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James W. Carey

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, December 31, 1928. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

James W. Carey

James W. Carey, 309 South Illinois avenue, for five years employed as salesman by Normington Bros., launderers, but who since last October had been a local solicitor for the Prudential Insurance company, passed from life at St. Michael's hospital shortly after 3 o'clock this morning, following a week's illness with pleuro-pneumonia. He and Mrs. Carey spent part of Sunday afternoon, a week ago, visiting neighbors, but shortly after their return home, Mr. Carey became ill and called a physician. His condition did not improve during the night and the next morning he was removed to the hospital. Both lungs had become infected by this time and despite the best of care and attention, he gradually grew weaker until death came to his relief.

The deceased, who was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Carey of the town of Lanark, was born on the old farm 32 years ago last February 25 and grew to young manhood there. Shortly after the breaking out of the World war he enlisted for service and was sent to Camp Shelby, where he was on duty until the signing of the Armistice, when his company was sent overseas and served as guards in Germany for upwards of a year.

Six years ago last November Mr. Carey was married to Miss Ida Persike of Almond and they recently completed the erection of a stucco-cement cottage on Illinois avenue, one of the most attractive homes in that part of town.

Besides the widow and his parents, there are a brother and a sister, Daniel Carey and Mrs. Hiram Clinton, both of Lanark.

Because of the embargo on public gatherings on account of the local influenza epidemic, private funeral services for Mr. Carey will be held at the Boston funeral home at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. The body will then be put in the Boston vault and interment made next spring.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, January 3, 1929:

Last Rites Wednesday

The funeral of James W. Carey, Portage county native and resident of this city for several years, who expired from influenza and pneumonia at St. Michael's hospital, had the final rites said in his honor on Wednesday afternoon, when services were conducted at the Boston funeral home by Rev. Rufus Hudtloff and hymns were sung by the choir of St. Paul's Lutheran church. The body was then placed in the Boston vault to await interment next spring.


Robert Carey

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, December 14, 1932. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Robert Carey

Robert Carey of the town of Lanark died Suddenly at his home at Lanark Tuesday morning. Funeral services will be held at 10 o'clock Friday morning at St. Patrick's church at Lanark.

Fred B. Richmond, 403 Brawley street, is an uncle of Mr. Carey.

Surviving Mr. Carey are his widow, one son Dan Carey of Buena Vista, one daughter, Mrs. Lettie Clifton of Lanark, and one sister, Mrs. Alice Osborne of Waupaca. A son, James Carey, of Stevens Point, died two years ago.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, December 17, 1932:

Funeral at Lanark

Funeral services for Robert Carey of the town of Lanark, who died suddenly Tuesday morning of a heart attack, were held at 10 o'clock Friday morning at St. Patrick's church, Lanark, Rev. DeLoyd Krembs officiated at a requiem mass and burial took place in the parish cemetery.

Dan Hickey, West street, Stevens Point, who is a brother-in-law of Mr. Carey, attended the services.

Mr. Carey was born in Lanark on September 15, 1855, and with the exception of three years in Waupaca, had spent his life in that township. He followed the occupation of farming. His marriage to Miss Mary Anne Hickey of Lanark took place on November 20, 1893, and they became the parents of three children, James, who passed away four years ago, Mrs. Hiram Clinton of Lanark and Dan Carey of Buena Vista.

Mr. Carey is also survived by his widow and one sister, Mrs. Edward Osborne of Waupaca.


Ellen Ryan Carmody

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, March 8, 1905. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Ellen Carmody, widow of the late Michael Carmody, and one of the pioneers of this county, died at Nekoosa, yesterday, where she had been living for a few years, and the remains will be brought here at 10 o'clock tomorrow for interment in St. Stephen's cemetery.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, March 15, 1905:

Was a Pioneer Resident

The remains of Mrs. Ellen Carmody, whose death at Nekoosa was briefly mentioned in these columns last Wednesday afternoon, arrived here at 10 o'clock Thursday morning and funeral services were held at St. Stephen's church, Rev. W. J. Rice officiating. The remains were accompanied here by Mrs. Neal Crowns, niece of the deceased, and her son, George, Mr. Crowns being obliged to remain at home on account of their daughter being ill. Mrs. Carmody was a native of Ireland, about 80 years of age, and came to this country when a young woman. She was married to Michael Carmody at St. Lawrence, Mass., and they lived in Canada thereafter for a time, but about 49 years ago came to Stevens Point and located in the town of Hull, a few miles north of the city. Nearly 30 years ago they sold out and came to town, the husband dying in 1895. Her maiden name was Ellen Ryan, and a brother, John Ryan, died a number of years ago in Buena Vista. She was a remarkably active woman and always enjoyed good health until about one week before her death, when she was seized with intestinal and stomach troubles, sinking rapidly. For the past five years she had lived with her niece at Nekoosa, and was a keen, witty woman, one who always looked upon the bright side, and will be well remembered by pioneer residents of this section.


Michael Carmody

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, July 25, 1894. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

MICHAEL CARMODY

In the death of Michael Carmody, one of the oldest residents and best known characters of Stevens Point has passed away. He had been ailing more or less for the past seven months, but was able to be up and around nearly every day, walking from his home on the south end of Church street, Sixth ward, to the business part of the South Side, as late as last Thursday morning. Mr. Carmody grew weaker very rapidly after that and on Sunday was scarcely able to arise from his bed. About ten o'clock Sunday night it was noticed that his life was fast ebbing away, and at fifteen minutes to three o'clock Monday morning he breathed his last. Mr. Carmody first saw the light of day in County Tipperary, Ireland, about 86 years ago. Leaving the "old sod" when a young man, he worked in England, Canada and several eastern states and some fifty-five years ago he was married to Miss Ellen Ryan at Lawrence, Mass. Thirty-eight years ago they came to Stevens Point, having in their possession about $100 of Georgia state bank money, but $20 of which would be accepted by our business houses. After laboring for several months, Mr. Carmody earned sufficient money to buy a 200-acre tract of land in the town of Hull, where they lived fifteen years or more, and some twenty-one years ago sold their farm and came back to this city. While a resident of our northern town, Mr. Carmody held the office of justice of the peace, and many is the good story told about the proceedings of "Carmody's Coort." He always maintained that no appeal could be taken from his decisions--there was no court higher than Carmody's court. But he was in every sense an honest, well-meaning man. Two children were born to them, both of whom died in infancy and besides his aged wife, no known relatives are living. The funeral took place from St. Stephen's church at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning, Rev. W. J. Rice officiating, with interment in St. Stephen's cemetery. The pallbearers were Jas. O'Brien, Geo. P. Nugent, Jas. Glennon, Chas. VanHecke, Tim. Sullivan and Jas. Murphy.


Matilda Patrykus Carpenter

Reprinted from the Wisconsin Rapids Daily Tribune, Wednesday, August 24, 2005. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Matilda 'Tillie' Carpenter

Matilda "Tillie" Carpenter, 96, formerly of 2521 10th Street S., Huntington House, died Monday morning, Aug. 22, 2005, at Bethel Nursing & Rehab Center in Arpin.

Services will be held at 11 a.m. Thursday at St. Lawrence Catholic Church in Wisconsin Rapids. The Rev. Chester Osowski will officiate. Burial will be in St. Martins Cemetery in the Portage County town of Almond.

Tillie was born March 4, 1909, in Bancroft to Michael and Matilda (Wendt) Patrykus. She married Edwin Carpenter in 1932 in the town of Almond. He died in 1972.

She retired from the Wood County Telephone Co. after 22 years as a telephone operator.

She is survived by five daughters, Marcia (Edward) Hellner, Elaine (Jack) Skibba and Lynda Zager, all of Wisconsin Rapids, Margaret Sorenson of Largo, Fla., and Kathleen (Robert) Knoll of Pittsville; 23 grandchildren; 41 great-grandchildren; and three great-great-grandchildren.

Tillie was a member of the Blue Army and Ladies of St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church, Wisconsin Rapids. She loved flowers and gardening, playing cards and was a friend to children. She enjoyed family gatherings and celebrations.

She was preceded in death by two sons and a daughter (all infants); her parents; seven brothers, Edward, Michael, Joe, Ray, George, Ben and Al; and one sister, Margaret Rodeghier.

Friends may call at Higgins Funeral Home from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday and at the church on Thursday from 10 a.m. until the time of services.

The family will lead a prayer service at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday evening at the funeral home.

A video tribute may be seen at http:higginsfuneralhome.net.


Dewitt Clinton Cate

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Weekly Journal, Monday, February 19, 1934. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

D. Clinton Cate

D. Clinton Cate, age 73 years, a prominent farmer of Portage county and member of a pioneer family, passed away at his home in the town of Stockton Saturday afternoon at 5:45 o'clock. He had been a continuous resident of Stockton all of his life.

Mr. Cate had been in poor health for many years. He was confined to bed for the past four weeks.

The birthplace of Mr. Cate was the farm where he lived continuously all of his life, the homestead that his parents, the late Mr. and Mrs. Henry Cate, bought from the government 80 years ago. The date of his birth was January 23, 1861. He was a nephew of the late Judge George Cate, who was Circuit judge here for many years.

Mr. Cate was married to Miss Mary Costick of the town of Stockton on April 24, 1900, at St. Peter's church, Stevens Point.

Surviving are his wife, one son and two daughters, Francis L. Cate, who is expected to arrive here from his home at Seattle, Washington, Tuesday afternoon, Mrs. Harold Bergholte, 448 Normal avenue, and Mrs. Seth Cain, Broadhead. One son died in infancy. He is also survived by two brothers, Walter S. Cate of Ashland and George Cate of Phoenix, Arizona, and one granddaughter, Margaret Bergholte. Miss Ruth Cate and Lynn Cate, 1026 Clark street, Mrs. G. M. Dahl of New York city, Mrs. William Cronwyn of Milwaukee and Henry B. Cate of Phoenix, Arizona, are cousins of the deceased.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock at the family home in Stockton. Rev. Joseph Shaefer will officiate and burial will take place in St. Stephen's cemetery here.


Henry Cate

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Saturday, September 2, 1893. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

PASSED TO THE OTHER SIDE

The death of Henry Cate occurred at his residence in the town of Stockton at 12 o'clock last Tuesday noon. For the past fifteen years Mr. Cate had been suffering to a considerable extent from rheumatism. About two years ago he had an attack of diabetes. From this attack he appeared to recover, but for about a year and a half he has been able to do but little work, the rheumatic troubles have apparently affected the heart. During nearly all of this time, however, he was able to be about, and up to the very morning of his death retained general supervision of his farm work. During the haying season he insisted, against the advice of his sons, in driving the mower for a time, and since then had not been as well as he was before. He told the doctor that he thought the jar of the machine was injurious, but even as late as last week he was able to go over to the town house and preside at a meeting of the town board, of which he was chairman. On Monday of this week he was up and about the yard, but on Tuesday morning there was a marked change for the worse. The disease seemed to have gone more directly to the heart. He suffered a good deal from pain in his chest, his breathing became difficult and he rapidly grew weaker until he finally sank into that last sleep which awaits us all. Although his health had been poor for so many months, his family had no idea that the end was so near. Besides Dr. John Phillips, who arrived about half an hour before, those at his bed side when the final summons came were his wife and three sons, one of the latter having returned from Chicago a short time before his death.

Henry Cate was born on a farm near Montpelier, Vermont, May 11, 1825, and his early life was spent on the old homestead. In 1846, having attained his majority, he came to Wisconsin and engaged in the lumbering business with Joseph Desert at Mosinee, the firm being Desert & Cate. In 1856 he was married to Miss Frances Brown, who with their three sons, Clinton, George and Walter, all of whom are at home, survive him. Two of their children, a son and a daughter, are dead. In 1860 he disposed of his lumber business and settled upon the farm in Stockton where he had ever since resided. His farm comprised about five hundred acres and he has always been regarded as one of the best farmers in the county, a reputation that was at all times fully sustained by the success he achieved in his chosen occupation. He was a born farmer, and there was no occupation in this world he liked better.

As a neighbor, citizen and friend Henry Cate was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him. Of good judgment, genial, sociable and intuitively opposed to trickery, deceit and subterfuge of every kind, he was a man whom it was always a pleasure to meet. The esteem in which he was held by the people of the town in which he resided, and the confidence they reposed in him, was shown by his almost continuous service, for a long series of years, as chairman of their town and their representative on the County Board. By the latter body he was for a number of years honored with the position of chairman, a position he always filled not only to the satisfaction of the members but of the people of the whole county. For many years he had also been President of the Stockton Insurance Company. In politics Mr. Cate was a Democrat, and in 1878 was the nominee of his party for Member of Assembly, but was defeated by the late T. H. McDill. For the turmoil of party politics, however, he had little taste, but when he did take an active interest he was always found working for the success of worthy candidates.

Three brothers survive him, Geo. W. of this city, Alvin of Plainfield, Vermont and Putnam of California.

The funeral was held at the residence in Stockton at 2:30 o'clock last Thursday afternoon, the services at the house being conducted by Rev. W. S. Williams of the Universalist church of Wausau, and at the grave by Shaurette Lodge No. 93, Independent Order of Odd Fellows of this city, of which organization Mr. Cate had for many years been a member. C. L. Rogers acted as Noble Grand, Walter Frazer, Chaplain, and F. A. Degan, Marshal. The pall bearers were T. J. Murray, Louis Sawyer, J. R. McDonald, F. Skinner, Martin Crocker, E. R. Zimmer, J. C. Campbell and J. F. Korth. The Odd Fellows went out on a special train. The interment took place on the farm, on the opposite side of the road from the residence, where the two children are buried. The attendance at the funeral was very large.


Ann Nevins Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, May 9, 1900. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

THE FINAL SUMMONS

Mrs. Ann Cauley died at the home of her son, M. J. Cauley, corner of Briggs and Smith streets, in this city, at 12:30 o'clock last Wednesday night. The deceased lady had been an invalid from the effects of paralysis, for about five years, having received two strokes, but was able to walk around, with assistance. Wednesday evening she retired at the usual hour, there being no apparent change in her condition until between 10 and 11 o'clock, when her labored breathing aroused her daughter-in-law, and a physician and absent members of the family were summoned. Nothing could be done for her however, and she passed quietly away at the hour above stated, death no doubt being caused by the third stroke.

The deceased lady, whose maiden name was Ann Nevins, was a native of County Mayo, Ireland, where she was born July 20, 1832, and was therefore in the 68th year of her age. She came to this country when a young woman, and direct to Stevens Point after a short residence in the east. Forty-five years ago last September she was married to Michael Cauley, at Portage, and this county had been her home ever since, most of the time being a resident of the town of Linwood, on the west bank of the Wisconsin river, about five miles below the city.

Mr. Cauley died in January, 1892, and they are survived by nine children, Wm., of Custer, Thos. and M. J., of this city, Mrs. Peter Cotty of Grand Fork, S. D., Mrs. Jas. McCamley and Miss Kate Cauley, of Merrill, Mrs. Clarence Van Order, of Cloquet, Minn., and Mrs. Henry Tohms and Miss Alice Cauley, of Nekoosa. She also leaves one sister, Mrs. Bridget Padden, of Lanark. The deceased lady was a noble-hearted woman, one who was much respected by all who knew her, being of a kind, generous disposition, and the surviving children have the sympathy of the community in their affliction.

The funeral took place from St. Stephen's church at 9 o'clock last Saturday morning, Rev. W. J. Rice officiating, with interment in the parish cemetery. The children were all present, as were also Mrs. Padden and son, Thos., of Lanark, Miss Kate and John Cauley, of Wausau, the latter being niece and nephew of the deceased, Gus. Johnson, and many old friends and acquaintances from different parts of the county, the procession being a very long one. The pallbearers were P. Collins, Jas. Glennon, Pat. Sullivan, W. J. Delaney, Pat. Splawn and P. J. Leonard.


Bernice A. Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, September 13, 1962. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Bernice A. Cauley

Miss Bernice A. Cauley, 73, of 307 Pine St., died suddenly Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the Clark County Hospital near Owen, where she had been a patient for the past five weeks. Miss Cauley had been in ill health for two years.

Funeral services will be held Saturday at 9 a.m. at the Episcopal Church of the Intercession. Burial will be made in the family lot in Forest Cemetery.

Friends may call at the Crosby Funeral Home after 3 p.m. Friday.

Miss Cauley was a teacher in the local public school system for many years. She was born in Stevens Point, on March 23, 1890, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Cauley. She was graduated from the home economics course at the Stevens Point Normal School, now Central State College. She taught at Menomonie and Fond du Lac before she came back here to teach in 1926.

She retired from the local faculty in 1958.

She was a member of the Episcopal Church, the Stevens Point Women's Club, the Stevens Point and the Central Wisconsin Teachers Associations, and the Wisconsin and the National Education Associations.

The last surviving member of her family, she was preceded in death by her parents and two sisters, Marie and Grace. She is survived by cousins in the local area and in the west.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, September 17, 1962:

Miss Cauley's Funeral

The Rev. Edward C. Lewis officiated at the funeral last Saturday morning in the Episcopal Church of the Intercession for Miss Bernice A. Cauley of 307 Pine St.

Miss Cauley died unexpectedly last Wednesday in Clark County Hospital near Owen, Wis. Burial was made in the family lot in Forest Cemetery.

The pallbearers were Leo Larsen, Ralph A. Cook, C. E. Yach and Donald, Jack and Nevin Cauley.

Attending the funeral from away were Clifford McCamley, Miss Mildred McCamley and Mrs. Alice Hoye, Merrill; Misses Ruth and Evelyn Cawley, Wausau; Mr. and Mrs. Donald Cauley and family, Manitowoc, and Miss Donna Lea Cauley, Milwaukee.

Others attended the funeral from Stevens Point and this vicinity.


Bertha (Birdie) Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, December 27, 1983. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Miss Bertha (Birdie) Cauley

Miss Bertha (Birdie) Cauley, 91, died Sunday at Portage County Home.

Services will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday at St. Stephen's Catholic Church. The Rev. Thomas Mullen will officiate. Burial will be in the parish cemetery.

Friends may call after 4 p.m. today at Boston Funeral Home. A general rosary will be said at 7:30 p.m.

Miss Cauley was born Oct. 21, 1892, in Custer, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Cauley, and grew up there. She attended Stevens Point Normal School.

she moved to Stevens Point in 1958 with a sister and lived at 1609 Briggs St. She moved to Hi-Rise Manor, 1300 Briggs St., in 1973. She had been a resident of Portage County Home for two years. She was a member of St. Stephen's Catholic Church and a charter member of the Catholic Women's Club.

Survivors include nephews and cousins.

One brother and three sisters preceded her in death.

Catherine Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, March 16, 1954. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

MISS CATHERINE CAULEY

Miss Catherine Cauley, 88, a native of Stevens Point, died Monday evening at 6:30 o'clock at the home of her late sister, Mrs. James McCamley, in Merrill.

The body was brought here today and is at the Crosby funeral home where friends may call after 7 o'clock this evening. Funeral services will be held Thursday morning at 9:30 o'clock at St. Stephen's Catholic church with burial in the spring in the parish cemetery. A general rosary will be recited Wednesday evening at 7:30 o'clock at the funeral home.

Miss Cauley, daughter of the late Michael and Anna Cauley, was born in Stevens Point in 1866. She spent her young girlhood here and then went to Merrill to make her home with her sister.

Of her three brothers and five sisters, only one sister survives. She is Mrs. Alice Johnson of Des Plaines, Ill. There are a number of nieces and nephews.

Her late brothers are William Cauley, Custer, Thomas E. Cauley, Stevens Point, and Michael Cauley, Wausau. The sisters who preceded her in death are Mrs. Henry Thoms, Dallas, Tex., Mrs. Jennie Van Order, Phoenix, Ariz., Mrs. Mary Cota, Bemidji, Minn., and Mrs. McCamley.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, March 19, 1954:

Funeral of Miss Cauley

Rev. John R. McGinley officiated at funeral services Thursday at 9:30 a.m. at St. Stephen's Catholic church for Miss Catherine Cauley, Merrill. Burial will be made later in the parish cemetery.

Miss Cauley, who was born in Stevens Point and spent her girlhood here, died in Merrill Monday evening.

Pallbearers were J. J. Hart, Louis M. Maloney, Joseph G. Woitkovich, Alex N. Berens, Ben Welch and R. A. Cook.

Attending the services from a distance were Mrs. Alice Johnson, Des Plaines, Ill.; Frank Johnson, Madison; Miss Mildred McCamley and Mrs. S. E. Hoge, Merrill, and Mrs. Rose Cauley and daughters and Mr. and Mrs. Clifford McCamley, Wausau.


Donald James Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, December 28, 1989. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Donald Cauley

Donald J. Cauley, 74, Manitowoc, died Saturday at the North Ridge Care Center, Manitowoc.

Services were held at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the St. Paul Catholic Church, Manitowoc, with burial in Knollwood Memorial Gardens, Manitowoc County.

Mr. Cauley was born Aug. 24, 1915, in Custer, a son of the late William J. and Emma (Flateau) Cauley.

He was married to the former Lelah Wimme on Dec. 27, 1941, in Custer. She survives.

They moved to Manitowoc in 1946 and had resided there since.

He was a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and the Milwaukee School of Engineering. He worked at Manitowoc Equipment Works as a refrigeration technician from 1948-1973. He was also self-employed in the refrigeration and air conditioner service.


Emma Flateau Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, December 18, 1980. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Emma Cauley

Mrs. Emma Cauley, 90, Custer, died Wednesday morning at St. Michael's Hospital, where she had been a patient since Dec. 4.

Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at St. Mary's Catholic Church, Custer. The Rev. Robert Altmann, La Crosse, will officiate. Burial will be in the parish cemetery.

Friends may call after 4 p.m. Friday at the Boston Funeral Home. Gold Star Mothers, of which she was a member, will hold a ritual at 7 p.m. and the general rosary will be said at 7:30 p.m.

Mrs. Cauley was born Jan. 8, 1890, in Dancy, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Flateau. She grew up there and attended the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point. She taught in grade schools in Dancy and the town of Stockton.

She married William J. Knowlton in 1913. The couple settled in Custer and he worked as a livestock dealer. He died in 1965. She lived in Portage County Home for a short time before entering the hospital.

She was a member of St. Mary's Altar Society.

Survivors include two sons, Jack, Custer, and Donald, Manitowoc, two sisters-in-law, eight grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

Two sons, two daughters, two brothers and four sisters preceded her in death.


Grace Elizabeth Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, March 11, 1942. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

OBITUARY

Miss Grace Elizabeth Cauley

Miss Grace Elizabeth Cauley, 307 Pine street, a member of a well known Stevens Point family and prominent in the city's musical circles for many years, died this morning at 5:30 o'clock at St. Michael's hospital.

Miss Cauley became ill on January 10, 1941, and she was a patient at the hospital intermittently for several months during the past year. Her first serious illness began with bronchial pneumonia and her condition was regarded as critical for some time. Since November her health improved and prior to March 3, when she again became ill, it was believed she had recovered. Her condition was not regarded as serious until Tuesday morning when she was removed to the hospital, lapsing into a coma Tuesday evening. Her death was attributed to a heart attack.

