated H. W. Lyman with him as a partner, re-opened business under the firm name of H. W. Lyman & Co., and, as soon as matters can be got into proper shape, expect to employ 125 men. Mr. Vail is an active member of the Republican party. He was married, in 1859, to Miss Celestia M. Beals, then of Port Washington, but formerly of Michigan, and they now have three children - Mary B., Frank W. and James D.

PETER WATRY, farmer, Sec. 19; P.O. Port Washington; was born at sea during the voyage of his parents to this country, June 19, 1847, and spent his younger years on a farm in the town of Belgium. In 1867, he was married to Catherine Young, and purchased his present farm of 80 acres, and has since been working the same. The children are John, Domnic, Peter, Anna, Nicholas, Elizabeth, Leo, Frank. Is a Democrat, and is at present Assessor, which office he has held since 1877. He is also a member of the Roman Catholic Church.

THEO. J. WERLE, son of Jacob and Catherine (Mampel) Werle. He was born at Port Washington, Nov. 9, 1862; received a common school education in both English and German languages, also studied music, and, in February, 1881, entered the post office as Clerk and now has entire charge most the the time. Mr. Werle is a bright young man of good habits and one who has many friends.

JOHN P. WEYKER, Sheriff, Port Washington; was born in Belgium Dec. 10, 1836; brought to the United States by his parents in 1848; lived in the town of Belgium, Ozaukee Co., until 1865; then came to Port Washington; served as Under Sheriff one term; then as Constable two years, and as Jailer six months, at the end of which time he went to Peshtigo, where he followed lumbering and railroading. In 1871, he was burned out by the great prairie fire. He then returned to Ozaukee Co., and leaving his family in the town of Belgium, returned to Peshtigo and followed lumbering until June, 1872; he then began farming and railroading in Ozaukee Co. until December, the following year, when he was employed in the lumber yards of Port Washington, and worked in a store; since October, 1874, he has been engaged in saloon business. He was Under Sheriff during the years 1877 and 1878; and, in the fall of 1880, was elected Sheriff. He was married in 1858, to Anna Lecher, a native of Holland; they have had twelve children, only four of whom are living - Margaret, now Mrs. Hubert Knepprath, of Milwaukee; Nicolas, Susan and Peter.

MICHAEL WEYKER, dealer in general merchandise, Port Washington; is a native of Luxemburg, Germany; born in December, 1836; emigrated to the United States in 1847, and lived with his parents in the town of Belgium, Ozaukee Co. until 1860, at which time he was married to Elizabeth Wester; then purchased land and followed farming about two years; then lived near Lake Superior one year when he returned to Belgium and continued farming. In 1868, he again came to Port Washington, and in partnership with his brother, J. P. Weyker, did a general mercantile business under the firm name of Weyker Bros. In 1879, he purchased his brother's interest and has since conducted the business alone. he is a Democrat in politics; has been Treasurer of the town of Belgium, and is a member of the Roman Catholic Church. The children living are John, Nicholas, Melchur, Mary, John P., Rosa, Lizzie, Michael and Margaret.

REV. FR. HENRY WILMES, Port Washington; was born in Luxemburg, Germany, Dec. 25, 1844; emigrated to the United States in 1857; came direct to Wisconsin, first settling in Dodge Co. In 1860, he entered St. Francis Seminary, near Milwaukee, and December, 1868, was ordained as priest, and was first stationed at Sun Prairie, where he remained until 1870, when he came to Port Washington , and has since been pastor of St. Mary's Church.

N. YOUNG, Port Washington; one of the early settlers and leading druggists of Ozaukee Co.; is a native of Belgium, born in 1834; he came to the United States with his parents in 1851, and came direct to Port Washington; he helped his parents on the farm four years, then clerked in the store of Young & Kaehler two years, after which he had charge of the branch business of B. Blake, at Blakeville, until the spring of 1864; he then returned to Port Washington, and carried on a drug business in partnership with M. Audier for about four years, at the end of which time he sold his interest to his partner, and soon after embarked in the drug business alone. He was married in November, 1860, to Miss Theresa Wunderle, a native of Ohio, born April 21, 1839; they have nine children living - Lizzie T., Rosa I., Clara H., Edward N., George A., Anna R., Frances A., Emma A. M. and Amelia.

A. ZASTROW, proprietor of the American House, Port Washington; is a native of Pomerania, Prussia, born December, 1835, came to the United States in the spring of 1852, and lived near Milwaukee one year; then came to Ozaukee Co. and followed farming at Grafton three years; then went to Sheboygan Co. and continued farming; also kept hotel about four years, after which he returned to Ozaukee Co.; in the spring of 1862, he rented the American House, which he ran two years; then sold goods in the northern part of Michigan one season, after which he was engaged in mercantile business at Port Washington; in 1871, his store was destroyed by fire, and he went to California, where he remained eighteen months; returning to Port Washington, he engaged in photographing, which he continued until 1879, since which time he has kept the American House. He was married in 1856, to Miss Agnes Schroeling.

WALTER ZASTROW, Register of Deeds, Port Washington; a native of Pomerania, Prussia; born in 1837; emigrated to the United States in the spring of 1852, and first settled in Milwaukee Co., where he followed farming until the fall of 1853, at which time he came to Ozaukee Co., purchased land in Grafton, and commenced farming; in the fall of 1860, he went to New Ulm, Minn., and April 29, 1861, enlisted in Co. H., 1st Minn. V.I., and served three years; he then returned to Ozaukee Co., organized a company, of which he was commissioned Captain, and was assigned to the 52d W. V. I., and served until the close of the war. Returning to his home at Grafton, he followed farming until 1868, at which time he sold his farm, moved into the village of Port Washington and acted as clerk in the Register of Deeds office about one year; he then took a trip to California, where he remained about two and one-half years, when he returned to Port Washington; engaged in hotel business, also cigar manufacturing until 1876. In 1879, he was elected Register of Deeds, which office he now holds. He is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Sons of Hermann.

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