A lifelong resident of Stevens Point, Miss Cauley was born here, a daughter of the late Thomas Cauley, Portage county highway commissioner for 23 years, and Mrs. Jessie Cauley. Mr. Cauley died in 1936.

Miss Cauley attended the Stevens Point High school and studied music with local instructors. Furthering her education in music, she studied pipe organ, piano and violin at Wausau, pipe organ at Wisconsin Rapids and later attended the McPhail School of Music at Minneapolis. For many years she had classes in piano and violin at her studio at the Pine street home. She also served as organist at the Presbyterian and Methodist churches for a time.

Surviving are her mother and a sister, Miss Bernice Cauley, a teacher at the Lincoln school. A sister, Marie, died in 1911.

Miss Cauley was a member of the Episcopal Church of the Intercession and its St. Agnes' Guild. She was an active member of Twilight Music club for several years.

Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at the Episcopal church, following a short prayer at the Cauley home. Burial will follow in Forest cemetery. The body will be taken to the family home Thursday morning.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, March 16, 1942:

Funeral of Miss Cauley

Funeral services for Miss Grace Elizabeth Cauley, 307 Pine street, who died Wednesday morning, were held Saturday morning at the Episcopal Church of the Intercession, Rev. Edward C. Lewis officiated at the services at 10 o'clock and burial followed in Forest cemetery. A quartet composed of Mr. and Mrs. Herbert R. Steiner, Mrs. John Medlyn and Norman E. Knutzen sang "Jerusalem The Golden," "Abide With Me" and "There is a Blessed Home." They were accompanied by Miss Mavis Preville.

The pallbearers were Dr. G. B. Jensen, Ralph A. Cook, E. A. Wilson, A. A. Menzel, Paul M. Vincent and James W. Hull.

Those from a distance who came for the funeral included Fred Sansom of Milwaukee; Mr. and Mrs. Earl Thompson, Miss Helen Thompson and Eugene Thompson of Neenah; Mr. and Mrs. Forest Mengle of Wisconsin Rapids; Mrs. Alice Hoye of Merrill; Mrs. M. J. Cawley, Mrs. Bertha Cawley and Miss Evelyn Cawley of Wausau; Mr. and Mrs. Clifford McCamley of Schofield, Miss Mable Johnson and Mrs. Cora Martin of Green Bay and Mr. and Mrs. John Tovey of Fremont.


Jessie Thompson Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, July 26, 1945. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Thomas E. Cauley

Mrs. Thomas E. Cauley, 76, died at 7:30 o'clock this morning at her home, 307 Pine street, following a long illness. Mrs. Cauley had been in ill health for three years and her condition was serious at intervals during this time. She had been in critical condition for the past two weeks.

Mrs. Cauley, whose maiden name was Jessie Electa Thompson, was born Dec. 22, 1868, at Neenah, daughter of the late George and Eliza Thompson, pioneer residents who came to Neenah from New York state by covered wagon. She resided at Neenah during her girlhood and was graduated from Neenah High school at the age of 16. She remained at Neenah until her marriage to Mr. Cauley, who took place Feb. 22, 1888, at Chippewa Falls. They had met during the time that her father was engaged in logging operations at Sherry.

Mrs. Cauley had been a continuous resident of Stevens Point since her marriage. Her husband, Portage county highway commissioner for 23 years, died. Jan. 4, 1936.

Mrs. Cauley was a member of the Episcopal Church of the Intercession and its Women's guild. She also was a member of a card club composed of a number of women friends of long standing.

She is survived by one daughter, Miss Bernice Cauley, at home, and two sisters, Mrs. Sansom and Miss Pearl Thompson, both of Wauwatosa. In addition to her husband, two daughters preceded her in death, Miss Grace Cauley on March 11, 1942, and Marie in 1911.

The body is at the family home, where friends may call after 7 o'clock this evening. Funeral services will be held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Episcopal church and burial will follow in Forest cemetery.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, July 30, 1945:

Funeral of Mrs. Cauley

Funeral services for Mrs. Thomas E. Cauley, who died last Thursday morning at her home, 307 Pine street, were held Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the Episcopal Church of the Intercession, Rev. Edward C. Lewis officiated. Miss Dorothy Vetter sang "O Love That Will Not Let Me Go" and "When Day's Shadows Lengthen," accompanied by Mrs. Robert T. Wray.

Burial took place in Forest cemetery. The pallbearers were Judge Byron J. Carpenter, Joseph G. Woitkovich, E. L. DeBot, Dr. A. R. Cook, Alfred A. Menzel and James W. Hull.

Here from away for the funeral were: Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sansom of Wauwatosa, Miss Helen Thompson and Earl Thompson of Neenah, Miss Mabel Johnson and Mrs. Cora Martin of Green Bay, Horace Kellogg of Chicago, Mrs. Dan McKee of Detroit, Mich., Mrs. Ray Murette, Mrs. Bertha Cauley and daughters, Evelyn and Regina, Mrs. Mary Cauley and daughter, Evelyn, and Mr. and Mrs. Clifford McCamley of Wausau, Mrs. Alice Joye and Miss Mildred McCamley of Merrill, Mr. and Mrs. John Tovey of Fremont, Mr. and Mrs. Forest Mengel and Mrs. Peter McCamley of Wisconsin Rapids and Miss Rose Marie Cauley of Milwaukee. Other relatives from Custer and Amherst were present.


Michael Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, January 27, 1892. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

An Old Resident Dead

At half-past four o'clock last Thursday morning, Michael Cauley, one of the early residents of this county, died at his home in the town of Linwood, three and one-half miles south of the city. He had been in poor health during the past year or more , and for a couple of months before his death was confined to his bed most of the time, his demise being caused by general debility. He was born in County Mayo, Ireland, on the 20th of January 1812, and was therefore 80 years of age on the day previous to his death. He crossed the ocean in 1843, remaining in Canada a couple of years, and thereafter removed to New York, where he lived for six years. The succeeding few years were spent in Illinois, and in April, 1855, he came to Stevens Point. On the 11th of September, 1855, he was married to Miss Ann Nevens, at Portage, by the Rev. Father Roach, and after a short residence here they took up their abode at McDill, to remain for several years. For more than a quarter of a century the family have resided in Linwood, where the deceased owned a good farm. He was much respected by the hundreds who knew him in this city and county, being a worthy citizen and a good husband and father. Ten children were born to himself and wife, nine of whom survive. They are William, of Stockton, Thos., of this city, Mary, Nellie, Alice and Michael, who reside at home, and Mrs. Jas. McCamley, Kate and Jennie, of Merrill, the latter being a teacher in the public schools there, and all were with their father during his last moments. The funeral took place from St. Stephen's church at half-past nine o'clock last Saturday morning, Rev. M. J. O'Brien officiating. The pall bearers were Jas. Glennon, Patrick Collins, Timothy Sullivan, Patrick Leonard, Patrick Splawn and Louis Shepreaux.


Nevin Raymond Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, April 4, 1969. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Obituary

Nevin R. Cauley

Nevin R. Cauley, 2108 Welsby Ave., died at 8 a.m. today at St. Michael's Hospital, where he was admitted as a patient earlier in the day. He had been in ill health for the past several years.

Funeral services will be held Monday at 10 a.m. at St. Mary's Catholic church at Custer. Burial will be made in the parish cemetery.

Friends may call at the Crosby Funeral Home after 3 p.m. on Sunday. A general rosary will be recited there Sunday evening at 8 o'clock, with members of the St. Cecilia's Court No. 185, National Catholic Order of Foresters, participating. Mr. Cauley's four daughters are members of the Junior Foresters of Court No. 185.

Mr. Cauley was born in Portage County on Dec. 16, 1921, a son of Mrs. William J. Cauley, now of Custer, and the late Mr. Cauley. He attended elementary school at Custer and P. J. Jacobs High School.

He entered service in the Navy on Aug. 20, 1945, and served at Great Lakes Naval Training Station at Great Lakes, Ill., and in the Naval Aviation Training Command at Memphis, Tenn., before he was discharged in July 1946.

On June 12, 1954, at Custer, he married Audrey Tull, of Wisconsin Rapids. Mr. Cauley was in the livestock business with his father and his brother Jack until ill health forced him out of the activity several years ago.

He is survived by his wife; four daughters, Mary, Rosanne, Kathleen and Jacqueline, all at home; his mother, at Custer, and two brothers, Jack, at Custer, and Donald J. Cauley, Manitowoc.

He was preceded in death by his father, two sisters and a brother.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, April 8, 1969:

Cauley Funeral

Funeral services were held Monday morning at Custer for Nevin R. Cauley, 2108 Welsby Ave., who died Friday.

The Rev. Leo J. Lan officiated at the services at St. Mary's Catholic Church. He also conducted burial rites in the parish cemetery.

Color bearers were R. B. Lewis and Irv Lutz and the flag was presented by Phillip LeClair, Portage County veterans service officer.

Pallbearers were Leonard Berry, Albert Bronk, Robert Brunner, James O'Keefe, Frank Somers and Gerry Stenz.

Friends and relatives attending came from Seal Beach, Calif.; St. Paul and St. Cloud, Minn. and from Milwaukee, Manitowoc, Waterford, Wisconsin Rapids, Waupaca, Mosinee, Blenker and the Stevens Point and Custer vicinities.


Rose Anne Corrigan Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, February 27, 1957. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

OBITUARY

Mrs. Rose Cauley

One of Portage County's oldest residents and a member of a pioneer Town of Stockton family, Mrs. Rose Cauley, died at 5:35 this morning at the age of 96.

Her death occurred at St. Michael's Hospital, where she had been a patient since becoming ill last Thursday. Until then, Mrs. Cauley had enjoyed unusually good health. She underwent major surgery a year and a half ago at the age of 95, but made an excellent recovery.

Mrs. Cauley, who lived near Custer, was a lifelong resident of the Town of Stockton.

She was born April 7, 1860, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Corrigan, Irish immigrants who were among the first settlers in Stockton.

Her marriage to William Cauley Sr. took place May 15, 1883, at St. Stephen's Catholic Church in Stevens Point, and the couple made their home on a farm in Stockton.

Mr. Cauley died in November 1923. Since then Mrs. Cauley had lived with a daughter, Miss Birdie Cauley.

She was a member of the Altar Society of St. Mary's Catholic Church at Custer.

Surviving are a son, William, Jr., Custer; three daughters, Mrs. Hazel Tovey, 718 Main St., Mrs. Nick Britz, 1810 Main St. and Miss Birdie Cauley; a sister, Miss Frankie Corrigan, Spokane, Wash., four grandchildren and three great grandchildren.

In addition to her husband, she was preceded in death by a daughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Leary, who died last Oct. 3; a grandson, Tom Cauley, killed in world War II; two brothers, James and Patrick Corrigan, and five sisters, Mrs. Maria Gleason, Mrs. Maggie Shea, Mrs. Catherine Dineen, Mrs. Getta Padden and Mrs. Nellie Miller.

The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Mary's Church, Custer, and burial will take place in the spring in St. Stephen's Cemetery here.

Friends may call after 3 p.m. Thursday at the Crosby Funeral Home.

St. Cecilia's Court No. 185, Women's Catholic Order of Foresters, will say the rosary at the funeral home at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. A daughter, Mrs. Britz, is a member. At 8 p.m. Thursday, the Altar Society of St. Mary's will recite the rosary.

A general rosary will be said at 7:30 p.m. Friday, and the Knights of Columbus will recite the rosary Friday at 8. The son, William is a member of the KCs.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, March 4, 1957:

Mrs. Cauley's Funeral

Funeral services were held at St. Mary's Catholic Church at Custer Saturday morning for Mrs. Rose Cauley, 96, Town of Stockton.

Mrs. Cauley, one of the county's oldest residents, died Wednesday.

The Rev. Emil Hodnik conducted the services and burial will take place in the spring in St. Stephen's Cemetery, Stevens Point.

Pallbearers were Jack Cauley, Donald Cauley, James O'Keefe, Pat O'Keefe, Pat Corrigan and Dan Corrigan.

"O What Could My Jesus Do More" and "When Day's Shadows Lengthen" were sung during the services by R. J. Weiss, accompanied by Miss Barbara Van Hecke.

Members of the parish Altar Society attended the funeral in a group.

Attending from a distance were Mr. and Mrs. Donald Cauley and family, Manitowoc; Miss Rose Marie Cauley, Milwaukee; Mr. and Mrs. Emmet Corrigan, Mrs. Bert Corrigan, Mrs. Myron Corrigan and daughter Gertrude, Ray Corrigan, Mr. and Mrs. Dan Corrigan and Mrs. Mike Goggins, Foley, Minn.

Mrs. Mayme Corrigan, Cambridge, Minn.; Pat Corrigan and Mr. and Mrs. Allan Sandbo, St. Cloud, Minn.; Mr. and Mrs. Larry Shelven, Des Plaines, Ill.; Francis Johnson, Middleton; Mr. and Mrs. Clifford McCamley and Ruth and Evelyn Cauley, Wausau; Mrs. Ethel Miller and Miss Mildred McCamley, Merrill.

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dineen, Maurice O'Keefe and Mrs. and Mrs. Robert Gearing, Milwaukee; Mr. and Mrs. Claude Dineen, Miss Mildred Berg and Christ Peterson, Iola; Mr. and Mrs. Luman Precourt and sons, Appleton; Mr. and Mrs. John Altman and Miss Betty Ann Altman, Blenker; Mr. and Mrs. Orville Peterson, Green Bay.

Mrs. Pat Averill, Mrs. Arlen Pitt, Mrs. Henry Lewon and Mrs. Arden Sebsted, Fremont; Mr. and Mrs. Jonas Britz, Mr. and Mrs. Howard McCamley, Miss Lizzie McCamley, Mrs. Ellen McCamley and Mr. and Mrs. Glen Daly, Wisconsin Rapids, and others from Amherst and Amherst Junction.


Rose Marie Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, July 31, 1967. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Obituary

Rose Marie Cauley

A former area resident, Rose Marie Cauley, 48, Milwaukee, died at 6 p.m. Sunday at St. Mary's Hospital Burn Center, Milwaukee.

Confined to a wheel chair because of multiple sclerosis, Miss Cauley died of burns suffered about an hour earlier when a cigarette she was smoking apparently set her clothing on fire. She suffered second and third degree burns to her face, neck, chest and back.

Miss Cauley was the daughter of Mrs. Emma Cauley, Custer, and the late William J. Cauley. She was born in Custer May 15, 1919.

Finishing grade school in Custer, she attended Stevens Point High School and Wisconsin State University. After teaching in Portage County, she served in the Women's Army Corps in 1945.

She attended St. Theresa's College, Winona, Minn., graduating in 1948. After one year of teaching in Minneapolis, Minn., she was forced to retire due to failing health.

For the past 17 years, a former Stevens Point resident, Miss Mae Hoffman, made her home with Miss Cauley in Milwaukee.

A life member of the Disabled American Veterans, Miss Cauley was active in veteran's affairs. A past commander of the Milwaukee Women's Post No. 448, American Legion. Miss Cauley held the position of service officer for 10 years.

Besides her mother, she is survived by three brothers, a twin, Jack, Custer, Donald, Manitowoc, and Nevin, Mosinee.

Preceding her in death were her father, a brother, Tom, who died in the service, and an infant sister, Mary.

Friends may call after 4 p.m. Tuesday at the Krause Funeral Home, 9020 W. Capitol Drive, Milwaukee, where a general rosary will be said at 8 p.m.

In Stevens Point, friends may visit after 4 p.m. Wednesday at the Crosby Funeral Home. The Altar Society of St. Mary's Catholic Church, Custer, of which Miss Cauley was a member, will combine with a general rosary at 8 p.m.

Funeral services are set for 10 a.m. Wednesday at St. Mary's Catholic Church, Custer, with burial in the parish cemetery.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, August 1, 1967:

Cauley Rites Thursday

Funeral services for Rose Marie Cauley, 48, will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday at St. Mary's Catholic Church, Custer and not on Wednesday, as was previously reported in the Daily Journal.

Burial will follow in the parish cemetery.

The former area resident died Sunday after an accident at her home in Milwaukee.

Friends may call after 4 p.m. Wednesday at the Crosby Funeral Home. The Altar Society of St. Mary's, of which Miss Cauley was a member, will join in with a general rosary at 8 p.m.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, August 4, 1967:

Cauley Rites Held

A requiem mass for Miss Rose Marie Cauley, 48, was celebrated by her cousin, the Rev. Robert Altman, Wausau, Thursday at St. Mary's Catholic Church, Custer.

Miss Cauley, former area resident active in veteran's affairs, died Sunday in Milwaukee

Present in the sanctuary during the services were the Rev. Emil Hodnik, Abbotsford, and the Rev. Bernard J. Nowak, Custer.

Color guards were R. B. Lewis and Don Merdan. Miss Caroline Ryskoski served as bugler.

The firing squad was composed of Thomas Helminski, Victor Jakusz, George Quimby, Victor Jablonski, Gerald Mrozinski and Stanley Polebitski.

The Altar Society of St. Mary's attended in a group as six members of the Woman's Post No. 448, American Legion, Milwaukee. Miss Cauley was a member of both groups.

Serving as pallbearers were Leonard Berry, Carl Bronk, Richard Altman, Mike Yjer, James O'Keefe and Frank Somers.

Relatives and friends attending the funeral came from St. Paul, Minn., Milwaukee, Manitowoc, Green Bay, Iola, Iron Belt, Fond du Lac, Montreal, Appleton, Mosinee, Madison, Merrill, Marion, Abbotsford, Two Rivers, Wausau, Blenker, Marshfield, Phillips and the Stevens Point area.


Thomas E. Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, January 6, 1936. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DEATH CLAIMS TOM E. CAULEY AT HIS HOME

Services Tuesday for Man who Served as Highway Chief for 23 Years

An illness of three years resulted in the death at 9:20 o'clock Saturday night of Thomas E. Cauley, 77, Portage county highway commissioner for 23 years prior to January 1, 1935, and formerly city engineer and street commissioner of Stevens Point for 16 years.

Mr. Cauley passed away at his home at 307 Pine street, where he had been confined most of the time since August 20. He had been ill in bed since Thanksgiving and his condition was critical since a few days after Thanksgiving. His death was caused by heart trouble.

Pioneer in Road Work

One of Portage county's most widely known residents, Mr. Cauley was a member of a pioneer local family and spent his entire life in Stevens Point and vicinity. He was among the pioneers in Wisconsin road building who served when highway improvement was still in its early stages and who remained at the helm throughout the transitionary period which marked the coming of hard-surfaces roads. Devoted to his duties, Mr. Cauley continued to serve as county highway commissioner even after becoming ill, and his long period of service established a record in Wisconsin. The record was shared by Andrew Eckland of Marinette. They had the distinction of being the oldest highway commissioners in the state in length of service.

Mr. Cauley, known to his friends as "Tom," was born in Stevens Point on November 30, 1858. He was a son of Michael and Ann (Nevens) Cauley. His father and mother were both natives of County Mayo, Ireland. They came to America about the same time, in 1849, but before their marriage. They were married at Portage and from there drove as their honeymoon trip, by ox team, to Stevens Point. Michael Cauley bought a tract of government land in the town of Plover, lived there for a number of years, then returned to Stevens Point, and finally settled in Linwood, at Conant rapids.

Born in Log House

Tom Cauley's birthplace was a log house on Main street near the site of the old Curran House, an early day hotel, in the block now occupied by the Copps company. During his boyhood he received his education at the Old White school and in later years he was an active member of the Old White School association. In his younger manhood he worked as a lumberman for 15 years and subsequently devoted his attention almost entirely to public road work. From 1895 to 1911 he was in the employ of Stevens Point as city engineer and street commissioner, having charge of all of the street work of that period, including the laying of sewers and the construction of macadam streets which were a marked improvement over the earlier roadways of cedar blocks, ashes and dirt.

First to Hold Office

The office of county highway commissioner was created in the fall of 1911 and Mr. Cauley became the first commissioner and served continuously for 23 years with the exception of a part of 1914 when he was in the employ of the state highway commission. For the first three years the office was an appointive one, in control of the state highway commission. In the fall of 1914, ten counties in the state began to elect their highway commissioners. Portage county was among them and elected Mr. Cauley, who continued to re-elected and to serve until a year ago.

In 1916 Mr. Cauley served as the second president of the Wisconsin County Highway Commissioners' association. An article about him, published in 1917 in the magazine, "Good Roads for Wisconsin." said in part: "Everybody in Portage and the surrounding counties knows Tom Cauley. He is an efficient highway commissioner and knows his business thoroughly. When off duty he is president of the Portage County Sunshine club and always walks on the sunny side of the street."

The "Sunshine club" was only a myth, but the reference was a tribute to Mr. Cauley's congenial nature on the part of his colleagues in the state.

Sees Vast Road Changes

As highway commissioner Mr. Cauley, in his earlier years of service, had the difficult task on his hands of repairing and maintaining the sand, clay and dirt roads of Portage county, and later the gravel roads. Increasing travel and demands by the public caused the work to expand from year to year and the amounts of money expended upon roads to increase as the automobile came into more general use. The old Yellowstone trail was

(continued on page 8)

Page 8:

DEATH CLAIMS TOM E. CAULEY AT HIS HOME

(Continued from page one)

one of the early highways crossing Portage county. Road improvement work was also being extended throughout the townships, to make travel safer and quicker. As the federal and state trunk highway system developed, Portage county paved its main arteries of travel and Stevens Point became the main junction point for highways in central Wisconsin, with U. S. Highways 10 and 51 crossing here.

Friendships of life-long standing were maintained by Mr. Cauley until the last through a circle of old friends who met to play cards and visit at the Arlington House. In his earlier years Mr. Cauley took an active part in civic affairs in Stevens Point and in local politics. He was a Democrat and was a party leader in years past. He served actively as a member of a former civic club. He also had a reputation as a sportsman and took great pleasure in fishing.

Mr. Cauley was married to Miss Jessie Thompson, a native of Neenah and daughter of George Thompson, Neenah pioneer on February 22, 1888, at Chippewa Falls. Mrs. Cauley survives as do two of the three children who were born to them, Miss Bernice Cauley, a teacher in the Washington school, and Miss Grace Cauley, a teacher of music. A daughter, Marie, died in 1911 at the age of 16. He is also survived by three sisters, Mrs. Alice Johnson of Vicksburg, Michigan, Mrs. Nell Tohms of Chicago and Mrs. Jane Van Order of Globe, Arizona. A brother, William, of Custer, died in 1923 and another brother, Michael, of Wausau passed away six years ago.

Services Tuesday

Funeral services will be held at 2 o'clock Tuesday afternoon at the Church of the Intercession, of which Mr. Cauley was a member. Rev. Harley G. Smith will officiate and burial will take place in Forest Cemetery. A prayer will be said at the Cauley home preceding the church service. The body is at the family home.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, January 6, 1936, page 8:

Close Highway Department for Cauley Funeral

The Portage county highway department will be closed from 12 noon to 4 p.m. Tuesday in respect to the memory of the late Thomas E. Cauley, former county highway commissioner for 23 years, who

died at his home Saturday night. Mr. Cauley's funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon. The highway department will operate only if it should become necessary to do so because of a snow storm, to keep the roads open.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, January 8, 1936:

Funeral of Mr. Cauley

Relatives, friends, former business associates and county officers filled the Church of the Intercession Tuesday afternoon to attend funeral service for Thomas E. Cauley, 77, former Portage county highway commissioner and one of the county's most widely known citizens, who died Saturday night at his home at 307 Pine street.

Rev. Harley G. Smith conducted the services at the church at 2 o'clock and a short prayer at the Cauley home preceding the church services. Burial followed in Forest cemetery.

During the services a quartet composed of Mr. and Mrs. H. R. Steiner, Mrs. A. A. Hetzel and Norman E. Knutzen, accompanied by Miss Ruth Hamilton, sang "Jesus Savior Pilot Me" and "Abide With Me."

County offices at the court house were closed during the services and the county officers attended the funeral in a body. Seven friends of Mr. Cauley, of long standing, also attended the services in a group. They are James Welch, A. J. Cunneen, E. J. Pfiffner, Alex Ringness, William Cartmill, A. Love and Charles Hamilton.

The pallbearers were Dan Galvin, Elmer J. Carley, Charles Martin, George Sherbert, Guy E. Morrill and Frank A. Neuberger. Mrs. A. A. Menzel, Mrs. R. M. Rightsell and Mrs. James W. Hull were in charge of the numerous floral offerings.

Former business associates from out of town who attended the funeral included Thomas J. Pattison, secretary of the Wisconsin highway commission, and Karl Kurtenacker, state highway employe, both of Madison; J. McDonald, Clintonville; J. Davis of Milwaukee; Jesse Clark of Wausau; James Lewis of Wisconsin Rapids and John McGregor of Friendship, the latter three highway commissioners, and William J. Haselton, W. C. Krueger, Charles Holmes and C. W. Wittenberg of the Wisconsin Rapids division of the state highway department.

Besides the many friends from Portage and adjoining counties who were present for the funeral relatives from away included Mrs. Michael Cauley, Mr. and Mrs. M. Cauley; Evelyn Cauley and Dorothy Cauley of Wausau; Mrs. Alice Hoye of Merrill; Mrs. Rose Cauley and daughter, Birdie; Mr. and Mrs. William Cauley and family and Mr. and Mrs. Walter Leary of Custer; Mr. and Mrs. John Tovey of Fremont; Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Russell of Bancroft; Mrs. Pat Higgins of Amherst; Mrs. James Delaney of Amherst; Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sansom and Miss Pearl Thompson of Wauwatosa; Eugene Thompson of Milwaukee and Mr. and Mrs. Forest Mengel and Mrs. Peter McCamley of Wisconsin Rapids.


Thomas William Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, September 20, 1943. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

THOMAS CAULEY LOSES LIFE IN CAR ACCIDENT

Custer Soldier is Victim of Crash Near Savanna, Ill.

Sergeant Thomas W. Cauley, age 27, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Cauley of Custer, was fatally injured Saturday evening when the car in which he was riding crashed through a guard rail on a bridge near Savanna, Ill. He died in the Savanna City hospital.

The driver of the car, a corporal, was also killed in the accident. The soldiers, members of the Savanna ordnance depot military police detachment proving grounds; were on their way to Savanna for guard duty when the accident occurred. Sergeant Cauley's parents received word of his death Saturday night at 11 o'clock and left immediately for Savanna. They were accompanied by Mrs. Nick Britz, 311 McCulloch street, an aunt of the soldier.

One of Four Sons

Sergeant Cauley was one of four sons of Mr. and Mrs. William Cauley in the service and war work. Corporal Donald J. Cauley is in Alaska, Private First Class Jack C. Cauley is in Australia and Nevin R. Cauley is employed on the Alcan highway and is located at Muskwa, B. C.

Sergeant Cauley was born at Custer on September 16, 1916. He attended the Custer grade school and the Stevens Point High school, from which he was graduated in 1934. Prior to entering the service in June, 1942, he was employed by the Allis Chalmers company of Milwaukee. His marriage to Miss Virginia Johnson of Milwaukee took place on April 18, 1942. His wife was with him at Savanna, where he had been located since entering the service. Mrs. Cauley's mother, Mrs. Johnson, and a friend of the latter, a Mrs. Fink, left from Milwaukee for Savanna, upon receiving word of the young man's death.

Surviving besides his parents and three brothers are a sister, Miss Rose Marie Cauley of Custer and his grandmother, Mrs. Rose Cauley, also of Custer.

Accompanied by a military escort, the body was brought to the family home at Custer today. Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 9:30 o'clock at St. Mary's Catholic church at Custer. The rosary will be said tonight and Tuesday night at 8 o'clock.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, September 23, 1943:

Funeral of Sergeant Cauley

St. Mary's Catholic church at Custer was filled and many remained outside for the funeral Wednesday morning of Sergeant Thomas W. Cauley, son of Mr. and Mrs. William Cauley of Custer, who was fatally injured Saturday night in an automobile accident near Savanna, Illinois, where the young man was stationed with an ordnance depot military police detachment. He died a short time after the accident in a Savanna hospital.

The car in which Sergeant Cauley was a passenger was driven by Corporal John G. Penk, 24, of Milwaukee, who was also killed in the accident. It skidded on a curve on a viaduct and plunged through a wooden railing to railroad tracks 30 feet below. Sergeant Cauley was on his way to Savanna for guard duty.

The body was brought to the Cauley home on Monday and the services were held yesterday at 9:30 o'clock. Rev. Henry J. Ehr of Stevens Point officiated in the absence of the pastor, Rev. Harry Schueller. Burial took place in the parish cemetery.

In a sermon given by Father Ehr, he told the family that they had much to console and strengthen them in the thought that Sergeant Cauley lost his life in the fulfillment of his duties as a soldier. He said that patriotism is not shown by the waving of flags, shouting and singing of songs, but it is shown by the serving of our country, even at the supreme sacrifice. Father Ehr declared that Sergeant Cauley was not only a good soldier, but that he was a good Christian and had faithfully practiced his religion.

In tribute to the young soldier, six of his fellow soldiers from Savanna came for the funeral and were the pallbearers. They were Sergeants Dave Tesnow, Milton Rogers, Benedict Garmis and Paul Avery and Corporals Jack Paps and Dee Najdowski. They were accompanied by Mrs. Rogers, Mrs. Majdowski, Mrs. Paps and Mrs. Tesnow.

A firing squad, composed of members of the 97th College Training detachment, were present and consisted of R. A. Friese, E. W. Atchison, J. R. Perry, R. E. Riley, S. R. Lukaszak, E. D. Staricha, W. E. Thomas and L. H. Ponder. They were accompanied by William E. Harper, who sounded taps, and Staff Sergeant J. A. Skogland.

Relatives and friends who came from a distance besides those from Savanna, were Mrs. Bessie Johnson and Arthur Johnson of Milwaukee, parents of Mrs. Cauley, Sergeant Earl Johnson of the Hiram college training detachment, Hiram, Ohio, brother of Mrs. Cauley; Emmet Corrigan and daughter, Dorothy, of Foly, Minnesota; Miss Eileen Corrigan of Chicago; Corporal Daniel J. Corrigan of Camp Chaffee, Arkansas; Miss Irene Gleason of Beloit; Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Zelmet, Mrs. August Ross and Mrs. Louis Borowick of St. Paul; Chief Pettery Officer Eugene Zelmet of the University of Minnesota; Mrs. John J. Altman of Blenker; Mrs. August Massloff of Marshfield, and Mr. and Mrs. John T. Tovey of Fremont. Others were present from Amherst, Amherst Junction, Nelsonville, Rosholt, Almond, Buena Vista, Sevens Point, Dancy and Mosinee.


William James Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, March 16, 1965. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

William Cauley

William J. Cauley, 81, Route 1 Custer, a well-known retired livestock dealer at Custer, died at 4 a.m. today at St. Michael's Hospital. He had entered the hospital Monday.

Funeral services have been scheduled for 11 a.m. Friday at St. Mary's Catholic Church, Custer. A spring burial will be made in the parish cemetery.

Friends may call at the Crosby Funeral Home after 3 p.m. Wednesday. The Knights of Columbus, of which Mr. Cauley was a member for 50 years, will pray a rosary at 7 p.m. Wednesday. At 7:30 a rosary will be prayed by St. Cecilia's Court No. 185, Women's Catholic Order of Foresters. A sister, Mrs. Nick Britz, is a member. A general rosary will also be said at 7:30.

Mr. Cauley was born in Portage County Jan. 27, 1884 a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Cauley. He lived in the county all his life and was in the livestock business for 40 years until he retired.

He married the former Emma Flateau at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church at Knowlton on Sept. 27, 1913.

Survivors include his wife; a daughter, Miss Rose Marie Cauley, Milwaukee; three sons, Donald, Manitowoc, Jack at home, and Nevin, Mosinee; and three sisters, Mrs. Hazel Tovey, 807 Briggs St., Mrs. Nick Britz, 1810 Main St., and Miss Birdie Cauley, 807 Briggs.

A son, Thomas, killed in World War II, an infant daughter and one sister preceded him in death.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, March 20, 1965:

Cauley Funeral

The Rev. Robert Altman, Wausau, was the celebrant of a solemn requiem high mass Friday morning at St. Mary's Catholic Church, Custer, for the funeral of William J. Cauley, Custer.

Mr. Cauley, 81, a retired livestock dealer, died Tuesday at St. Michael's Hospital.

Assisting Father Altman, a nephew of Mrs. Cauley, at the 11 o'clock mass were the Rev. Bernard Nowak, pastor, as deacon, and the Rev. Emil Hodnik, Heffron, a former pastor at Custer, as subdeacon. One of the mass servers was James Cauley, a grandson of Mr. Cauley.

Pallbearers were John Bannach, Robert Brunner, Ed Bronk, Frank Somers, Walter Damrau and Joe Formella.

Relatives and friends attended the funeral from Milwaukee, Oshkosh, Green Bay, Milladore, Blenker, Wausau, Mosinee and Manitowoc as well as the local area.


William W. Cauley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, November 23, 1923. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

OBITUARY

William Cauley, Sr.

William Cauley, Sr. who enjoyed as large an acquaintance throughout Portage county as any resident, succumbed to diabetis [sic] last night, passing away at St. Michael's hospital at 9:30 o'clock. Mr. Cauley had been in a comatose condition practically all the time since early this week and his death was not wholly unexpected but is none the less regretted by his legion of friends.

Mr. Cauley had been a sufferer with kidney trouble for five or six years but was able to continue his vocation of livestock buyer until 10 weeks ago. He then became a patient at the local hospital, where he underwent two surgical operations, the latter one early in November. For a time his condition seemed to improve and strong hopes were entertained for his full or partial recovery. A change for the worse set in last Monday and he had since declined quite rapidly.

Decedent was born in Stevens Point 67 years ago the 7th of last August. The family moved to Linwood when he was about 10 years of age and he lived there until his marriage to Miss Rose Corrigan more than 40 years ago. They resided in Stevens Point two or three years and then bought farm property just south of Custer station. A large portion of his time was devoted to buying stock for shipment to the Chicago and other markets and of late years his son, William, Jr., was associated with him.

Surviving members of his family are the widow, son and four daughters, Mrs. Walter Leary, Misses Hazel, Clara and Birdie Cauley, all residents of Custer.

There are also two brothers and six sisters, Thomas E. Cauley of this city, M. J. of Wausau, Mrs. Peter Coty of Minnesota, Mrs. James McCamley and Miss Kate Cauley of Merrill, Mrs. Henry Tohms of Chicago, Mrs. Gus Johnson of Vicksburg, Michigan, and Mrs. Clarence Van Order of Globe, Arizona.

The remains have been taken to his former home where they will remain until 10 o'clock Monday morning, when services will be conducted at St. Mary's church, Rev. Victor Kaudy officiating. burial will follow in St. Stephen's cemetery, this city.


Evelyn C. Cawley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, June 4, 1958. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Miss Evelyn Cawley

Funeral services will be held Thursday at 9:30 a.m. at St. James' Catholic Church, Wausau for Miss Evelyn Cawley, 58, North Chicago, Ill., a former student at Central State College here.

Miss Cawley, a former Wausau resident, died Tuesday in a hospital in Waukegan, Ill.

Born in Wausau on April 21, 1900, she lived there for 55 years. She had been a teacher in Rothschild, Sheboygan and Hammond, Ind.

Surviving are three sisters and a brother. Another Miss Evelyn Cawley, principal of the Irving School at Wausau, is a cousin.

The body is at the Ritter & Deutsch Funeral Home, Wausau.

Harold James Cawley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, October 21, 1937. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

OBITUARY

Harold J. Cawley

Harold J. Cawley, 38, died suddenly this morning at 10 o'clock at his home at 450 1-2 Main street after an illness of only a few hours. He was stricken at 6:30 o'clock this morning with a cerebral hemorrhage and was unconscious until his death.

Mr. Cawley was born on November 12, 1898 in Stevens Point a son of the late Michael Cawley, and Mrs. Cawley. During his childhood the family moved to Wausau where he attended and was graduated from the Wausau High school. He then entered St. Thomas' college at St. Paul from which he graduated in 1920. After completing his education he became employed as manager of a lumber yard and saw mill at Prentice where he was employed until 1923. At that time he purchased his own lumber business at Wausau, known as the Cawley Lumber company, which he operated until 1927 when he sold the business and moved to Oklahoma, where he was interested in oil. He came to Stevens Point in 1930 and had been here since.

His marriage to Miss Helen Martini, a member of a well known Stevens Point family, took place at St. Stephen's church on March 4, 1924.

Surviving are his wife, his mother, Mrs. Mary Cawley of Wausau, three sisters, Mrs. F. W. Larson of St. Louis, Missouri, and Evelyn and Ruth Cawley of Wausau, and a brother, Forrest Cawley of Toledo, Lucas Co., Ohio.

Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Stephen's church and burial will follow in St. Stephen's cemetery. The body is at the Crosby funeral home, where the rosary will be said Friday evening at 8 o'clock.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, October 25, 1937:

Funeral of Mr. Cawley

Funeral services for Harold J. Cawley, who died suddenly Thursday morning at his home at 450 1/2 Main street, were held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Stephen's church. Rev. J. R. McGinley of Marinette, an uncle of Mr. Cawley officiated. Burial took place in St. Stephen's cemetery.

The pall bearers were K. B. Willett, M. J. Willett, Dr. Ferdinand Krembs, Robert Krembs, Edgar Vielie and Thomas Malone, Jr.

Those from out of town who came for the funeral included Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Vielie, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Malone, Jr., Mrs. Michael Cawley and daughters, Ruth and Evelyn, and Miss Irene Whalen of Wausau; Forrest Cawley of Toledo, Lucas Co., Ohio; Mrs. Wayne Larson of St. Louis, Missouri; Lorentz Martini of Chicago; Miss Nellie McGinley of Marinette; Mrs. Alice Hoye and Miss Mildred McCamley of Merrill; Mrs. James Delaney and Miss Katherine McGinley of Amherst; Mrs. John Tovey of Fremont and Mr. and Mrs. William A. Downs of Superior.


Helen Martini Cawley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, August 8, 1988. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Helen M. Cawley

Helen M. Cawley, 89, Portage County Home, died there early this morning following an extended illness.

Services will be held at 10 a.m. Wednesday at St. Stephen Catholic Church. The Rev. Joseph Konopacky will officiate. Burial will be in the parish cemetery.

Friends may call after 5 p.m. Tuesday at Boston Funeral Home. A general rosary will be said at 8 p.m. A memorial has been established in her name for the Central Wisconsin Health Foundation.

Mrs. Cawley was born Sept. 1, 1898, in Stevens Point, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Martini. She was graduated from Emerson High School in 1915 and from St. Joseph Hospital's School of Nursing, Marshfield, in 1918.

She was married to Harold Cawley March 4, 1924, at St. Stephen's Church. He died in 1939. The couple lived in Wausau and moved to Stevens Point in the mid 1930s. After her husband died, Mrs. Cawley attended the University of Minnesota and obtained a degree in public health nursing.

She worked as a public health nurse in Ripon, Menasha and Merrill. She then returned to Stevens Point, where she did private duty nursing for several years. She retired about 1960 and entered the County Home in 1980. She was a member of St. Stephen's Church and the Catholic Daughters of the Americas.

She is survived by two sisters, Rose (Maurice) Willett, 2017 Wyatt Ave., and Loretta (Thomas) Malone, Wausau. She was preceded in death by two brothers.


John Cawley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, July 27, 1946. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

John Cawley

John Cawley, age 76, of Wausau, a former Stevens Point resident, died Thursday night at a Wausau hospital.

Funeral services will be held at Wausau Monday evening at 8:30 o'clock at the Ritter & Deutsch funeral home and at 9 o'clock at St. James Catholic church. Burial will follow in St. Joseph's cemetery there.

Mr. Cawley, a retired real estate broker, was born in Stevens Point on Sept. 25, 1869, and lived here most of the time until locating at Wausau 27 years ago. During his residence in Stevens Point he was engaged in the real estate business. He had never married. Surviving are six nieces and two nephews.


Kate Cawley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, March 27, 1935. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Miss Kate Cawley

Miss Kate Cawley, a native of Stevens Point, died Saturday evening at 9:30 o'clock at a Wausau hospital. She had been in poor health for several years and suffered a stroke Friday evening.

Miss Cawley was the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Cawley, pioneer residents of Stevens Point. During their residence here the family lived on Franklin street. Miss Cawley was born on February 28, 1860. She attended the Old White school and was a member of the Old White School association. She moved to Wausau in 1893 and had made her home there since.

Surviving are two brothers, Michael and John Cawley, both of Wausau, six nieces, two nephews; two grand-nieces and one grand-nephew. Thomas F. Cauley, 307 Pine street is a cousin of Miss Cawley as was also the late John Ryan of Stevens Point.

Funeral services were held Tuesday morning at 9 o'clock at St. James church at Wausau. Rev. F. P. O'Toole officiated and interment took place in St. Joseph's cemetery.

Local relatives were unable to attend the funeral on account of the high water.

Mary McGinley Cawley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, March 16, 1963. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Mary Cawley

Mrs. Mary Cawley, the former Mary McGinley of the Town of Almond, died at St. Mary's Hospital at Wausau at 6 a.m. Friday. Ill for a long time, she had been hospitalized since last August.

Mrs. Cawley was the sister of the Rt.. Rev. Msgr. John R. McGinley, pastor of St. Stephen's Catholic Church, and Miss Nellie McGinley who resides at the rectory at 635 Clark Street

The body is at the Ritter and Deutsch Funeral Home at Wausau, where friends may call after 2 p.m. on Sunday. A general rosary will be recited there at 8 o'clock Sunday night.

Funeral services are scheduled for Monday at 11 a.m. at St. James Catholic Church at Wausau. Mrs. Cawley was a charter member of the congregation that was formed early in this century. Burial will be made later beside her husband and daughter in St. Joseph Cemetery at Wausau.

Mrs. Cawley was born in the Town of Almond, daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John McGinley. She attended the Stevens Point Normal School and taught school afterwards for a number of years at Phillips.

She was married to Michael J. Cawley at St. Martin's Catholic church in the Town of Almond, her home parish, and they lived in Stevens Point for a time, then in Milwaukee and later in Wausau. Mr. Cawley was killed in an oil field accident in Oklahoma in 1931.

Throughout many years at Wausau, Mrs. Cawley had been active in hospital organization and promotion work. She was a member of the Catholic Woman's Club there and also was the first president of the St. James Church Guild.

She is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Wayne (Agnes) Larson, St. Louis, Mo., and Misses Evelyn and Ruth Cawley, at home; a son, Forrest M. Cawley, Manitowoc; her brother, Monsignor McGinley, and two sisters, Mrs. Theresa King, Coos Bay., Ore., and Miss Nellie McGinley.

She was preceded in death by a daughter Lucille and a son Harold, besides her parents and her husband.


Michael J. Cawley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, August 6, 1931. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Funeral of Mr. Cawley

A large number of local people were at Wausau Wednesday for the funeral of Michael J. Cawley of that city, brother of Thomas E. Cauley, Portage county highway commissioner, who died Sunday at Tulsa, Okla., from burns received the day before when flaming fluid from an exploding oil well sprayed his body. Mr. Cawley had been at Tulsa the past two years, where he had been drilling oil on his lease. After watching progress on his well he walked to a nearby well shortly before it exploded in flames. The accident occurred Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock and he died at a Tulsa hospital Sunday afternoon at 1:15 o'clock. Five other men were fatally injured in that accident.

People from this vicinity at the funeral, which took place at 9 o'clock in the morning at St. James church, with Rev. E. P. O'Toole and Rev. John McGinley of Chilton officiating, and interment in St. Joseph's cemetery included: Thomas Cauley, Mrs. William Cauley, Sr., Mrs. William Cauley, Jr., Grace Cauley, Bernice Cauley, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Leary, Mr. and Mrs. Nick Britz, Mr. Alois Gross, Mrs. Frank Jonas, James Welch, Alexander Love, Louis Krembs, Mr. and Mrs. William Badten and Mr. and Mrs. John Tovey. Mr. Cawley was born in the town of Linwood on July 8, 1863, and was married to Miss Mary McGinley of the town of Buena Vista on July 10, 1895. He moved to Stevens Point and was engaged in business here until 1905, when the family moved to Wausau.

He was a member of the Catholic Order of Foresters and the Fraternal Order of Eagles.

Surviving are his widow, five children, Mrs. Agnes Larson of St. Louis, Forrest and Harold Cawley of Tulsa and Ruth and Evelyn Cawley of Wausau; one brother, Mr. Cauley of this city, and three sisters, Mrs. James McCamley of Merrill, Mrs. Nell Tohms of Chicago and Mrs. Gust Johnson of Vicksburg, Mich.

The body was accompanied to Wausau by a son, Forrest, and other members of the family arrived later. Mrs. Tohms and Mrs. Johnson stayed with relatives in this city and attended the funeral at Wausau with them.


William Cawley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, January 19, 1918. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DIED IN TEN MINUTES

Cousin of Portage County Man Is Quickly Taken when Attacked by Heart Disease

The Wausau Record-Herald contains further particulars of the death of William Cauley, a cousin of T. E. Cauley of Stevens Point and William Cauley of Custer, which occurred on Friday. Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Cauley and Mr. and Mrs. William Cauley will go to Wausau Sunday to attend the funeral on Monday. The deceased was known to the older families in Stevens Point. He was born here and went to school in this city. His brother and partner, Michael Cauley, mentioned in the following, is not the Michael Cauley who was in the saloon business a few years ago. The latter is a cousin.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, January 23, 1918:

GETS SUDDEN SUMMONS

William Cawley, Native of Stevens Point, Dies of Heart Trouble at Wausau

William Cawley, a native of Stevens Point and a gentleman who enjoyed a large and favorable acquaintance in this vicinity, died very suddenly at his home in Wausau last Friday. The Wausau Record-Herald contained the following article in regard to his death:
"William Cawley, real estate dealer and well known in business circles of the city, died this morning at 8:30 o'clock at the family residence, 606 McClellan street. Death was entirely unexpected, an attack of heart trouble coming while he was engaged in shoveling snow directly outside the home. Members of the family noticed him fall and physicians were called immediately but death came less than ten minutes after the first symptoms of the attack. Funeral services will be held Monday at nine o'clock at St. James' church, the Rev. Father E. P. O'Toole conducting the ceremony. Interment will be in Pine Grove cemetery.

The deceased was born in Stevens Point June 4, 1861, and was fifty-seven years of age. He spent his boyhood and attended school in that vicinity and later came to Mosinee and Schofield where he engaged in business. Twenty-five years ago he came to the city of Wausau where he has since made a continuous residence, entering the real estate business three years ago. On May 3, 1897, he was married to Jane Alice Maher of this city, who died in October, 1913. He is survived by three children, Katherine Marie, seventeen years of age, Alice Ruth, aged fifteen years and John William, aged ten years, a sister, Miss Kate Cawley of this city, and two brothers, Michael Cawley, a partner in business, and John Cawley of Seattle, Wash., who will not come for the funeral but is expected at a later date."


Andrew Check

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, September 1, 1936. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Andrew Check, 83, a resident of Stevens Point for many years, died Monday afternoon at 3:15 o'clock at the home of his son, Peter Check, 345 Academy street. He fractured his hip on June 25 and had been confined to bed since.

Mr. Check was born in Poland on November 14, 1852. He came to this country at the age of 21 with a brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Anton Corda.

He located in Stevens Point and had been a resident here since. During his early residence here he worked in the woods and was employed by various saw mills here. Later he worked for Reading and Neumann in the ice business for many years and prior to his retirement seven years ago he was employed by the city for 12 years. His marriage to Ludwig Konopacki took place at Polonia 56 years ago. Mrs. Check died nine years ago.

Surviving are three sons, Peter Check, Academy Street, Frank Check, Union street, and Joseph Check, Stevens Point; two daughters, Mrs. Bertha Kuehn and Mrs. Gerald Maine of Milwaukee; two sisters, Mrs. Anton Corda, Prentice Street, and Mrs. Mary Tuszka, North Ave; two brothers, Paul Check, Union street, and Matt Check of Shantytown, and 17 grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

Funeral services will be held thursday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Peter's church. Burial will follow in St. Peter's cemetery. The body was taken this afternoon from the Crosby funeral home to the Check home on Academy street, where it will remain until the time of the funeral.


Matt Check, Sr.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, February 25, 1943. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Matt Check, Sr., a well known town of Bevent, Marathon Co., farmer for 60 years, died at his home at 1:45 o'clock this morning the day after his 99th birthday. He had been in ill health for three months and was confined to bed for the past month.

Mr. Check was born on February 24, 1844, in Poland, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Check. He was married in Poland in 1868 to Josephine Kropedlowski. Accompanied by his wife and oldest son, Charles, he came to this country in 1880 and after residing in the town of Sharon for three years, located on the present farm in Bevent in 1883. His wife died on November 24, 1896. Mr. Check was married in 1898 to Mary Stroik of Sharon in Sacred Heart Catholic church at Polonia. She survives.

Mr. Check was the progenitor of nearly 200 descendants. He was the father of 20 children, 15 of whom are surviving. He has 77 grandchildren and 101 great-grandchildren surviving.

The surviving children are Charles, Joseph, Felix and Barney Check and Mrs. Leo Pepowski of the town of Sharon, Leo and Peter Check of Stevens Point, Walter Check of the town of Reid, Marathon Co., Michael and Sylvester Check of Milwaukee, Mrs. Ray Dulak of Bevent, Anton Check of Chicago, Stanley and Raymond Check at home and Matt Check, Jr., of Fort Leonard, Wood, MO.  A brother Paul Check, lives in Stevens Point. Four daughters, a son, three sisters and a brother preceded him in death.

Mr. Check was a member of the Rosary society of Sacred Heart church. Funeral services will be held Monday morning at 10 o'clock at Sacred Heart church and burial will follow in the parish cemetery. The body may be viewed at the Crosby funeral home from Friday afternoon until Saturday morning when it will be taken to the family home in Bevent. The rosary will be said Friday evening at 8 o'clock at the funeral home and Saturday and Sunday evenings at the Check home.


Paul Check

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, October 31, 1945. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Paul Check, age 82, died Tuesday night at 10 o'clock at the family home at 510 Union street. He had been ailing for some time.

Mr. Check was born in Poland and came to this country 60 years ago. He had lived in Stevens Point since. His wife, the former Anna Kedrowski, died 17 years ago.

Surviving are seven children, Andrew Check, Mrs. Frances Bandow and Mrs. Joseph DeMares of Stevens Point, Mrs. August Rasch and Mrs. Regina Bricco of Milwaukee and John and Jennie at home. He was the last surviving member of his family.

Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 9:30 o'clock at St. Peter's Catholic church with burial following in St. Peter's cemetery. The body is at the Prais funeral home. The rosary will be said Friday evening at 7:30 o'clock.


Peter P. Check

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, November 13, 1976. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Peter P. Check, 77, 2321 Sims Ave., a retired carpenter, died at 3 p.m. Friday at his home. He had been in ill health for two years.

Funeral services will be held Monday morning at 10 at St. Stanislaus Catholic Church, and burial will follow in Guardian Angel Cemetery.

Friends may call at the Dzikoski Funeral Home after 3 p.m. Sunday. The rosary will be said there Sunday night at 7.

Mr. Check was born in Marathon County April 29, 1899, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Check.

He married Susan Yach Oct. 26, 1920, at St. Mary's Catholic Church, Torun. They moved to Stevens Point, and Mr. Check was a carpenter for the Hutter Construction Co. for a number of years. Then he was self-employed until retiring in 1962.

The Checks have lived at their present address for 50 years.

Besides his wife, Mr. Check is survived by a son, William (Bud), at home, a daughter, Mrs. Phil (Etta) Beckowski, Menasha; four brothers, Stanley, Shantytown, Sylvester, 525 Clayton Ave., Matthew, Milwaukee, and Raymond, Shantytown, a step-brother, Walter Check, Bevent; and two sisters Mrs. Katherine Pepowski, Town of Sharon and Mrs. Anna Dulak, Shantytown.

Preceding him in death were a brother, a sister, seven step-brothers and three step-sisters.


Eva B. Chesney

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, November 8, 1993. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Eva B. Chesney, 84, formerly of 1245 Franklin St., died Saturday, Nov. 6, 1993 at the Portage County Health Care Center where she had been a resident for 1 ½ years and in ill health for a year. Services will be held at 10 a.m. Tuesday at St. Peter's Catholic Church. The Rev. Gerald Fisher will officiate. Burial will be in the Guardian Angel Cemetery.

Friends may call from 9 a.m. until service time at the Dzikoski/Pisarski Funeral Home. Miss Chesney was born July 27, 1909, in the town of Carson, to the late Francis and Martha Chesney. She attended grade school in the town of Carson and is a graduate of Emerson High School.

She worked as a waitress at the Belmont Cafe and The Spot cafe in Stevens Point. Survivors include one son, Roman, Stevens Point; seven grandchildren; and one sister, Catherine Pawlowski, Chicago.

She was preceded in death by one sister.


Ksaweri Alex Chilla

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, August 19, 1950. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Ksaweri Alex Chilla, 57, 417 Fifth avenue, died this morning at 5 o'clock at St. Michael's following an illness of two months. He had been a patient at the hospital for the past two weeks.

Mr. Chilla was born Nov. 29, 1892, at Stevens Point and resided here during his entire life. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Anton Chilla.  From 1916 until July 1, 1949, he was employed as a machine tender by the Stevens Point Pulp and Paper company at McDill. For the past year he had been doing carpenter work in this vicinity. He was a member of the Holy Name society at St. Peter's Catholic Church. His marriage to Anna Jakubek took place on June 14, 1929, at Sacred Heart Catholic church at Polonia.

Survivors include his wife; one daughter, Mrs. Clarence Suchowski of 708 Forest street; his mother, Mrs. Mary Blavat of 1016 North Second street; two sisters, Mrs. Vincent Stockfish of 900 North Second street and Miss Anna Chilla of Manitowoc; four brothers, Joseph of Mosinee, Frank of 1016 North Second street, Barney of Milwaukee and Nick of Sturdevant and three grandchildren. His father and a son, Florian, preceded him in death.

Funeral services will be held Monday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Peter's church and burial will follow in Guardian Angel cemetery. The body is at the Prais funeral home where the rosary will be said this evening and Sunday evening at 7:30 o'clock.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, August 22, 1950. Contributed by Betty Martz.

CHILLA FUNERAL

Funeral services for Ksaweri Alex Chilla, 417 Fifth avenue, who died last Saturday, were held Monday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Peter's Catholic church and burial followed in the Guardian Angel cemetery.

Rev. Anthony Krausa was the celebrant at a solemn requiem high mass assisted by Rev. Hilary Simmons as deacon and Rev. John Nowak as sub-deacon. Father Simmons officiated at the burial services.

Pallbearers, all member of St. Peter's Holy Name society, were Joseph Piotrowski, Vincent Suchowski, Frank Kedrowski, John Bombera, Leo Zywicki and Stanley Rompala.

Those from away who attended the funeral included Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Chilla and family of Mosinee; Mrs. Leonard Cater of Wausau; Mr. and Mrs. Barney Chilla, Mrs. Stella Jakubek, Peter Tryba, Mrs. Johanna Barden and son, Eugene, of Milwaukee; Mr. and Mrs. Nick Chilla of Sturdevant; Miss Anna Chilla of Manitowoc and many relatives and friends from Portage county.


Anna Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, March 29, 1951. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Miss Anna Clark

Miss Anna Clark, 88, whose family owned and operated the Clark house, a hotel in Stevens Point, at the turn of the century, died at 7:30 Wednesday morning at an Oshkosh hospital. She had been a patient at St. Michael's hospital after she suffered a fractured hip last June until she was transferred to the Oshkosh hospital in November.

Miss Clark was born Nov. 26, 1862 at Racine, a daughter of the late Michael and Bridget Clark. The family moved to a farm in the town of Lanark when she was four year old. In 1890 they came to Stevens Point where they operated the Clark house, now the Majestic hotel. After the death of her parents Miss Clark and her sister, Miss Dehlia Clark, operated the hotel until 1911. They then resided on a farm in the town of Lanark. After her sister died in 1948 Miss Clark moved back to Stevens Point and she had lived here since.

She is survived by a niece, Mrs. Archie Drake, and a nephew, Larney Priest, both of Mosinee. Also preceding her in death was a brother, John.

Funeral services will be held at 9 a.m. Saturday at St. Stephen's Catholic church, with burial later in the parish cemetery.

Friends may call at the Crosby funeral home after Friday noon. A rosary will be said at the funeral home at 8 p.m. Friday.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, April 3, 1951:

Miss Clark Services

Funeral services were held at 9 a.m. Saturday at St. Stephen's Catholic church for Miss Anna Clark, who died Wednesday at Oshkosh. Rev. John R. McGinley was celebrant at the requiem mass. Interment will be later in St. Stephen's cemetery.

The pallbearers were John Clark, William Clauson, Archie Clark and Michael Clark.

Those present for the funeral from away were Mr. and Mrs. Archie Clark, Neenah, and Mr. and Mrs. Clark and son, John, and Mrs. William Priest, of Mosinee.


Ellen Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, February 28, 1924. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Former Resident Dies in Chicago

The remains of Miss Ellen (Nellie) Clark will arrive here from Chicago on Soo train No. 1 a few minutes before 9 o'clock Friday morning and be taken to St. Stephen's church for funeral services prior to interment beside her parents and brother, Patrick Clark, in St. Stephen's cemetery.

Miss Clark passed away in Chicago Wednesday morning, aged about 65 years. She had been a resident of that city for more than 20 years, moving there from Stevens Point, and had since been associated with her sisters in the restaurant business, first on 12th street and later occupying more portentous quarters on Wabash avenue. Before going to Chicago the Clark sisters conducted a restaurant on Main street for several years, on the present site of the Majestic theatre building. They also conducted what is now the Majestic hotel on South Division street for a few years. Miss Nellie was the oldest of the six sisters and she devoted her attention very largely to preparing the many excellent eatables for which Clark Sisters enjoyed more than local fame.

Deceased was born in Racine county but moved to Lanark, Portage county, with her parents when she was a young girl. She lived on the farm until coming to Stevens Point.

Surviving members of the family are Misses Mary, Anna, Sarah, Celia and Delia Clark of Chicago, John Clark of northern Wisconsin and Lachlin Clark of Lanark.

Death is believed to have resulted from rheumatism, with which Miss Clark had suffered for the past year.


James Lochelin Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, November 22, 1934. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

James L. Clark

James L. Clark, a farmer in the town of Lanark for many years, died this morning at 9 o'clock at the Portage County Home. He had been in ill health for the past two years and entered the home 10 months ago.

Mr. Clark was born on July 1, 1868, at Racine. At the age of six years he moved with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Clark, to Lanark where he had resided since and was engaged in farming prior to his failing health two years ago.

Surviving are one brother, John Clark, and two sisters, Misses Anna and Delia Clark, all of Lanark.

Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Stephen's church and burial will be made in St. Stephen's cemetery. The body will be at the Boston funeral home until the time of the funeral.

Mr. Clark was a member of St. Patrick's church at Lanark during his residence there and was its first altar boy.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, November 26, 1934:

Funeral of Mr. Clark

Funeral services for James L. Clark, resident of the town of Lanark for many years, who died Thursday morning, were held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Stephen's church. Rev. DeLoyd Krembs of Lanark officiated and burial was made in St. Stephen's cemetery.

The pallbearers were Eugene Clark, Archie Clark, James Glennon, John Clark, James Clark and Leon Clark.


John Allen Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, January 9, 1967. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

John Clark

John Clark, 66, died Friday in Butte, Mont., where he made his home.

Mr. Clark spent his youth in the Lanark area, and was employed at papermills in Mosinee and Neenah. He was married to Helen Morgan, a sister of Thomas Morgan of Lanark. Mrs. Clark died in 1928.

Surviving are two sons, Donald, Phoenix, Ariz., and Charles, Torrance, Calif.; one daughter, Mrs. Norman (Joyce) Trainer, Milwaukee; one brother, Clifford, Weyauwega; and 16 grandchildren. One son preceded him in death.

Funeral services are scheduled for 10 a.m. Wednesday at St. James' Catholic Church in Amherst, with the Rev. Ernest Kaim officiating. Burial will take place in the Lower Amherst Cemetery.

Friends may call after 3 p.m. Tuesday at the Jungers Funeral Home, Amherst, where a general rosary will be recited at 8 p.m."

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, January 13, 1967:

Clark Funeral

The Rev. Ernest Kaim officiated at funeral services Wednesday morning at St. James' Catholic Church, Amherst, for John A. Clark.

Mr. Clark, who spent his youth in the Lanark area, died last Friday at Butte, Mont.

Following the 10 o'clock requiem mass, burial took place in the Lower Amherst Cemetery. The pallbearers were Mike Clark, Junior Priest, Richard Hotchkiss,. Wallace Drake, Linford Drake and Tom Trainer.

Relatives and friends attended from Torrance, Calif., Milwaukee, Weyauwega and the Amherst vicinity.


Margaret Nugent Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, December 5, 1908. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

MRS. MICHAEL CLARK

Attack of Pneumonia Proves Fatal After Illness of Two Weeks.

The death of Mrs. Michael Clark occurred at the family home at 132 Plover street at 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon following an illness of two weeks with pneumonia. Mrs. Clark had been in slowly failing health for nearly a year and six weeks ago caught a slight cold and had a very light attack of pneumonia but recovered sufficiently to be about again. Two weeks ago she contracted another cold and her fatal illness followed.

Margaret Nugent was born in Ireland on Nov. 21, 1845, but came to this county with her parents when she was eight years old. The family resided at Markesan for some years and later at Springville, where Mr. Nugent was engaged in running the old grist mill. Afterwards they resided on a farm in Buena Vista. Miss Margaret was married to Mr. Clark on Feb. 13, 1867, and they have resided in this vicinity ever since. For 32 years they were engaged in running the Brinker farm in Stockton, finally removing to their present home in this city four years ago this month.

Mrs. Clark was the mother of eight children, five of whom died many years ago in infancy. The surviving children are Mrs. George Cate of Stockton, Misses Bertha and Cicely of this city. Her only other near relative is her sister, Mrs. J. W. Glennon, also of this city.

Mrs. Clark was a woman of noble character, gentle disposition and generous impulses, and enjoyed the respect and admiration of a host of friends.

The funeral will be held from St. Stephen's Catholic church at 10 o'clock Saturday morning. Rev. W. J. Rice officiating, the interment to follow in the parish cemetery beside the graves of her children.


Michael Eugene Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Weekly Journal, Saturday, December 16, 1893. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Michael Clark, an aged resident of Portage county, died Friday morning between 8 and 9 o'clock at the Central Hotel on the South Side, of which his daughters are the proprietors. Death was caused by asthma, from which he had been a constant sufferer for years. Since 1875 he had lived on a farm in the town of Belmont where he had a large circle of friends. The deceased was born in Mayo, Ireland in 1817 and was therefore 76 years of age. Four sons and six daughters survive him. He also leaves three brothers, who live in Racine and a sister who resides in Sheboygan. The funeral will be held next Monday forenoon at 9 o'clock from St. Stephen's church.

Raymond O. Clendenning

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, July 5, 1979. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Funeral services will be held Saturday for Raymond O. Clendenning, 66, Milwaukee, a Plover native who died Tuesday.

Services are scheduled at 8:45 a.m. at the Schramka Funeral Home, 612 E. Burleigh St., Milwaukee, and at 9:15 a.m. at St. Mary Czestochowa Catholic Church. Burial will be in Holy Cross Cemetery, Milwaukee.

Friends may call from 4 to 9 p.m. Friday at the funeral home, where a parish vigil will be held at 7 p.m.

Mr. Clendenning is survived by his wife, the former Irene Groholski; two children, Mrs. Patrick (Marjean) Koceja and Melvin, Milwaukee; four grandchildren; three sisters, Mae Dakins, in Indiana, Mrs. John (Ruth) Monk, Plover, and Mrs. Wilbur (Eva) Dakins, Wisconsin Rapids; and a brother, Roy, in Indiana.

He was a retired employee of the St. Regis Paper Co. in Milwaukee.


Anna Nugent Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, December 20, 1928. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Last Rites for Pioneer

Rev. Geo. A. Clifford of Menasha, a nephew of Mrs. William J. Clifford, was the celebrant of solemn requiem mass at St. Stephen's church this morning for his deceased aunt when services in her honor were offered up at St. Stephen's church and he later consigned the body to its last resting place in the parish cemetery. Assisting Father Clifford in the church services were the pastor, Rev. Geo. A. Casey, as deacon, and Rev. E. A. Radey as sub-deacon. The casket bearers were Dr. C. von Neupert, Dr. M. A. Hadcock, J. W. Dunegan, P. J. Jacobs, John W. and Frank M. Glennon.

Mrs. Clifford, who was a pioneer resident of Stevens Point and the widow of one of the earliest lumbermen in this section, passed away at Winona, Minn., where she lived of late years with one of her daughters, Mrs. John Shannon. The latter is now laid up with influenza, as is also another daughter, Mrs. Ella Kenefick of Winona, each of them being under the care of a trained nurse. Because of their illness, Mr. Shannon was unable to accompany the remains here but others who came were Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Griffith of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Entzminger and son and daughter, Leon and Miss Lucille Entzminger of Green Bay and Mr. and Mrs. Will Clifford of Milwaukee. Mrs. Griffith and Mrs. Entzminger are daughters of the deceased.


Edward C. Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, November 12, 1937. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Edward C. Clifford

Edward C. Clifford, Racine, a native of Stevens Point and member of a prominent local family, died this morning at 7 o'clock at St. Mary's hospital at Racine, following a major operation performed Thursday. Although he had been in ill health for the past year, Mr. Clifford was up and about attending to his business and he had visited his sister, Mrs. John N. Peickert, 1103 Main street, last summer.

Born in Stevens Point on September 6, 1886, Mr. Clifford was a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Michael Clifford. His father was a local pioneer and a prominent Stevens Point business man for many years. The senior Mr. Clifford built the building now occupied by Montgomery Ward and company, then known as the M. Clifford block, where he operated a clothing and dry goods business for many years. Later he entered the insurance business which he continued for many years until his death.

Edward Clifford attended St. Stephen's parochial school, the Stevens Point public schools and was graduated from the Stevens Point High school. After attending the teachers college for a time he went to Chicago. His marriage to Miss Lillian Jones of Racine took place 27 years ago. After their marriage the couple resided in Chicago where Mr. Clifford was in the building materials business for many years. They moved to Racine 10 years ago and Mr. Clifford had been in the brokerage business there since. Mr. and Mrs. Clifford visited in Stevens Point often.

Surviving are his wife and four sisters, Mrs. W. R. Smith, Mrs. Mayme Bouldron and Miss Genevieve Clifford, all of Seattle, Washington, and Mrs. Peickert. He was a brother of the late Revs. Michael and George Clifford. The late Miss Margaret Clifford, a well known teacher and later an insurance representative here, was a sister.

Funeral services will be held Monday morning at St. Rose's Catholic church at Racine. The body will be at the Thronsen funeral home at Racine until the time of the funeral. Burial will follow in a Racine cemetery. Mrs. Peickert and son, Clifford, expect to leave Saturday morning for Racine.


Rev. George A. Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, November 23, 1931. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

PASTOR LONG PROMINENT IN DIOCESE DEAD

Rev. George A. Clifford, Native of City, Succumbs to Heart Affliction

A heart affliction of two months' duration resulted in the death, at 5 o'clock Saturday afternoon, of Rev. George A. Clifford, pastor of St. Patrick's church of Menasha and one of the leading clergymen of the Green Bay diocese. Although he had suffered slight attacks for several years, Father Clifford failed to heed the advice of specialists and continued in pursuit of his duties until September 19 of the present year when he was stricken seriously ill during a visit to Detroit, Mich.

He was confined in the Jennings Guardian hospital in Detroit until September 24, at which time his condition had improved to a degree that permitted his transfer to St. Elizabeth's hospital at Appleton. The trip was made by automobile and Father Clifford withstood the long drive so well that his condition, upon arriving at St. Elizabeth's hospital, was found to be more encouraging than when he had left the hospital in Detroit.

Returns to Menasha

Two weeks ago he returned to his home at Menasha where he suffered another heart attack on November 14, but since that time he appeared to be regaining strength until Friday of last week when he was again taken ill. This was followed by another attack at 7 o'clock Saturday morning but he rested well until a recurrence of the ailment at 4 o'clock in the afternoon of that day. Death resulted an hour later, just as he appeared to be rallying from the final attack.

Father Clifford was born in Stevens Point on June 7, 1873, and gained his early education in the parochial schools here. He then attended Pio Nono academy and later entered St. Francis' seminary in Milwaukee. He thereafter attended the University of Innsbruck at Innsbruck, Austria, for four years, where he was ordained to the priesthood in 1896. After a year of postgraduate work in Austria, Father Clifford returned to America and was assigned to Appleton as assistant to the Rev. J. Fitzmaurice. There a friendship sprung up between the two pastors, which continued until the death of Father Fitzmaurice about a year ago. The two traveled extensively together and less than two years ago enjoyed a trip to California.

Made Splendid Record

Following his work as an assistant in Appleton, Father Clifford went to Green Bay as assistant to Rev. M. J. O'Brien at St. Patrick's church. In 1899 he took charge of his first pastorate, at St. Augustine's church in Chilton, where he established an enviable record. Property improvement to the extent of $100,000, an unusual amount in those days, was carried out over a period of 16 years, and he left the Chilton parish free of debt when he went to Menasha in 1915 to accept the position of pastor of St. Patrick's church.

His work there was outstanding. Recognized as one of the leading priests, he was considered an authority on canon law, having specialized in that study. He never lost interest in civic affairs and had taken a prominent part in the life of the Twin Cities through the time of his religious work there. He served on the local board of arbitration during the World war and was also a member of the Twin Cities' staff of three-minute men. Nicolet boulevard at Menasha stands as one of the projects fostered by Father Clifford. He served as a director of education in the Green Bay diocese for several years, was an ex-member of the Neenah Rotary club, a fourth degree member of the Knights of Columbus and took a prominent part in establishing Nicolet council of the Knights of Columbus at Menasha.

Because of his success in the church field, it is understand that Father Clifford had been offered the pastorship of St. Peter's church at Oshkosh, where his brother, Rev. Michael Clifford, served as pastor until the time of the latter's death; and of St. Patrick's church at Green Bay. Attached to his parish at Menasha, however, with a devotion that played no small part in his success, Father Clifford declined the offer of transfer to larger cities. It is conservatively estimated that there are 1,000 converts to the Roman Catholic faith as the result of the personal efforts of Father Clifford.

Those Who Survive

Surviving are four sisters, Mrs. John Peickert, Stevens Point; Mrs. William Smith, Seattle, Wash.; Mrs. Blaine Bouldron, Kent, Wash., and Miss Genevieve Clifford, at the Mayo clinic in Rochester, Minn.; two brothers, Edward and Raymond Clifford, Chicago; and a sister-in-law, Mrs. Margaret Clifford, Menasha.

The body was removed from the residence, before church services at 9 o'clock this morning , to St. Patrick's church, where it will lie in state until the hour of the funeral.


John Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Saturday, April 24, 1886. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Death of John Clifford

On Friday afternoon last at 1 o'clock, as briefly announced last week, John Clifford passed to his eternal rest, at the advanced age of 86 Years. The deceased, who was the father of William J. and Michael Clifford, was born in Tipperary County, Ireland, where he resided until 1873, when he came to America to spend the balance of his days with his sons. He has made his home with his son Michael, where all that was possible for dutiful sons and grand children to do was done to make it pleasant for him in his declining years. He was when in his prime a sturdy, robust man and was able to be about until Christmas, since which time he has gradually grown weaker until the final summons came and he passed peacefully away. The deceased was a devout Catholic and was never absent from church unless detained by sickness. The funeral took place from St. Stephens church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock, the services being conducted by Fathers July and McMullen. The funeral was largely attended, there being upwards of seventy five carriages in the procession which followed the remains to the Catholic cemetery, where they were laid at rest in the family burial place.


John James Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Saturday, October 17, 1891. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Death of John James Clifford

The death of John James Clifford occurred at the home of his father, M. Clifford, on Main street on Thursday evening, at 6:40 o'clock. The deceased had been in poor health for two or three years, and last fall was obliged to give up his studies, since which time he has been gradually nearing the end. When they resided at Appleton, he expressed the wish that they might go back to Stevens Point, believing that he might be restored to health if he could return to his old home. But this was not to be. He has been confined to his bed most of the time for the past three months. Last week, realizing the end was approaching, he requested that his brothers Mike and George, students at St. Francis Seminary, be summoned. They arrived on Sunday, and the entire family except one brother, Wm. S., who was in Chicago and did not receive the dispatch in time to reach here before his brother died, were with him in his last moments. The deceased was the oldest son of Michael Clifford, of this city. He was born in Stevens Point, December 2, 1868, and was therefore aged 22 years, 10 months and 13 days. He has resided here all his life, with the exception of the time spent at college. After completing the course at St. Stephen's parochial school in this city, he attended Pio Nono College near Milwaukee, for one year and afterwards attended St. Francis Seminary seven years, studying for the priesthood, and had he not been obliged to give up his studies on account of failing health, he would have been ordained a year from next June. He was a quiet, unassuming young man, very studious and was beloved by his associates and respected by the entire community. A father and mother, seven brothers and five sisters are left to mourn his loss, also a large number of relatives. In their affliction, the family have the sympathy of the entire community. The funeral will be held at St. Stephen's Catholic church on Saturday at 9 o'clock. The services, which will include Solemn High Mass, will be conducted by the resident pastor, Rev. M. J. O'Brien, assisted by Very Rev. J. O'Mally of Oshkosh, Rev. J. D. Schwartzmayer of Custer, Rev. Father Byerle of Grand Rapids, and Rev. W. J. Fitzmorris of Appleton. Very Rev. J. Rainer, one of the faculty of St. Francis Seminary, is also expected. The pall bearers selected are James Dunegan, Peter Jacobs, Frank Glennon, John Quinn, James Quinn, and Wm. Collins, Jr. Interment will take place at St. Stephen's cemetery. The funeral will no doubt be one of the largest ever held in the city.


John William Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, December 26, 1917. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DEATH OF J. W. CLIFFORD

Long Resident and Prominent Business Man of Stevens Point Passes Away at Family Home Monday Afternoon.

CRITICALLY ILL FIVE WEEKS

Deceased was Organizer of Several Logging and Lumber Concerns in Northern Wisconsin.

The death of John William Clifford occurred at 1 o'clock Monday afternoon, at the family home, 833 Clark street. Death was caused by hardening of the arteries. He had been confined to his bed for five weeks and during all of this time the patient was in a critical condition. For two days prior to the end Mr. Clifford remained in an unconscious state. Although never before confined to his bed, the deceased had been in poor health during the summer months.

Mr. Clifford was born in Boston, Massachusetts on May 1, 1859 and was therefore in the fifty-eighth year of his age. When a small boy he came to Wisconsin with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Clifford, the family coming at once to Stevens Point. In his youth he attended the parochial and public schools here and later was a student for one year at Pionana college in Milwaukee.

At the age of 18 he went to Spencer, Wis. to manage a saw mill and store for his father. He remained there five years, being associated in the business with his father during this time.

In 1885 the late Mr. Clifford returned to Stevens Point and became associated with his father and Major Herren now of Fond du Lac, in the firm known as the South Side Lumber company. He also had charge of a saw mill and timber interests at Clifford, Wis. which the company founded at that time. Major Herren's interest was taken over after three or four years by W. J. and J. W. Clifford. The mill at Clifford was operated for five years when it burned. They then disposed of their interests there and commenced business in Butternut, Wis., where they operated a mill and began logging operations, which were continued for five years.

In 1909 the Clifford Lumber company was organized in this city. A new mill was built on the old Bosworth and Reilly site. Logs were brought in by rail and river to this mill. A. M. Fox became interested in the business for a short time after its organization. From that time on the only persons in the concern were Mr. Clifford and his father. The latter died in February, 1911, and from then to 1915 John W. Clifford was the sole owner and manager of the Clifford Lumber company.

In the spring of 1915 the plant was sold but Mr. Clifford retained his lumber and land holdings in different parts of the state. In the spring of 1917 he organized the Badger State Lumber and Land company and operated retail lumber yards at Amherst Junction and Arnott under the management of his oldest son, J. William Clifford. The company had the acquisition of a few more yards in sight when Mr. Clifford was taken ill.

The deceased is survived by the widow, formerly Miss Nettie Short of Spencer, his mother, Mrs. Anna E. Clifford, 433 Strongs avenue, and the following children: J. William Clifford, who was interested with his father in the Badger State Lumber and Land company; Myron J. Clifford, now serving as sergeant on detached service in a school of instruction in France, formerly with the Rainbow division; Kathleen at the family home in this city. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Clifford, two of whom died in infancy.

Five sisters also survive. They are Mrs. John Shannon of Winona, Minn., Mrs. M. Entzminger and Mrs. William Griffith of Green Bay, Mrs. Ella Kenefick of this city and Mrs. A. M. Fox of Seattle, Wash. All of the sisters but the last named are here. Mr. Griffith, Mr. Shannon, Mr. Entzminger and daughter, Miss Lucile Entzminger and Miss Lucille Kenefick, the latter of Winona, are also here.

A continuous resident of Stevens Point for many years, Mr. Clifford was a man of strong personality and excellent business judgment, whose untimely death will be regretted by many friends and relatives.

The funeral will be held from St. Stephen's Catholic church at 10 o'clock Thursday morning. Rev. W. J. Rice will officiate. The remains will be laid to rest in St. Stephen's cemetery.


Margaret A. Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, June 4, 1928. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

MISS CLIFFORD DIES, FUNERAL TO BE TUESDAY

Death Takes Business Woman after Long Struggle with Cancer

A death which had been expected by her close friends for several weeks but which caused profound regret among the entire community and hundreds of others in near and distant places, was that of Miss Margaret Clifford last Saturday afternoon. The fatal summons came at 5 o'clock at the John N. Peickert residence on Main and Reserve streets, where Miss Clifford had been making her home continuously since last August. For a few weeks prior to that time she was at Rochester, Minn., and Detroit, Mich. under treatment for an ailment later diagnosed as cancer, the first symptoms of which became manifest early in July.

Although Miss Clifford received treatment by several of the country's leading specialists and herself carried on a struggle that was little short of heroic, the disease had already secured a too firm foothold in her system to make a cure possible. She never lost her optimism, however, and bore her sufferings with uncommon fortitude.

Educated Here

The deceased was a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Michael Clifford, pioneers of Stevens Point, and her birthplace was in this city on January 24, 1880. As a girl she attended St. Stephen's parochial school, finishing the eighth grade there and then enrolling at the High school. She was graduated from High school and in 1897, when only 17 years of age, was given a teacher's certificate from the State Normal.

Taking up the profession of teaching, she later became principal of eighth grade classes at what is now the Lincoln school, on Water and Elk street, and at the High school.

Twelve years ago Miss Clifford accepted a general agency for the New York Life Insurance company, in which field of activity she was exceptionally successful and because of her large sales was frequently the guest of her employers in journeys to distant places. She also demonstrated in a personal way her utmost faith in the value of life insurance.

Her civic activities included membership on the public library board for several years and as vice-president of the Whiting Country club. She belonged to the Altar society of St. Stephen's church and to the Catholic Woman's club. She also was a former member of the Progress club, resigning when ill health overtook her.

A requiem mass in honor of the deceased, which it expected will be attended largely by children of the parish, will be offered up at St. Stephen's church at 8 a.m. Tuesday, when Msgr. W. J. Fitzmaurice of Appleton will officiate.

Service at 9 A. M.

At 9 o'clock tomorrow a solemn requiem mass in honor of the deceased will be celebrated at St. Stephen's by Rev. George A. Clifford of Neenah, assisted by Rev. James C. Hogan of Oshkosh, Rev. W. J. Rice of Oshkosh and Rev. W. H. Kiernan of Green Bay. A large number of other priests will occupy seats in the sanctuary. The remains will then be borne to their final resting place in St. Stephen's cemetery.

Miss Clifford's mother passed away many years ago and her father expired in 1906. Brothers and sisters who survive are Rev. Father Clifford of Neenah, Mrs. J. N. Peickert of Stevens Point, Mrs. W. R. Smith of Sedro Wooley, Wash., Mrs. Mamie Bouldron of Kent, Wash., Edward C. Clifford of Chicago, Raymond Clifford, now in the south, and Miss Genevieve Clifford of Rochester, Minn.


Margaret Leonard Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Weekly Journal, August 4, 1883. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DEATH OF MRS. CLIFFORD

The announcement Thursday morning of the death of Mrs. Mike Clifford was received with surprise and profound regret. Comparatively few knew that she had been seriously ill, and therefore the news of her death was unexpected. In fact a fatal termination had not been expected even by those acquainted with her condition. Mrs. Clifford's last illness dated from last Sunday evening, for although a little girl had been born to them only about two weeks before, she took supper with the family on Sunday, and was in good spirits and considered convalescent. At about 7 o'clock, however, she was stricken with paralysis, which finally terminated in death. It is thought she had a second but lighter stroke than the first, on Monday. These affected her throat, and from Sunday evening until the time of her death she was unable to take anything but liquid food, and that with difficulty. But she seemed to be improving, and as late as Wednesday evening the family and friends believed that her restoration to health was only a matter of time. With Mrs. Duncan McGregor who was sitting up with her, she talked cheerfully, and evidently had no idea that the end was near. As late as half past 10 o'clock she directed Mrs. McGregor where to find necessary household articles, and an hour later expressed herself as feeling comfortable, and said she would now sleep until morning. A little before 1 o'clock, however, Mrs. McGregor noticed that a great change was taking place. This came without any premonitory warning, and was probably the result of another stroke. Mr. Clifford and the family was immediately called, but even the consolation of a parting recognition from the wife and mother was denied them. She did not speak, and in a few moments, and before the arrival of the doctor, who had been hastily summoned, the heart had ceased to beat, and eight children were motherless.

Mrs. Clifford was a daughter of Wm. Leonard of Stockton, and was in the 39th year of her age. She was the mother of ten children, eight of whom--five boys and three girls--are living; the oldest not quite fifteen and the youngest only a little more than three weeks of age. She was a woman who was universally esteemed, and in her departure a happy home has been robbed of the greatest treasure any home ever had or ever can have--a true and loving wife and affectionate mother. Mr. and Mrs. Clifford had spent all but one year of their married life in this city and both have made hosts of friends who are now mourning for the dead and sympathizing with the afflicted.

The funeral services took place from the Catholic Church Friday morning at 11 o'clock and was attended by a large concourse of people. Six priests took part in the services: Father July, Father Abb and Father Slowisky of this city, the latter of whom acted as assistant priest; Father Beyerle of Grand Rapids, and Father Lager of Medford, who officiated as Deacon and Sub-Deacon in the mass for the dead. Father Schell of Seymour was also present.


Martha Collins Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, March 15, 1922. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

MRS. CLIFFORD HELD IN HIGH ESTEEM BY ALL

Funeral of Prominent Local Woman To Be Held on Friday Morning

The death of Mrs. M. Clifford at her home on Main street Tuesday afternoon removed a member of a prominent Stevens Point family and a woman held in high esteem by all who knew her during her lifelong residence here.

Mrs. Clifford's death resulted from an illness of 19 months with pernicious anaemia. She had been in a critical condition a number of times and while slight improvement followed, little hope had been entertained for her recovery in recent weeks.

Burial on Friday

Burial services are to be conducted from St. Stephen's church at 10 o'clock Friday morning. A requiem high mass will be said at which two sons of the deceased, Rev. M. H. Clifford of Oshkosh and Rev. George A. Clifford of Menasha, and local and other out of town priests will officiate. The remains will be laid to rest in St. Stephen's cemetery beside her husband and other members of her family.

Mrs. Clifford, whose maiden name was Martha Collins, was born November 11, 1853, and was therefore 68 years of age. Stevens Point had been her home practically all of her life. Her marriage to Michael Clifford, a well known merchant of this city for many years, took place on November 17, 1884. Mr. Clifford died 16 years ago in February.

Surviving Relatives

Surviving sons and daughters are Rev. M. H. Clifford of Oshkosh, Rev. George A. Clifford of Menasha, Mrs. J. N. Peickert and Miss Margaret Clifford of the city, E. C. Clifford and Ray L. Clifford of Chicago, Mrs. W. R. Smith of Sedro-Wooley, Wash., Mrs. Blaine Bouldron of Kent, Wash., and Miss Genevieve Clifford, a teach in the schools of Seattle, Wash., and a brother, W. H. Collins of this city.

Devout Church Member

Throughout her life Mrs. Clifford was a devout member of St. Stephen's Catholic church, also holding membership in several organizations with the church, including the Ladies Altar society. Although never active in civic affairs, her Christian life and pleasing personality won her a wide circle of close friends who sincerely regret her death.

All of the children are expected here for the funeral except Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Bouldron and Miss Genevieve Clifford, all of Washington, who will be unable to come. Mrs. Bouldron and Miss Clifford spent most of last summer with their mother here.


Michael Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Saturday, February 10, 1906. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DEATH OF MICHAEL CLIFFORD

Well Known Citizen Sinks Into His Last Earthly Sleep.

Michael Clifford passed away at the family home, 312 Strongs avenue, at 5:30 Saturday morning. As is well known to his friends, Mr. Clifford has been in poor health with heart trouble for several months, but the end, although not wholly unanticipated, came very suddenly. He had a severe attack last Wednesday night, but rallied and had apparently been improving. Friday evening he sat up about an hour and a half, at which time he chatted with the family and fully expected to be able to be up on the morrow. At 4 o'clock next morning Mrs. Clifford was up with him, at which time he appeared to be comfortable and settled down for another sleep. A little after 5 o'clock she heard him cough and spoke to him for the purpose of arousing him. Getting no response she called Miss Margaret and other members of the family who were at home. They raised him up but he quietly passed away, as if in sleep, but without responding or recognizing any of them.

He had been in poor health for the past two years, the heart trouble being followed by dropsical conditions, but he was not obliged to give up business only at intervals until last October. At times he was a great sufferer, but rallied from several severe attacks and even up to the day preceding his death entertained strong hopes of fully recovering his health.

Michael Clifford was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, June 15, 1847, and was next to the youngest of a family of six sons and two daughters, all of whom have now passed away with the exception of one brother. W. J. Clifford, of this city. In 1862 Michael came to America, first stopping at Boston. After remaining there about two years, in the fall of 1864 he came to Stevens Point and with the exception of a short residence at Grand Rapids and a year at Appleton this had been his home ever since. After coming here he clerked in a store for his brother, W. J., for about four years. Still later they had a store at Grand Rapids and in 1869 Michael opened a store for himself in this city, in a building on Main street near where Frank's fruit store is now located. Afterwards he moved into the building now standing on the corner of Main and First streets, near the Curran house. It was when he was in this building that he gave the Journal the first large advertisement it ever had under its present management, and the pleasant business relations commenced then extended over a period of more than thirty years. In 1877 he built the large business block now owned by Green Bros. Upon the completion of the building, he moved in and for some time occupied both stores, one for dry goods and the other for clothing, doing a big business. Later he closed out the business and disposed of the building. In 1890 he moved to Appleton, where for the next year he conducted a large store. Returning to Stevens Point in 1891 he took the special agency of the National Life Insurance company of Vermont, in which he was highly successful, retaining the agency to the time of his death.

Mr. Clifford was twice married, the first time on Jan. 19, 1869, to Miss Mary Leonard. Of this union ten children were born. Two died in infancy and two, John and William, after they had reached young manhood. Of the sons three studied for the priesthood, one of whom, John, died just before his ordination. Those who survived him are Father Michael Clifford of St. Peter's church, Oshkosh; Father George A. Clifford of St. Augustine's church, Chilton; Frank of Milwaukee; Miss Margaret, who for several years has been a teacher in the Stevens Point public schools; Mrs. John N. Peickert of this city, and Mrs. William R. Smith of Marinette. The second marriage, to Miss Martha Collins, occurred in this city Nov. 17, 1884. The children of this marriage are Edward, now located at Fond du Lac; Ray, who is attending school at Watertown, and Robert and the Misses Mamie and Genevieve, who are at home.

In politics Mr. Clifford was a Democrat and for many years took an active part in local political affairs. He was for several years city treasurer, and his name was frequently discussed by the press of the state in connection with a place on the state ticket. In the fall of 1904 his name was presented by his friends in the state convention for insurance commissioner but failed of nomination. He was a member of the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin, the Catholic Order of Foresters, the Knights of Columbus and of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks.


Rev. Michael Henry Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, April 23, 1927. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

REV. M. CLIFFORD DIES AT OSHKOSH OF PNEUMONIA

Operation Ends Fatally for Prominent Pastor, Native of Stevens Point

Rev. Michael H. Clifford, native of Stevens Point and third son of the late Michael Clifford, for many years one of this city's most prominent merchants, died at Mercy hospital, Oshkosh, at 1:30 o'clock this morning from the after-effects of a surgical operation performed a couple of days before, when his gallbladder and appendix were removed.

In placing Father Clifford un the influence of ether, it was necessary to administer unusual quantities, and following the surgical work he was left quite susceptible to pneumonia. Every possible effort was made to ward off this ailment but his lungs became affected yesterday afternoon and he rapidly sank until the fatal ending.

His sisters, Miss Margaret Clifford and Mrs. John N. Peickert, were with him a good part of Thursday and yesterday morning, remaining there until his condition appeared to be hopeful. They again drove to Oshkosh this morning to join another brother, Rev. Geo. A. Clifford of Neenah, who had been at the bedside of the deceased almost continuously.

56 Years of Age

Rev. M. H. Clifford was nearly 56 years of age, his birthday being June 29, 1871. At that time the family home was on Brown street now Normal avenue, the present residence property of Adolph Green. He attended St. Stephen's parochial school until 12 years of age and then enrolled at the Pio Nono college, St. Francis, Wis., where he took up commercial studies until 1884. In the fall of the latter year he and an older brother, John, entered the seminary of St. Francis to begin their classical course and four years later they were joined by another brother, George. Shortly before the time for his ordination to the priesthood, in 1891, John Clifford died.

The two remaining brothers continued their studies, Father Michael Clifford completing his theological course at St. Francis in June, 1893. As he was scarcely 22 years of age, and therefore too young for ordination, a papal dispensation was obtained by the then bishop of Green Bay, the Right Reverend S. C. Messmer, and on November 5, he was ordained at priest at St. Mary's church, Appleton, later going to Oshkosh as assistant pastor of St. Peter's congregation, of which the now deceased Rev. James O'Malley was spiritual head.

Able as Financier

Father Clifford subsequently held pastorates at Lebanon, Berlin and Portage, remaining at the latter place for a period of four years, where his ability as a church financier became especially recognized. During that comparatively brief period he was the principal factor in raising $41,000 among his parishioners, to pay off the church debt and for use in the erection of a new school and parsonage, besides making substantial improvements to the church. When he left there 23 years ago there was no encumbrance on the parish and the treasury had a balance of $1,000.

Following the death of Father O'Malley in 1904, the Reverend Clifford was returned to Oshkosh as pastor and had been there continuously since.

The material improvements made to St. Peter's congregation since Father Clifford took charge were the erection of a Catholic High School and a recreational center costing approximately $100,000. This latter structure, one of Oshkosh's handsomest buildings, was completed last year.

Near Relatives

Near relatives who survive him are the following brothers and sisters: Rev. Geo. A. Clifford, Neenah; Miss Margaret Clifford and Mrs. Peickert, Stevens Point, Mrs. W. R. Smith, Sedro Woolley, Wash.; Edward C. Clifford and Ray Clifford, Chicago; Mrs. Mamie Bouldron, Kent, Wash.; Miss Genevieve Clifford, Rochester, Minn.

Funeral Tuesday

Funeral services will be held at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning at St. Peter's church, Oshkosh, Bishop Paul P. Rhode of Green Bay will officiate at the requiem high mass and burial will be in the parish cemetery of St. Peter's at Oshkosh. The office for the dead will be chanted at 9:30 o'clock by visiting priests.

Sisters of the late Father Clifford who reside in the west, will be unable to come for the funeral.


Myron J. Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, April 26, 1965. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Myron J. Clifford

Myron J. Clifford, who owned the old Lyric Theater in Stevens Point for many years, died April 19 in Tucson, Ariz.

His death occurred at the home of his son, Richard C.

Mr. Clifford was 73, He was born in Stevens Point in 1891, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. William John Clifford. His father was a prominent lumberman here.

Myron Clifford grew up in Stevens Point and served in World War I. In France, he fought in the Luneville Sector, Champagne, Marne Defensive and Chatteau Thierry.

Returning home, he purchased the Lyric, built by his father in 1916 at 454 Main St. He operated the theater until 1924, when he and his wife moved to California. In 1941, they moved to Arizona.

Mr. Clifford continued to own the Lyric property until selling it to a brother-in-law, Lee H. Cranston of Green Bay, in 1961. The Lyric was razed in 1964 and the land on which it stood forms part of the site of the F. W. Woolworth store.

Among Mr. Clifford's survivors are his wife, Mabel; the son, Richard, Tucson; twin grandsons; and a brother, William, Sheboygan.

Services and interment took place in Tucson. World War I veterans were in charge of the burial rites.


Patrick Francis "Frank" Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, April 19, 1909. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DEATH OF FRANK CLIFFORD

Found Unconscious on the Steps of His Lodgings in Milwaukee at 10:45 O'clock Sunday Night.

A telegram which was received by Miss Margaret Clifford at 6 o'clock this morning from her brother, Rev. M. H. Clifford of Oshkosh, told of the sudden death of their brother, Frank, in Milwaukee Sunday night. In today's Sentinel there appeared the following account of the sad affair:

Frank Clifford, aged 34 years, was found dead on the steps of the dwelling of Mrs. N. E. Collope, 421 Marshall street, at 10:45 Sunday night, by Henry De Jong, a roomer. He was taken to the Emergency hospital, but was dead upon arrival there. There were no marks upon his body, except a small cut and scratch above his left eye. He was identified at 1:30 o'clock Monday morning by another brother, R. A. Clifford, a traveling salesman. Death is believed to have been due to heart failure.

Mr. Clifford had been a victim of heart trouble for ten or fifteen years, and while the final announcement of his death came as a shock to the members of the family here, they were not surprised to learn of the end coming as it did. His sister Margaret visited him Milwaukee last summer and he was at that time in very poor health, suffering from periodical heart attacks.

Mr. Clifford was born in Stevens Point April 15, 1875, and during his younger years attended St. Stephen's school and the Business college, and was employed as a clerk in the dry goods store of his father, the late M. Clifford, for a number of years. After the father closed out his business he was employed for a time at Rhinelander and went from there to Milwaukee, where he had been located for about ten years. He was employed most of the time in the Milwaukee railroad offices and also for a time by Romadka Bros. He was unmarried. He had many boyhood friends here, who will regret to learn of his untimely death.

He is survived by two brothers and three sisters, Rev. M. H. Clifford of Oshkosh, Rev. G. A. Clifford of Chilton, Miss Margaret Clifford and Mrs. J. N. Peickert of this city and Mrs. W. R. Smith of Kent, Wash.; also by his step-mother, Mrs. M. Clifford of this city, and three half-brothers and two half-sisters, Edward of Fond du Lac, Robert and Ray of Milwaukee, Miss Mamie of Kent, Wash., and Miss Genevieve of this city.

The remains will be brought here on the midnight train tonight accompanied by his brothers and will be taken to his mother's home at 312 Strongs avenue. The funeral will be held Wednesday at 9 o'clock from St. Stephen's Catholic church.

An inquest was to be held in Milwaukee today but it was not anticipated that anything sensational as to the cause of his death would be developed.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Tuesday, April 20, 1909:

FUNERAL TOMORROW

Rev. M. H. Clifford and R. A. Clifford arrived at 1:45 this morning from Milwaukee with the body of their brother, Frank, who died suddenly in Milwaukee Sunday night. The inquest held over the remains in Milwaukee Monday simply confirmed the previous supposition that death was due to heart failure and not to any murderous assault or other unfortunate circumstances. The funeral will be held from St. Stephen's Catholic church Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock, with Rev. M. H. Clifford, Rev. G. A. Clifford and Rev. W. J. Rice and possibly others in attendance. All the family except the two sisters in Washington will be here for the funeral. Rev. George Clifford has been very ill for the past ten days with quinsy and tonsilitis and at first did not expect to be able to get here.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Wednesday, April 29, 1909:

YOUNG MAN DROPS DEAD

Frank Clifford, Son of the Late Michael Clifford, Expires Very Suddenly in Milwaukee Sunday Evening.

Patrick Frances Clifford, familiarly known to his boyhood and numerous other friends as Frank Clifford, met with a sudden death in Milwaukee, last Sunday evening, due to heart failure, brought on by an acute attack of pneumonia, as revealed in the post mortem which was held the following day. The deceased young man had suffered with heart trouble and other less serious complications for a number of years, and had often expressed the belief that he would die suddenly, being discouraged at times, but nevertheless having no outward fear for the future.

Last Sunday he was about as usual and was met at about 5 o'clock in the evening by his brother, Robt., who chatted with him for a time before parting. He roomed at a private residence on the east side of the city, and evidently started for home at about 10 o'clock. A heavy rain setting in and Frank being without an umbrella, he stopped at the home of Mrs. Collope, 421 Market street, and stepped on the porch to escape its fury. Noticing him without, he was invited to step inside, but excused himself by saying that the rain would be over in a few minutes and he would go on. Some fifteen minutes later a young man who was rooming at the house came along and found him lying on the steps, face downward, where he had evidently fallen from the porch railing. An ambulance was quickly summoned and Frank was removed to the Emergency hospital, but was dead before arriving there. There was no evidence of foul play, and the post mortem revealed the true cause of death.

The deceased young man was born in this city Apr. 7, 1875, at which time his parents resided on Normal avenue, and was therefore a little past 34 years of age. His education was secured in St. Stephen's parochial school and the local business college, after which he entered his father's store as clerk and bookkeeper, later going to Rhinelander, where he remained for some time, but for the past ten or eleven years has been located in Milwaukee. Most of this time he had held a clerkship in the C. M. & St. P. railroad offices, where he was recognized as a most competent employe. Later he entered the employ of Romadka Bros., the truck manufacturers, but for the past few months had been engaged as collector for Collier, the publisher. Frank was a bright young man, industrious and reliable, and those with whom he had been associated for years speak highly of his ability. His sudden taking away comes as a sad blow to his relatives and friends. His father, the late M. Clifford, passed away three years ago last February, and those who survive are his mother, five brothers and five sisters, Rev. M. H. Clifford, of Oshkosh; Rev. Geo. A. Clifford, of Chilton, Miss Margaret, teacher in the 8th grade of our public schools, and Mrs. J. N. Peickert, of this city; Mrs. W. R. Smith, of Kent, Wash.; Edward Clifford of Chicago; Robt. A. and Raymond, of Milwaukee, Miss Mamie of Kent and Miss Genevieve, of this city.

The remains arrived here on the early train Tuesday morning, accompanied by three brothers of the deceased, Rev. M. H., Robt. and Ray, and were taken to the family home, 312 Strongs avenue, from where, thence to St. Stephen's Catholic church, the funeral took place at 9 o'clock this morning, followed by interment in the family lot in the parish cemetery. Solemn requiem mass was celebrated, Rev. M. J. Clifford acting as celebrant, Rev. Geo. A. Clifford as deacon, Rev. W. J. Rice as sub-deacon and Rev. W. J. Fitzmaurice, of Appleton, as master of ceremonies. Rev. L. J. Pescinski of St. Peter's church was also present. All the brothers and sisters were here except the two in Washington, and other relatives and friends from outside the city were J. P. Leonard and Jos. E. Leonard and son, of Stockton, and Miss Jean Whitcher, of Milwaukee. The pallbearers were F. A. Krembs, Wm. Moll, E. A. Krembs, F. M. Glennon, Jos. Koshnick and Frank Peickert. There were a number of beautiful floral offerings. Members of Branch No. 11, Catholic Knights of Wisconsin, to which the deceased belonged, acted as an escort.


Robert A. Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Saturday, February 17, 1917. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

ROBERT A. CLIFFORD

Passed Away in California Hospital As Result Of Pneumonia

Robert A. Clifford, son of Mrs. M. Clifford, 950 Main street, passed away Sunday morning at Roseville, Cal. The first news of the illness of the young man was received by The Rev. M. Clifford of Oshkosh late Saturday night and was immediately transmitted to his mother here. On Sunday a second message was received announcing Robert's death which occurred in a hospital at Roseville at 6:30 Sunday morning. Death came following a short illness with pneumonia.

Robert Clifford was born Sept. 26, 1886, and grew to young manhood in this city. He attended St. Stephen's parochial school and the high school, later taking a course in the Stevens Point Business college from which he graduated. For many years the last ten of which were spent in the west, he had been engaged as a traveling salesman.

MANY RELATIVES SURVIVE

Besides his mother he leaves several brothers and sisters, Rev. M. H. Clifford, Oshkosh; Rev. G. A. Clifford, Menasha; Edward C. Clifford, Chicago; Ray Clifford, St. Paul; Mrs. J. N. Peickert and Miss Margaret Clifford of this city; Mrs. W. R. Smith, Clear Lake, Wash., Mrs. Blaine Bouldron, Kent, Wash. and Miss Genevieve Clifford, Everett, Wash. His father passed away here eleven years ago.

The funeral services were held Tuesday at Roseville, interment being made there. The Rev. Fr. Gavan, who notified the family of the illness of their brother, will officiate.


William James Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, February 14, 1911. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

W. J. CLIFFORD PASSES AWAY

Another Old Resident and Respected Citizen Called to the Other Side.

The many friends of W. J. Clifford were greatly shocked Monday evening, when the announcement of his death at 6 o'clock that evening was made. He had been in declining health for some time, but had been able to be up and about the city up to last Wednesday, when he developed a cold and was compelled to remain indoors. He had only been confined to his bed for the past two days and that was more at the request of his physicians than on account of his ailment. No fear for his recovery had been entertained up to late Monday afternoon, when an attack of heart failure developed and he passed away at the hour above stated.

William James Clifford was born in Ireland on March 10, 1834, coming to this country several years later. After coming to Stevens Point he engaged in the mercantile business, which he carried on for many years, later going into the lumber business, and for a number of years had been interested with his son, J. W., in a saw mill which now stands on the site of the old Bosworth & Rielly mill.

He was a good business man and one in whom the residents of the city had great confidence, and the announcement of his death will be received with much regret.

Besides his wife, who is in very poor health, he leaves one son and five daughters. They are John W. Clifford of this city, Mrs. Griffith and Mrs. Entzminger of Green Bay, Mrs. A. M. Fox of Seattle, Mrs. John Shannon of Winona, and Mrs. Kenefick of Minneapolis.

The funeral will be held from St. Stephen's church at 10 o'clock Thursday morning.

Owing to the shock sustained by his family, we are unable to give a full biography of his life, but hope to be able to tomorrow evening.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Wednesday, February 15, 1911:

WILLIAM JAMES CLIFFORD

Long and Useful Life Ended Last Monday Evening

William James Clifford was born in Nenagh, County Tipperary, Ireland, on March 10, 1834, and was therefore in his seventy-seventh year. Mr. Clifford migrated to the United States in 1852, settling in Boston, where on January 10, 1857, he was married to Anna Nugent. After a residence of twelve years in Boston, he came to Stevens Point in 1864, where he started in the mercantile business in a building which stood about where the Chicago Clothing store is now located. Later he occupied a building where the Raymond & Hazeltine block stands, finally in 1877, erecting the stone building at the corner of Main and Third streets, now occupied by I. S. Hull. He remained in business there until 1879, when he sold out and went into the lumber business at Spencer, where he operated a saw mill until 1885, when, together with his son, John W., and Mr. E. R. Herren, they purchased the Herren and Wadleigh mill, which stood where the Vetter Manufacturing company is now situated, and was known under the firm name of the Stevens Point Lumber company. In 1890 they sold their holdings to the Henry & Coatsworth company of Chicago, who operated the plant for a time. After selling this plant, Mr. Clifford and son purchased the A. P. Vaughn property, which was located near where the Coye Furniture company is now, and operated the South Side Lumber company until 1900, when the Clifford Lumber company was organized and located where their saw and planing mills now stand. During the period in which the South Side Lumber company was doing business, besides their mill here, they had yards at Bancroft, Hancock, Endeavor, and operated saw mills at Butternut and Clifford. While at Spencer Mr. Clifford suffered several quite several losses by fire, but with great determination he continued on and ultimately reached the success to which he was justly entitled.

Mr. Clifford is the last member of a family of eight children. Besides his wife he leaves one son and five daughters. They are John W. of this city, Mrs. John Shannon, Winona; Mrs. Will Griffith and Mrs. Mike Entzminger, Green Bay; Mrs. A. M. Fox, Seattle, and Mrs. Kenefick, Minneapolis. Besides the children, all of whom are here, his son-in-laws, Mess. Shannon of Winona and Griffith and Entzminger of Green Bay, and his grandchildren, Miss Evelyn Fox, William Fox, Myron and William Clifford, Miss Lucile Kenefick and William and Leon Entzminger are also here to attend the funeral.

The funeral will be held from St. Stephen's church at 10 o'clock tomorrow morning, Rev. W. J. Rice officiating. Several priests from out of the city have been invited, but the only ones of whom there is any assurance that they will be present are Fathers George and Mike Clifford and Father O'Brien.

During Mr. Clifford's long residence in the city, he has always been one of our leading business men and all of our citizens have held him in the highest esteem. He has been one of the leading manufacturers and has been a constant employer of labor, and has paid many thousands of dollars to residents of this city, county and surrounding country.

In his death Stevens Point loses a good citizen and he will long be remembered by all who knew him.

His family loses a most devoted husband and father, his family always being foremost in his mind.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Thursday, February 16, 1911:

FUNERAL OF MR. CLIFFORD

The funeral of the late W. J. Clifford took place this morning at 10 o'clock at St. Stephen's church. Solemn requiem high mass was celebrated with Rev. M. H. Clifford of Oshkosh, as celebrant, Rev. G. A. Clifford of Chilton, deacon, Rev. W. J. Rice, sub-deacon, Rev. M. J. O'Brien, of Green Bay, master of ceremonies. The services concluded with an appropriate sermon by Rev. W. J. Rice.

The funeral was largely attended by friends and relatives of the deceased. The active pallbearers were A. R. Week, A. J. Cunneen, G. M. Houlehan, D. E. Frost, E. D. Glennon and J. W. Dunegan. The honorary pallbearers were G. Rood, C. Von Neupert, sr., Ed Dunegan, John Ball and W. B. Buckingham.

The relatives and friends from out of the city were: Mr. and Mrs. John Shannon, Winona; Mrs. A. M. Fox, Milwaukee; Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Griffith, M. E., Leon and William Entzminger, Green Bay; Mrs. Kenefick and Miss Lucile Kenefick, Minneapolis; Myron Clifford, Culver, Ind.; William Clifford, Madison.


William Stephen Clifford

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Saturday, August 5, 1899. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

WILLIAM S. CLIFFORD

Young Man Dies at North Platte, Nebraska.

M. Clifford received a telegram from his sons at North Platte, Nebraska, Wednesday evening announcing the death of his son, W. S. Clifford at that place at 6:05 o'clock that evening. The telegram also stated that the body would arrive here in time to hold the funeral from St. Stephen's church in this city on Saturday morning at 10 o'clock.

William Stephen Clifford was born in this city at the corner of Main and Prentice streets on January 2, 1870. He attended St. Stephen's school as a boy and after finishing the course here, he entered Pionono college, the Catholic normal school at St. Francis near Milwaukee, from which he graduated in 1886. He then entered the commercial department of Catholic university at Notre Dame, Ind., and finished in 1887. At both of these institutions he was rewarded by receiving a gold medal. He returned to Stevens Point and for more than a year held a clerkship with the Wisconsin Central, first in this city and later in Chicago. He then resigned and entered a cutting or tailoring school in Chicago, where he studied for several months. He then went to Appleton where his father's store was then located and remained with him until 1894, having charge of the books. He removed with him to this city in 1892. He went to Wausau in 1891 and became solicitor for a tailoring house and later occupied a similar position with a Rhinelander firm. In 1895 he went into business as a merchant tailor himself and built up an immense trade, soliciting orders from a large territory surrounding Rhinelander. At different times he employed in his shop as many as 14 tailors.

In 1895 he caught a severe cold tramping through the woods among the lumber camps and suffered a hemorrhage at that time, but later recovered and seemed to be in good health up to last winter when he had an attack of grip. He did not recover promptly and in a short time he began to fail in health with great rapidity.

Upon the advice of his physicians he closed up his business at Rhinelander and on April 25, accompanied by his brother. Rev. G. A. Clifford of Green Bay, left for North Platte, Nebraska, intending to go further up into the mountains later, after becoming acclimated. Recovery, however, seemed not to be his portion and the change to the west seemed of little effect. The doctors told he might live one month or twelve. Mrs. Clifford and the little boy went west and Father Clifford returned to his duties at Green Bay. Father Rice, on his way west, visited the sick man, about three weeks ago, and found his vitality very low. He telegraphed and the two Fathers Clifford left on July 17, and have remained with him ever since.

On November 29, 1895, at Rhinelander, Mr. Clifford married Miss Margaret Dockery of Green Bay. They have but one child, a son, William, two years old.

The deceased leaves a father and mother and a large family of brothers and sisters. The latter are Rev. M. H. Clifford of Berlin, Rev. Geo. A. Clifford of Green Bay, P. Frank of Rhinelander, Margaret, Agnes, Alice, Eddie, Robert, Raymond, Mamie and Genevieve, all of whom live at home.

The deceased was a very popular young man, with a strong character and noble purpose, a favorite at home as well as in business and social circles. He was industrious and frugal, though generous when generosity was a real virtue. The family is widely known through this section of the state, Mr. Clifford for many years being one of the most prosperous merchants in this vicinity, and hosts of friends will personally regret that so promising a young man should be stricken at the commencement of his career.

The body will arrive by way of Chicago at 5:15 Friday evening and the funeral will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock from St. Stephen's church. Solemn requiem high mass will be sung. Several priests from out of town are expected to be present and assist in the solemn ceremonial.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Saturday, August 12, 1899:

FUNERAL OF W. S. CLIFFORD

Requiem High Mass Conducted by a Dozen Priests.

The funeral of William S. Clifford was held from St. Stephen's Catholic church Saturday at 10 o'clock. Solemn requiem high mass was conducted by the following priests: Rev. M. H. Clifford, of Berlin, celebrant; Rev. George A. Clifford of Green Bay, deacon; Rev. M. J. O'Brien, of Green Bay, sub-deacon; Rev. Father Fitzmaurice of Appleton, master of ceremonies; Rev. C. N. Rivers priest in charge of St. Stephen's; Rev. L. J. Pescinski of St. Peter's; Rev. Jos. Schemmer, of St. Joseph's; Rev. E. P. Lorrigan of Lanark; Rev. J. A. Bourgmeyer of Custer; Rev. J. Miller of Junction; Rev. F. Jackimiak of Mill Creek; Rev. Fr. Pocieka of Plover.

The honorary pall bearers were Martin Lally, Jerry Moore, Jos. Crow, James Gleason, Thomas Doyle and Tim. O'Connell of Rhinelander, representing the Foresters and Knights of that city.

The active pall bearers were F. A. Krembs, G. M. Houlehan, J. W. Glennon, F. Blood, jr., Lucas Moll and P. J. Jacobs.

The body was followed to the cemetery by over thirty of the local representatives of the Knights and Foresters on foot and many friends in carriages.

Those from out of town who attended besides those mentioned above were Frank Clifford, Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Brennan and Mrs. Giles Coon of Rhinelander, William H. Collins of Portage, John Dockery and Mrs. George Stenger and daughter of Green Bay.

The services, both in the church and at the grave were unusually impressive and interesting.


Mary Folland Clinton

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Weekly Journal, Saturday, December 27, 1890. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. G. B. Allen, near Amherst, Mrs. Clinton, Dec. 25th, 1890, aged upwards of 80 years. Mrs. Clinton has been a resident of this town upwards of thirty years. She was a lady highly respected by all who knew her. She leaves several children, all grown to manhood and womanhood, to mourn the loss of a kind mother and friend.

Charles Coates

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Saturday, September 1, 1900. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

FOUND DEAD IN BED

Chas. Coats Succumbs to Heart Disease During the Night.

Chas. Coats was found dead in his bed at the home of his step-son, Chas. Shortell, at 710 Water street, at 6:30 this morning, the cause of death being heart trouble, with which he had suffered for years. He retired as well as usual Thursday night.

Mr. Coats was born in England on December 19, 1819, and came to America about 1853. He was twice married, but has been a widower for many years, making his home with his children. For the past two years he has been in many ways an almost helpless invalid, requiring the most careful attention.

He leaves one son, John Coats, a civil engineer of San Francisco, and three step-children, Mrs. Lyman Precourt and Mrs. E. Bosley of Buena Vista and Chas. Shortell of this city. He was a very gentle, kindhearted and honest old gentleman and tried to be agreeable in spite of his infirmities.

The funeral was held from the church in Buena Vista Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The remains will be removed from the house here at 11 o'clock.


Anastasia Riley Collier

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, March 17, 1958. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. John A. Collier

Services were held last Friday morning in St. Rose's Catholic Church,. Clintonville, for Mrs. John A. Collier of Clintonville, a former resident of the Towns of Lanark and Belmont.

The body was brought to St. Patrick's Cemetery in Lanark afterward for burial beside the grave of her husband. Mr. Collier died about three years ago.

Mrs. Collier, who was 52 years old, died in the Clintonville Hospital last week. She was scheduled for surgery.

The former Anastasia Riley was born in Lanark, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Riley. She spent her girlhood there.

After her marriage, Mr. and Mrs. Collier lived in Belmont until several years ago. She had lived since in Clintonville.

Surviving are two sons, Jack and William, and two daughters, Mrs. Carol Shippy and Miss Cecile Collier, Clintonville; a brother, Anthony Riley, Lanark; and a sister, Eleanor, Neenah.

An infant son, Richard, and two sisters, Mrs. Gertrude Peske and Mrs. Mayme Sutheimer, preceded her in death.

Attending the services were relatives and friends from Milwaukee, Little Chute, Waupaca, Appleton, Neenah, Almond, Amherst and Clintonville.


John Adrian Collier

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, June 1, 1954. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

John Collier

John Collier, 54, a former resident of the town of Almond, died suddenly at 11 a.m. Sunday at the Clintonville Community hospital.

Mr. Collier had lived in Clintonville for the past 20 years and was employed at the Four Wheel Drive plant there.

Services will be held Wednesday at 9 o'clock at St. Rose Catholic church, Clintonville, with burial following in St. Patrick's cemetery, town of Lanark, Portage county.

Survivors include his father, Clarence Collier, town of Almond, his wife; two daughters, Mrs. Bob Shippy and Miss Cecile Collier, Clintonville, and two sons, Jack and Bill, Clintonville.

The body is at the Heuer funeral home, Clintonville.


Borden James Cooney

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, May 24, 1943. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Borden Cooney, age 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Cooney of the town of Lanark, died this morning at 2:10 o'clock at St. Michael's hospital. In former years he had been in frail health but recently his health had improved, and his death followed a one day's illness. He had worked Saturday and Sunday morning, became suddenly ill and lapsed into a coma. The young man was brought to the hospital Sunday night.

He was born on October 2, 1925 at the Cooney homestead in Lanark where he spent his entire life. surviving are his parents and five sisters, Maxine, Ruby, Jean, Leona and Janet.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Patrick's Catholic church at Lanark, Rev. Walter T. Williams will officiate and burial will follow in the parish cemetery. the body is at the Jungers funeral home at Amherst.

Obituary, unidentified Portage Co., Wisconsin newspaper, May, 1943:

Borden Cooney, age 17, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Cooney of the town of Lanark, died this morning at 2:10 o'clock at St. Michael's hospital. In former years he had been in frail health but recently his health had improved, and his death followed a one day's illness. He had worked Saturday and Sunday morning, became suddenly ill and lapsed into a coma. The young man was brought to the hospital Sunday night.

He was born on October 2, 1925, at the Cooney homestead in Lanark where he spent his entire life. Surviving are his parents and five sisters, Maxine, Ruby, Jean, Leona and Janet.

Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Patrick's Catholic church at Lanark, Rev. Walter T. Williams will officiate and burial will follow in the parish cemetery. The body is at the Jugers funeral home at Amherst.


Catherine Sullivan Cooney

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, December 27, 1921. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

MRS. E. F. COONEY DIES AT AMHERST CHRISTMAS MORN

Funeral Wednesday With Interment in Cemetery At Lanark

Mrs. Edward F. Cooney passed away at her home in Amherst Christmas morning at 10 o'clock , after an illness covering a period of several months.

She had been a patient in the Marshfield hospital at different times for transfusion of blood, and for a time she seemed to be benefited by these treatments, although the last month she has been gradually growing weaker and the family realized that the end was nearing.

Her husband passed away last July. She leaves a family of three children, two daughters, Mrs. Marguerite Glodusky and Grace Cooney, one son, Emmett Cooney, all at home. Two brothers, Patrick Sullivan of Locke, Wash., and Daniel Sullivan, some where in the west. She also has one sister, Miss Ellen Sullivan Leahy of Portland, Ore.

The funeral will be held Wednesday with interment in the Catholic cemetery in Lanark.

Mrs. Cooney was loved and respected by all her neighbors and acquaintances and the deepest sympathy is extended to her family in their great sorrow.


Edward F. Cooney

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Wednesday, August 3, 1921. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

EDWARD COONEY PASSES AWAY AT AMHERST HOME

Lifelong Resident of Portage County Succumbs After Third Stroke

Edward Cooney, a lifelong resident of Portage county and one of its best known citizens very unexpectedly at his home in Amherst village Saturday at 7 o'clock. Mr. Cooney suffered a third stoke of paralysis last Tuesday morning and was unconscious most of the time until relieved by death.

Sixty Years Old

He was upwards of sixty years of age, operated a farm in Lanark for many years, later moving to Stevens Point. Some eight or ten years ago the family became residents of Amherst where the husband and father was engaged in business.

His wife was Miss Kate Sullivan, member of a prominent family in Lanark. Besides the widow he is survived by two daughters and a son, Mrs. Hans Glodosky, Miss Grace Cooney and Emmet Cooney, all of Amherst.

Funeral Tuesday

Funeral services will be held at St. Patrick's church, Lanark, next Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. A. J. Quella officiating. The remains will be buried in the adjoining cemetery.


James Cooney

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Wednesday, September 10, 1902, page 8. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

JAMES COONEY

James Cooney, one of the best known residents of the town of Lanark, died at his home, last Wednesday morning, after an illness of about two months with kidney troubles. In fact, Mr. Cooney had not been feeling well for the past few years, and was nigh unto death's door for some time about one year ago, but recovered to all outward appearances, and seemed to have a future before him of a number of years until stricken a couple of months ago.

The deceased gentleman was born in County Roscommon, Ireland, about 60 years ago, and came to this country and to the town of Lanark in the early 50's. He served with Co. E, 32nd Wisconsin regiment, as a private, during the civil war, and his last visit to Stevens Point was during the recent Grand Army Encampment. He was a man of excellent ability, the possessor of a good education, and during the many years that he resided in Lanark, served that town in various capacities, being its chairman for several terms, and was recognized as one of the most valuable, straight-forward men on the county board. All who know him have none but good words to say in his memory, and regret his departure from this life. Mr. Cooney was never married, and for a number of years his brother, Ed. Cooney, and wife, had resided with him. He is survived by four brothers, Martin, of Waupaca Veterans' Home, Ed. and Lawrence, of Lanark, and Michael of the Milwaukee Veterans' Home.

The funeral took place from St. Patrick's church, in the town of Lanark, last Friday morning. The pallbearers were Jas. Stanfield, Alex McGregor, Michael Lynch, John Hopkins, Anthony Lally and John O'Herron.


James Thomas Cooney

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, January 26, 1945. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

James Thomas Cooney

James Thomas Cooney, 69, a life long resident of the town of Lanark, died at his home at 4:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. He had been ill since last August.

Mr. Cooney was born on Sept. 5, 1875, in Lanark, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Cooney. His marriage to Clara Lynch took place in 1914. He is survived by his widow and the following daughters: Maxine, Ruby, Jean, Leone and Janet, all at home. Mr. Cooney also is survived by one brother, Ed., of Crandon, and three sisters, Mrs. Frank Droske of North Dakota, Mrs. L. P. Moberg of Waupaca and Mrs. James McTigue of Lanark.

He was a member of St. Patrick's Catholic church in Lanark and its Holy Name society.

Funeral services will be held Saturday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Patrick's church with burial following in the parish cemetery. The body is at the Jungers funeral home at Amherst.


Martin Cooney

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, May 4, 1911. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DEATH OF MARTIN COONEY

Another Veteran of the Civil War Passes Away

Martin Cooney, a Civil war veteran, passed away at the home of his brother, Edward Cooney, 316 Madison street, this morning. Death followed a long illness with diabetes. He was at the Wisconsin Veteran's home at Waupaca until ten days ago, when he was brought to this city. Two brothers, Michael of Milwaukee and Edward of this city, were with him at the time of his death. Another brother, Lawrence, is near Superior, but has not been found, and is as yet unaware of his brother's death.

Mrs. Theressa Droske of Amherst and Mrs. Mayme McTigue of Lanark, nieces of the deceased, are also in the city. Another niece, Mrs. Margaret F. Moberg, lives at Lanark.

He was born in 1840, in the county of Roscommon, Ireland, and came to this country when eleven years old. He was a member of company H, 11th Minnesota Infantry.

The funeral will be held from St. Patrick's Catholic church in Lanark, Saturday forenoon, Father Meagher officiating. Interment will be made in the parish cemetery.


Thomas Cooney

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Tuesday, April 7, 1897, page 4. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

THOS. COONEY

Thomas Cooney, a resident of the town of Lanark for about forty years, died at 4 o'clock on Tuesday morning after an illness of about one year, for the past four weeks of which he had been confined to his bed. The cause of his death was paralysis, brought on by excessive bleeding from the nose, for which there seemed to be no permanent cure. The deceased gentleman was a native of County Roscommon, Ireland, and he came to this country when a young man, locating on a farm in the town of Lanark, where he had been successful. For fourteen years he served as a supervisor of his town, on the side board, and was a most honorable man, respected and esteemed by all. He was about 62 years of age, and his death is deeply regretted. His wife died about four years ago, and he leaves two sons, Ed. and Jas., and three daughters, Misses Maggie, Mamie and Tessie, besides three brothers, James and Edward, of Lanark, and Mart., of the Waupaca Veterans' Home. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock on Thursday morning from the Catholic church in Lanark.


Basil Howard Corrigan & Howard Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, October 29, 1927. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Basil Corrigan and Nephew Fatally Hurt in Minnesota

Tragedy struck a double blow at Parent, Minn. Friday in the Corrigan family which formerly lived at Custer, when Basil Corrigan and his nephew, Harold Corrigan, a boy of 10, were fatally injured in an automobile accident. Harold is a son of John Corrigan and John and Basil are sons of the late James Corrigan, who died only two weeks ago at his farm home near Parent.

Harold Corrigan died Friday noon and Basil died this morning, messages received by relatives at Custer stated. Mrs. Rose Cauley of Custer, a sister of the late James Corrigan, who went to Minnesota with other relatives from here for the funeral of her brother, returned only Friday, accompanied by Ray Corrigan and Mr. and Mrs. Myron Corrigan of St. Cloud. When they reached the Cauley home a message was awaiting them there informing them of the accident, and of the death of the boy. Another message was received at 4 o'clock this morning, just before the Minnesota residents left on their return trip, stating that Basil Corrigan was sinking rapidly. Subsequently a message came announcing his death.

While details were not learned, it was indicated in the messages that the car occupied by the two victims collided with a train.

Mrs. J. E. Leary, south Third street, is a sister of Mrs. James Corrigan. A number of relatives are planning on leaving tomorrow to attend the funeral services for the two victims. Basil Corrigan was married and leaves his wife and one child.

The double tragedy is a particularly hard blow to Mrs. James Corrigan, the widow, who is now called upon to mourn the deaths of her son and grandson within a short time after the passing of her husband.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, November 5, 1927:

Attend Two Funerals

Relatives of the late Basil and Harold Corrigan of Parent, Minn., fatally hurt in an automobile accident more than a week ago, who attended their funerals last Monday, included Mrs. James P. Dineen, Amherst Junction: Mr. and Mrs. Claude Dineen, Amherst: Mrs. William Cauley, Sr., Mr. and Mrs. T. H. Leary, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Leary, Custer: Mrs. John T. Tovey, Fremont: Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Leary, Charles Dineen, Mrs. M. O'Keefe and Leonard O'Keefe, Arnott: Mrs. N. M. Britz and Daniel Dineen, Stevens Point: Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Kane and son, Leo, Fairbault, Minn.

Harold Corrigan was buried from St. Lawrence's church, Duelm, Minn., at 9 a.m. and services for Basil Corrigan were conducted at St. Patrick's church, Parent, at 11 o'clock the same day. Both services were very largely attended. Eulogies to the deceased uncle and nephew were delivered by the pastor, Father Croll. They were about to drive over a railroad crossing when their car was struck by a train, demolishing the automobile and hurting the occupants so badly that they died within a few hours. Mr. and Mrs. James P. Corrigan, were former residents near Custer, this county.


Edward Franklin Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, November 14, 1917. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

MAN SMOTHERED UNDER A HORSE

Edward F. Corrigan, Well Known Resident of Buena Vista, Loses His Life in a Peculiar Way ........ Slips off a Culvert

Buggy Tipped over into a Ditch and Man is Found Suffocated When Taken Out

Edward Franklin Corrigan of Buena Vista was smothered to death when thrown under a horse one half mile north of Liberty Corners shortly after seven o'clock Tuesday evening. The victim, together with Frank Meronek, also of Buena Vista was returning home from Arnott village when the accident occurred. They were driving two horses, one of them being owned by Corrigan and one by Meronek. At the scene of the accident a culvert crosses the road and the team was driven so near the edge of the crossing that one of the horses lost its footing, upsetting the buggy and throwing Corrigan into the ditch. The horse fell upon the man, pinning him to the ground, where he lay for nearly thirty minutes. When removed, he was dead. Corrigan's injuries include a scratch on his forehead and a dislocated hip.

What became of Meronek after the accident is not known, although it is believed that he continued to his home with his horse. The accident was discovered shortly after its occurrence by a man employed on the Roy Adams farm, which is located about 20 rods from the culvert crossing. He heard the crash and went immediately to the place. Coroner H. D. Boston was summoned and brought the body to his undertaking parlors in this city.

Edward Franklin Corrigan was born in Stevens Point on April 30, 1862, and was a continuous resident of Portage county. Until six years ago he lived with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Corrigan, in this city and then the family moved to the old homestead in Buena Vista. The deceased was a single man. His parents are both dead. He had been living with his brother, William Corrigan, at the old home.

Eight brothers and sisters survive. They are James Corrigan of Hamilton, Hamilton Co., Texas, Mrs. P. J. Hopkins of Ione, Wash., George Corrigan of Long Beach, Los Angeles Co., Cala., Mrs. John Gray of Lanark, Mrs. J. R. Morgan, 217 Church street, this city, Mrs. J. J. Ryan, 506 South Reserve street, and Mrs. T. J. Brown, 744 Strongs avenue, city, and William Corrigan of Buena Vista. The deceased was an uncle of Walter D. Corrigan of Milwaukee.


George Henry Corrigan

Reprinted from the Long Beach Press Telegram, Long Beach, Los Angeles Co., California, September 21, 1939, page B-10: obituary, page A-4. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

George H. Corrigan, 83, of 85 West Plymouth Street, veteran of Indian wars, died Tuesday at Veterans Facility Hospital, West Los Angeles. He was a native of Fulton, Ill. He lived for a time at Stevens Point, Portage Co., Wis., where he was employed by the Northern Pineries Company in lumber work. He served in the Regular Army and was wounded in Indian wars and hospitalized at Fort Sill, Okla. He pioneered in western Oklahoma and the Panhandle and located at Elk City and Cheyenne prior to coming to California in 1910 and to Long Beach in 1915. He was a building contractor for 50 years.

Surviving are the widow, Mrs. Mollie Corrigan; six sons, Clarence, Lawrence H., Emmet J. Corrigan, all of Long Beach;, Leonard E. and Leo G. of Los Angeles and James B., Oklahoma City, & four daughters, Mrs. Gertrude Porter, Mrs. Genevieve Veino, Mrs. Agnes Wilhelm, all of Long Beach, and Mrs. Cecilia Ziengg, Canute, Okla.

The funeral service will be at 2:30 p.m. Friday at the chapel of B. W. Coon Funeral Home. Rev. Alan S. Pearce, assistant pastor of First Brethren Church, will officiate. Interment will be at Sunnyside Memorial Park.

Funeral notice, same newspaper, same day:

CORRIGAN--George H., aged 83, late of 5366 Pacific Avenue, passed away September 19 at a Los Angeles hospital. survived by widow, Mrs. Molly Corrigan; six sons and four daughters. member of Firth Brethren Church. Services Friday, 2:30 p.m., at the B. W. Coon Funeral Home, 1017 Obispo Avenue. Rev. Alan S. Pearce officiating. Interment, Sunnyside Memorial Park.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, September 21, 1939:

OBITUARY

George H. Corrigan

Word of the death on Tuesday at Long Beach, Los Angeles Co., California of a member of a pioneer Portage County family and a former well known contractor in this vicinity, George H. Corrigan, has been received by local relatives.

Mr. Corrigan, who was 83 years old, was born on June 20, 1856, in Illinois, a son of James and Letha Corrigan. The family came to Stevens Point and the son attended the Old White school here. They then moved to a farm in Buena Vista where George Corrigan was married to Sarah Kirby, also of Buena Vista. After their marriage the couple located on land adjoining that of Mrs. Corrigan's parents, on which Mr. Corrigan built a home. They were the parents of three children, born at the Buena Vista farm home, all of whom survive. They are George H. Corrigan of Amherst, Mrs. F. R. Poust, 628 Brawley street, Stevens Point, and Mrs. O. E. Carpenter of Almond. Mrs. Corrigan died on June 7, 1884.

After the death of his wife, Mr. Corrigan went to Hico, Texas, where his marriage to Miss Molly Richardson took place on September 28, 1886. The could continued to live at Hico for a time and then came to Stevens Point. During his residence here, Mr. Corrigan was employed on the construction of the present Central State Teachers college. The family then moved to Oklahoma and 26 years ago located at Long Beach. During part of his residence at Long Beach Mr. Corrigan was employed by the school board at carpentry and repair work. Prior to that he was a contractor and builder.

Mr. Corrigan was the father of 11 children by his second marriage, 10 of whom survive.

Surviving besides his wife, the 13 children, several grandchildren and great grandchildren, are a sister, Mrs. T. J. Brown, 732 Strongs avenue, and a brother, William Corrigan of Marshfield. They are the last surviving members of a family of 16 children.

Mr. Corrigan, who was a Civil war veteran, visited his children and other relatives in Portage county nine years ago.

Funeral services will be held Friday at Long Beach.


George Henry Corrigan, Jr.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, November 18, 1946. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

OBITUARY

George H. Corrigan

George H. Corrigan, age 69, a member of a pioneer town of Buena Vista family, died Friday afternoon at 4:20 o'clock at St. Michael's hospital following an illness of 10 years. He entered the hospital on Oct. 28.

Mr. Corrigan was born on June 12, 1887 [sic], in Buena Vista where he had lived all of his life with the exception of three years, which he spent in Stevens Point. He was a son of the late George and Sarah Corrigan. His marriage to Miss Mary Hopkins of Lanark took place on Sept. 6, 1909, in Lanark.

Surviving are his wife, seven children, Mrs. Dan Helbach of Buena Vista, Miss Mary Corrigan at home, Lawrence Corrigan of Milwaukee, James of Waupaca, Mrs. Robert Kuhrt of Almond, Mrs. Charles Hoben of Tucson, Pima Co., Ariz., and Mrs. Elmer Berto of Amherst, two sisters, Mrs. Frank Poust, 932 Clark street, and Mrs. Oscar Carpenter of Almond, who is a patient at St. Michael's hospital, 13 grandchildren and three great grandchildren. A son, Walter of Buena Vista, died in 1940.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Patrick's Catholic church in Lanark and burial will follow in the parish cemetery. The body is at the Dan Helbach home where the rosary will be said this evening at 8:30 o'clock.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, November 22, 1946:

Funeral of Mr. Corrigan

Relative and friends of the late George H. Corrigan of the town of Buena Vista, who died last Friday, attended funeral services for him Tuesday morning. Rev. A. J. Baier was the celebrant of a solemn requiem high mass at 10 o'clock at St. Patrick's Catholic church at Lanark. He was assisted by Rev. James Geyer and Rev. John P. Trant. Miss Barbara Van Hecke played and sang a requiem mass. Burial followed in the parish cemetery.

Pallbearers were Patrick Gray, Hi Clinton, Frank Polly, Harry Soper, Will Warner and Hugh Leary. The flowers were carried by Walter Kuhrt, Edward Helbach and Jimmy Berto, grandsons of Mr. Corrigan.

Coming from a distance were Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Corrigan and family, Mr. and Mrs. John Sans and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Hopkins, Mr. and Mrs. Ruben Carpenter and Mrs. Andy Cheseck and son of Milwaukee; Mrs. B. L. Sans of Ripon; Mrs. Martie Arno of Menasha; Mrs. Frances Fellner of Antigo; Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Berto and family, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Helbach and son and Mr. and Mrs. E. Jensen of Amherst; Mrs. Fred Berto of Wittenberg; Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kuhrt and family, Mrs. Hannah True, O. E. Carpenter, Clarence Collier and Peter Jacobs of Almond; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Poust, Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. Pat Hopkins and family, Hugo Carpenter, Mrs. George Turrish, Mrs. Jess Bentley and James and Tom McTigue of Stevens Point; Mr. and Mrs. James Corrigan, Mr. and Mrs. John Blickel, Gerald Hopkins, Mr. and Mrs. William Ewald, Mrs. J. C. Ashdonn, Mrs. Lenor Ewald, Mrs. Clara Glaesner and Mrs. Henry Ewert of Waupaca; Mr. and Mrs. Francis Lebrick and family of Plover; Mrs. Pat Higgens of Amherst Junction and many others from Buena Vista, Lanark and vicinity.


Hellen Dickson Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, November 29, 1945. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

CORRIGAN: Hellen (nee Dickson), town of Mequon, entered into rest Wed., Nov. 28, at the age of 92 years, beloved mother of Walter D. Corrigan, Sr., and grandmother of Helen F. Iekel of Detroit, Michigan; Jessie Corrigan Pegis of Toronto, Canada; Thomas M. and Walter D., Jr. of Cedarburg, Wis.; further survived by 10 great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Funeral services Sat., Dec. 1, at 1 p.m. at the Goult Funeral Parlors at Plainfield, Wis. Interment Lone Pine cemetery in Portage county. In state at the Bannenberg Funeral Home at Cedarburg, Wis., Fri., Nov. 30, from 3 p.m. to 10 p.m.


James E. Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, January 25, 1925. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

James Corrigan Dies at Hamilton, Hamilton Co., Texas
Was County Pioneer

James E. Corrigan of Hamilton, Hamilton Co., Tex., an early day resident of Portage county and widely known among its older residents, passed away at 1:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon at his home at Hamilton, Hamilton Co., Tex., according to a telegram received early this morning by Mrs. T. J. Brown, Stevens Point, a sister.

Cause of the death of Mr. Corrigan was not stated in the message, but it is believed here that his passing was partially the result of a stroke of paralysis which he suffered some ten years ago. He had not been in good health since that time.

Mr. Corrigan, who was father of Walter D. Corrigan of Milwaukee, a prominent attorney in the state, spent his youth in this county, but left when a young man. He has lived in Texas for the past fifty years. Walter D. Corrigan was born in this county.

Mrs. T. J. Brown, Mrs. J. R. Means and Mrs. J. J. Ryan of Stevens Point and Mrs. John Gray of Amherst, are sisters of the deceased. The widow and a large family survive Mr. Corrigan.

When the funeral will be held is not known, as no information to that effect was included in the telegram.

Mr. Corrigan was proprietor of a large store at Hamilton.


James E. Corrigan, Sr.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, May 2, 1977. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

JAMES E. CORRIGAN SR.

James E. Corrigan Sr., 67, a town of Lanark native, died Saturday morning at Riverview Nursing Home, Waupaca.

Funeral services will be held at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday at St. Mary Magdalene Catholic Church, Waupaca. The Rev. Orville Catuso will officiate. Burial will be in St. Patrick's Parish Cemetery, Town of Lanark.

Friends may call after 4 p.m. today and until services Tuesday at the Holly Funeral Home, Waupaca. A prayer service will be held at 8 tonight.

Mr. Corrigan was born April 4, 1910 in Lanark, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. George Corrigan. He married Mabel Ewald on Aug. 10, 1946, in Lanark. She died on March 19, 1959.

He was a sheet metal worker in the Waupaca area, and was a member of the Veterans of Foreign Wars.

Survivors include one son, James Jr., Hortonville; one daughter, Mrs. William (Laura) Manney, Waupaca; one brother, Lawrence, Amherst; four sisters, Mrs. Walter (Mary) Krause, Almond, Mrs. Robert (Gertrude) Kuhrt, Oshkosh; Mrs. Elmer (Bernice) Berto, Amherst; and Mrs. Robert (Gwendolyn) Talik, Vancouver, B. C., Canada; and four grandchildren.

One brother and one sister preceded him in death.

Unidentified Portage Co., Wisconsin newspaper, May 4(?), 1977:

James Corrigan Sr.

James Corrigan Sr., 67, 725 E. Fulton, Waupaca, died on Saturday, April 30, at 8 a.m. at the Riverview Nursing Home in Waupaca.

A U. S. Army veteran in World War II and retired sheetmetal worker with the Bille Sheetmetal Co., Waupaca, Mr. Corrigan was born on April 4, 1910 in the Town of Lanark, Portage County and was married on Aug. 10, 1946 in the Town of Lanark to Mabel Ewald who preceded him in death in March 1959.

Survivors include one son, James Jr., Hortonville; a daughter, Mrs. Laura Manny, Waupaca, an employee of the Waupaca Publishing Company; his mother-in-law, Mrs. Lena Ewald, Waupaca; one brother, Lawrence, Amherst; four sisters: Mrs. Mary Krause, Almond, Mrs. Gertrude Kuhrt, Oshkosh; Mrs. Bernice Berto, Amherst and Mrs. Gwendolyn Talik, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; and four grandchildren.

He was also preceded in death by a brother and sister.

Funeral services were held on Tuesday, May 3 at 1:30 p.m. at the St. Mary Magdalene Catholic Church, Waupaca, with Father Orville Catuso, King, officiating.

Burial was in the St. Patrick's Parish Cemetery, Town of Lanark.

Pallbearers were Robert Lyons, Jay DeGodt, William Pomerenke, Donald Kuhrt, John Dondlinger and LeVerne Kienert.

Holly Funeral Home, Waupaca, was in charge of arrangements.


James Peter Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, October 11, 1927. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

James P. Corrigan

Thos. W. Dineen of this city and his sister, Mrs. T. H. Leary of Custer, left here today for Parent, Minn., to attend the funeral on Wednesday of their uncle, James P. Corrigan, who passed away yesterday morning following an illness of nearly a year's duration, aged 73. Mr. Corrigan had owned and operated a large farm near Parent for the past 12 years, moving to that section from the town of Stockton, this county, where he grew to manhood and resided continuously for more than 60 years. He was married at Custer in 1884 to Miss Margaret Dineen and they became the parents of a large family, of whom the following survive: John, Ernest, Ray, Bert, Emmet, Myron, Basil, Genevieve and Frances, who live at or near Parent, and Sister Faith (Mary Corrigan) at St. Cloud, Minn.

The deceased also leaves four sisters, Mrs. William Cauley of Custer, Mrs. Jas. P. Dineen of Amherst Junction, Mrs. Henry Miller and Miss Frances Corrigan at Spokane, Wash. Mrs. J. E. Leary, 227 South Third street, is a sister of the widow. Mrs. Cauley expected to motor to Minnesota today and it is probably that several relatives from Amherst Junction will also drive to Parent.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, October 17, 1927:

Relatives Attend Funeral

Mrs. Rose Cauley of Custer and Mrs. Kate Dineen of Amherst Junction are sisters of the late James P. Corrigan who attended his funeral at Foley, Minn., last Wednesday morning. Other near relatives and close friends of the deceased present at the final rites included Thomas Dineen of this city, Mrs. John Tovey of Fremont, Mrs. T. H. Leary, Mrs. Walter Leary and William Cauley, Jr., of Custer, and Mr. and Mrs. Ben F. Lewis of Albertville, Minn.

Solemn high mass was celebrated at 10 a.m. by Rev. Charles Perigel, pastor of St. Patrick's congregation, Foley, assisted by Father Krel of that village and Father Frank of St. Cloud, Minn. The casket bearers were John Murn, William Barthelmy, W. B. Callahan, Gus J. Parent, Joseph Tracey and W. E. Peschl, all former neighbors of Mr. Corrigan.

He was born at Dixon, Ill., August 9, 1853, and was only a small child when his parents moved to the town of Stockton, this county, where he grew to manhood on the old home farm near Custer and lived there continuously until moving to Minnesota 12 years ago. Mr. Corrigan had been in poor health since 1925.


John Francis Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, November 11, 1942. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

John Corrigan

John Corrigan, age 56, a native of Portage county and a brother of Mrs. Leonard P. O'Keefe of the town of Stockton, died last Saturday at his home at Foley, Benton Co., Minnesota, following a long illness.

Mr. Corrigan, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Corrigan, well known former residents of Portage county, was born in Stockton, He spent his early life at the family homestead farm there and when a young man went to Foley where he since lived. His parents and brothers and sisters later located there.

Surviving are his wife, the former Tillie Abfalter, whom he married at Foley, five children, Jerome, Evelyn, Ralph, Ellen and Edward, all at home, two sisters, Sister M. Faith, the former Miss Mary Corrigan of Montgomery, Minnesota, Miss Frances Corrigan of Foley and Mrs. O'Keefe, and four brothers, Ray, Emmett, Bert and Myron Corrigan, all of the Foley vicinity. Two brothers, Ernest and Basil, besides his parents, preceded him in death.

Funeral services were held Monday morning at Dwulm, Minnesota. Those from this vicinity who attended were Leonard O'Keefe and daughter, Margaret, of Stockton, William Cauley of Custer, Mrs. John Tovey of Fremont, Mrs. N. W. Britz of Stevens Point and Luman Precourt of Stockton.


Leath Russell Corrigan

Reprinted from the Portage County Gazette, January 22, 1916. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

LONG LIFE TERMINATED

Mrs. Leath Corrigan of Buena Vista, Head of Prominent Family, Passes Away

Mrs. Leath Corrigan, widow of James Corrigan and one of the oldest residents of the county, died at the old homestead in Buena Vista at 7 o'clock last Wednesday morning, January 19. Her long and useful life reached its termination as the result of an attack of pneumonia, with which she was taken on the preceding Friday night. Old age and the consequent lack of resistive powers made her illness unusually serious and she steadily declined to the end.

Mrs. Corrigan was 87 years, 11 months and 17 days old at the time of her death. She was born in England, her maiden name being Leath Russell, but was brought to the United States when only about two years of age. She grew to young womanhood at St. Clair, St. Clair Co., Michigan, where she was married at the age of 17 to James Corrigan. Ten years later they arrived in Stevens Point, which was not chartered as a city until three years afterward and was then just beginning to become a center of the great lumbering industry. Mr. Corrigan was engaged in business here for several years, being located at the lower end of Main street, just west of the present site of the Copps Company wholesale grocery house. They moved to Buena Vista in March, 1871, and settled on the farm, which has since been occupied by the family without interruption. Mr. Corrigan died in 1880.

Mrs. Corrigan was a pioneer in every sense of the word, one to whom the cares of rearing a large family were a sacred obligation. The rigors of life in the new country she met with true Christian firmness and fortitude, and as she approached the sunset of her life, her children grown to honorable and useful manhood and womanhood, she continued to manifest those qualities that endeared her to her scores of acquaintances. She was the maternal head of one of the largest families in central Wisconsin, including nine children, 32 grandchildren, 13 great grandchildren and one great great granddaughter, many of whom reside in this immediate vicinity.

The surviving children are: James E., Hamilton, Hamilton Co., Texas; George, Long Beach, Los Angeles Co., Cal.; William and Edward, who have always resided on the farm home in Buena Vista; Mrs. John Gray, Lanark; Mrs. J. R. Means, Mrs. John Ryan and Mrs. T. J. Brown, city, and Mrs. J. P. Hopkins, Ione, Wash. The oldest child, a son, John, died at the age of 23, while a daughter, the oldest among the girls, died when 13 years of age. Three other children passed away in infancy. Of her own immediate family, Mrs. Corrigan was the last surviving member.

The funeral was held Friday morning at 10 o'clock from St. Patrick's Catholic church in Lanark; Rev. M. Hauch officiating. The pall bearers were Mike Loftis, Alf Wanty, Anton and John Wisnac, Jos. Weeds and Wm. Bardon. The obsequies were largely attended by friends and relatives from this city, Amherst and Custer, as well as the surrounding country. Burial was in the parish cemetery.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, January 21, 1916:

LEAVES A BIG FAMILY

Mrs. Leta Corrigan Has Nearly 100 Descendents in County

The funeral of Mrs. Leta Corrigan of the town of Buena Vista was held from St. Patrick's church in the town of Lanark this morning with burial in the parish cemetery. Mrs. Corrigan was the head of one of the largest clans in this part of the state, having nearly 100 relatives in this city and county.

Mrs. Corrigan was born in England eighty-nine years ago and came to this country at the age of eighteen years. She and her husband, James Corrigan, lived in Hamilton, Ontario, for about two years when they moved to Stevens Point. Mr. Corrigan was one of the first men to enter business at what was then known as "Stevens Landing." The family resided here for about eight years and then removed to a farm in Buena Vista where Mrs. Corrigan and two of her sons have resided since the death of her husband which occurred shortly after their removal to the farm.

Mrs. Corrigan is survived by four sons and five daughters. They are Prof. J. E. Corrigan of Hamilton, Hamilton Co., Texas; George H., who is located in California, and Edward and William, who reside with their mother, and Mrs. John Gray of Lanark, Mrs. John Ryan, Mrs. J. R. Means and Mrs. T. J. Brown of this city and Mrs. J. P. Hopkins of Ione, Washington.

Mrs. Corrigan was one of the oldest and most popular residents of this county. She had lived to see the fourth generation of her family.

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Unknown Hamilton County, Texas newspaper:

MOTHER OF J. E. CORRIGAN DEAD

While in Dallas last week on business for his firm, the McKinley-Corrigan Company, Prof. J. E. Corrigan was sorrowfully shocked to receive a telegram from his sister, Mrs. T. J. Brown of Amherst, Wisconsin, bearing the message of the death at the old family home near Stephens Point, Wisconsin, of his beloved mother, Mrs. Leath Russell Corrigan. At the advanced age of 88 years, she passed away on Wednesday, January 19, and was laid to rest in the family burial grounds near her home. The new made grave being beside that of the husband, James Corrigan, who died in 1880.

Mrs. Corrigan was born of English parents in the state of Michigan February 28, 1828, and was reared in the Episcopal church. After her marriage to James Corrigan, an Irishman and a devout Catholic, she embraced that faith, rearing her fourteen children in the Catholic religion. Five daughters and four sons, one of whom is Prof. J. E. Corrigan of Hamilton, survive the aged mother, who to the last, was active in mind, cheerful and companionable.

It is a great consolation and comfort to Prof. Corrigan in this hour of his great sorrow to remember the sweet pleasure of his visit to the dear old mother at her home late last summer. When he bade her good-bye, he felt that it was the last farewell on this earth, and he treasures her every word and expression in parting. Wherever Prof. Corrigan is known, his sorrow will call forth sincere sympathy and he has the comfort of this knowledge to stay him until time, God's blessed healing, brings to him resignation.


Margaret Dineen Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, January 27, 1936, p. 3. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Margaret Corrigan

Mrs. Margaret Corrigan of St. Cloud, Minnesota, a former resident of the town of Stockton and widow of James C. Corrigan, died Saturday, according to word received from St. Cloud by her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Leonard O'Keefe of Stockton.

Mr. and Mrs. O'Keefe and baby left Sunday by car for St. Cloud. Mrs. Corrigan, who lived in Minnesota the past 20 years was a sister of Mrs. John Leary, Strongs avenue. Two brothers, John Dineen of Buena Vista and James Dineen of Amherst Junction preceded her in death.


Mary Hopkins Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, September 10, 1963. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

OBITUARY

Mrs. Mary Corrigan

Mrs. Mary Helen Corrigan, 88, Waupaca, died Monday night at 8 at St. Michael's Hospital where she had been a patient for the past two weeks. She was born in the Town of Lanark Aug. 30, 1875, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Michael Hopkins.

On Sept. 5, 1900, she married George Corrigan at St. Patrick's Catholic Church in the Town of Lanark. They lived on a farm in the Town of Buena Vista after their marriage. Her husband died in November, 1946. She had been residing with a son, James, in Waupaca. Survivors include two sons, James, Waupaca, and Lawrence, Milwaukee; four daughters, Mrs. Walter (Mary) Krause, Buena Vista, Mrs. Robert (Gertrude) Kuhrt and Mrs. Robert (Gwendolyn) Talik, both of Tucson, Ariz.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, September 13, 1963:

Mrs. Corrigan's Funeral

Funeral services were held at St. Patrick's Catholic Church in the Town of Lanark Thursday for Mrs. Mary Corrigan, 88, Waupaca. Mrs. Corrigan, a former resident of Portage County and the widow of George Corrigan, died Monday. The Rev. Alfred Hemmersbach officiated at the services and burial took place in the parish cemetery.

Pallbearers were Richard Corrigan, Mark Corrigan, Edward Helbach, John Helbach, Walter Helbach and James Corrigan Jr. The parish choir sang for the mass, with Mrs. Marie Osborn, Waupaca, the organist. Relatives and friends attended from Tucson, Ariz., Chicago, Detroit, Mich., Kenosha, Milwaukee, Green Bay, Neenah, Appleton, Beaver Dam, Oshkosh, Stevens Point, Plover, Almond and the Amherst area.


Mary Richardson Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, January 12, 1949. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. George Corrigan, Sr.

Mrs. George Corrigan, Sr., 75, Long Beach, Los Angeles Co., Calif., a former Stevens Point resident and stepmother of Mrs. Frank Poust, 932 Clark street, and Mrs. O. E. Carpenter of Almond, died last Saturday morning at Long Beach. A son, Lawrence Corrigan, with whom she had been making her home, informed the local relatives of her death.

Mr. and Mrs. Corrigan lived in Stevens Point in the early 1890's when Mr. Corrigan, a carpenter, was employed in the construction of the main building of Central State Teachers college. Mr. Corrigan died in California six years ago. Mrs. Corrigan was the former Miss Mollie Richardson of Texas.

Surviving besides the two stepchildren are nine children.

Funeral services were held in California.

Reprinted from the Long Beach Press Telegram, Sunday, January 9, 1949, page D-6:

CORRIGAN--Mrs. Mary S. Corrigan, 79, of 85 W. Plymouth Street, a resident of Long Beach since 1911, died Friday night at her home. She was born in Tennessee, and came to this city from Fresno. Surviving are five sons, Lawrence, Emmett, Leonard and Clarence Corrigan, all of Long Beach, and Leo Corrigan of Fresno; four daughters, Mrs. Cecilia Zingg of Chanute, Okla., and Mrs. Agnes Wilhelm, Mrs. Genevieve Dixon and Mrs. Gertrude Porter, all of Long Beach; and three brothers, J. B. Richerson of Shallow Water, Texas; Joseph Richerson of Fort Worth, Texas, and Ernest Richerson of Long Beach. Service will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday in Hunter Chapel, with Rev. Allan S. Pearce officiating. Interment will be in Sunnyside Memorial Park.


Mary Riley Corrigan

 

Reprinted from the Amherst Advocate, Amherst, Portage Co., Wisconsin, Thursday, September 17, 1908. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DEATH OF MRS. CORRIGAN
Passed away at Her Home near Custer Sunday.

Mrs. Mary Corrigan, an aged resident of the town of Stockton, passed away at her home near the Custer station, Sunday morning, after an illness covering a period of several months.

Mrs. Corrigan, whose maiden name was Mary Riley, was born in Ireland in May, 1836. In 1847 with her parents she came to America and settled at Kalamazo [sic] Michigan From there they removed to Illinois where she was married to Patrick Corrigan and in the year 1856 they moved to Wisconsin, settling on the farm near Custer, which has since been their home. Mr. Corrigan passed away in 1901.

They are survived by nine children and two others have preceded them to the grave. Those surviving are James P. Corrigan of Custer, Mrs. Margaret Shea of Bayfield, Mrs. Martin Gleason of California, Mrs. William Cauley, Mrs. James Dineen and Patrick Corrigan of Custer, Mrs. Thomas Padden, of Lanark, Mrs. Henry Miller and Miss Frances Corrigan of Spokane.

The funeral was held from St. Mary's church at Custer, Tuesday morning at 10:30 o'clock, Rev. Father Ulrich officiating, and interment was made in the cemetery adjoining the church.


Patrick Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, November 23, 1901. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Patrick Corrigan

Patrick Corrigan died at his home in the town of Stockton near Custer station, Friday morning after an illness of a year and a half with cancer of the lip.

Mr. Corrigan was one of the pioneer farmers of the town and a man highly respected in his community. He is survived by a widow and several grown children. He was born in Ireland 85 years ago.

The funeral will be held Sunday morning at St. Mary Catholic church at Custer at 9 o'clock, Rev. E. P. Lorrigan officiating.

Reprinted from the Portage County Gazette, Portage Co., Wisconsin, November 27, 1901:

Death of Patrick Corrigan

Patrick Corrigan, one of the pioneer residents of the town of Stockton, died at his home one-half mile east of Custer at half past nine Friday morning, after an illness of over one year with cancer of the lip Mr. Corrigan's suffering during this time was very severe, but he bore up with patience and submission.

The deceased gentleman was born June 1, 1816, in County Mayo, Ireland, and was therefore 85 years old last June; but being possessed with remarkable mental faculties and robust constitution he appeared to be much younger. He sailed from Slaugher Island when he was 30 years of age, June 8, 1846, landing at Quebec Aug. 8th of the same year, where he spent a short time with his brother. From here he went to St. Clair, Canada, remaining but a short time. In 1847 Mr. Corrigan moved to Detroit, where he was engaged in the meat market business, also following the Michigan Central railroad, which was then being built. In the fall of 1848 he moved to Madison, Ind., and remained until the following year. In the spring of 1849 he located at Wheeling, Virginia, remaining but a short time, when he moved 40 miles east, keeping a meat market and did a prosperous business until 1851. The next year was spent at Michigan City, Ind., when he moved to Chicago, then but a struggling station, not containing a single good dwelling.

On the 10th of October, 1852, he was married at La Salle, Ill. to Miss Mary Reilly. They made La Salle and Fulton their home until August, 1856, when the family came to Stevens Point. Mr. Corrigan remained in this town but one winter, when he removed to Custer, having purchased a large farm eight miles east of this city, and has lived there ever since.

Besides his wife, nine children are left, Jas. P., Mrs. Wm. Cauley, Mrs. J. P. Dineen of Custer; Mrs. Dan. Shea and Mrs. M. J. Gleason of Bayfield; P. H., Misses Gretta, Nellie, Frankie A., who reside at home. All were present at the funeral except Mrs. Shea, who was unable to come on account of poor health. The deceased was a very honorable citizen, an excellent neighbor, living husband, kind and affectionate father and a most devoted Christian.

The funeral took place from St. Mary's church, Custer, at 9 o'clock Sunday morning, Rev. E. P. Lorigan officiating, assisted by Missionary Father McCann. Interment was in the parish cemetery. The Rev. pastor spoke some very impressive words on the rarity of a funeral being held on Sunday morning. The pallbearers were John and Pat. O'Keefe, Wm. Leary, Pat. Ryan, Richard Doyle and J. D. McHugh.


Patrick "Ernest" Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, April 6, 1935. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Ernest Corrigan

Ernest Corrigan, Foley, Benton Co., Minnesota, a native of the town of Stockton, died Tuesday morning at a hospital at St. Cloud, Minnesota. He had been in ill health for several years and entered the hospital two weeks ago.

Mr. Corrigan was a son of Mrs. Maggie Corrigan and the late James P. Corrigan, former well known farmer of the town of Stockton. He was born in Stockton 47 years ago. He went to Foley when a young man and was later followed by his parents and brothers and sisters. He was married at Foley about 20 years ago.

Surviving are his wife and five children, Patrick, Eileen, Dan, Mark and Roseann; his mother, Mrs. Maggie Corrigan of Foley; five brothers, John, Bert, Raymond, Emmett and Myron, all residing on farms near Foley, and three sisters, Mrs. Leonard O'Keefe of the town of Stockton, Miss Frances Corrigan at home and Sister Faith, formerly Miss Mary Corrigan, who teaches in Minnesota.

Funeral services were held at Foley Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. O'Keefe were called to Foley last week on account of his serious illness and remained for the funeral.


Patrick H. Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, March 10, 1909, page one. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

STRANGE DISAPPEARANCE

Patrick Corrigan, Who Left Here for Spokane on March 11, Reported to Have Mysteriously Disappeared.


Last week The Gazette contained a letter from Patrick Corrigan, who recently moved from Stockton to Spokane, Wash., where two of his sisters, Mrs. Henry Miller and Miss Frankie Corrigan, have resided during the past few years. Mr. Corrigan left here on the 11th inst., having previously disposed of his farm and personal property, receiving several thousand dollars, and in his letter he told of his trip through North Dakota and Montana and his reception on arriving at Spokane, the future appearing bright to him. After his arrival there, Mr. Corrigan deposited his money, amounting to about $7,000, in one of the banks and now comes the announcement that he has mysteriously disappeared, supposed to have been foully dealt with.  That he will yet show up, alive and well, is hoped for, as he must have had very little if any money on his person at the time of his disappearance, and the securing of cash it would seem, could be the only reason why unprincipled characters would attack him.

Mr. Corrigan is about 40 years old, unmarried, and besides the two sisters mentioned above, has a brother, Jas. Corrigan, who resides at Custer and four sisters, Mrs. James P. Dineen of Custer, Mrs. Thomas Padden, of Buena Vista, Mrs. Martin Gleason of California, and the other at Bayfield."

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, May 29, 1909:

CORRIGAN'S BODY FOUND

Fate of former resident of Stockton Is Partially Solved.


A telegram from Spokane received Wednesday announced the finding of the body of Patrick Corrigan in the Spokane river. The body will be shipped here for interment in the churchyard at St. Mary's, Custer, beside the graves of his parents. It will be remembered that Corrigan, while visiting his sister in Spokane, mysteriously disappeared about two months ago, under circumstances that led to the belief that he had been foully dealt with.

The telegram did not state what condition the body was in or whether the recovery of the body threw any light upon the circumstances of his disappearance.

The deceased was born on the old homestead in Stockton just east of Custer station and was 45 years of age. A few weeks ago he sold the old farm and left on Mar. 11 for Spokane expecting to secure a new location. He disappeared on Mar. 20.

He is survived by one brother and seven sisters, James Corrigan of Custer, Mrs. Margaret Shea of Bayfield, Mrs. Martin Gleason of California, Mrs. Wm. Cauley and Mrs. James P. Dineen of Custer, Mrs. Thomas Padden of Buena Vista, Mrs. Henry Miller and Miss Frankie Corrigan of Spokane.

The following dispatch appeared in the late edition of the Milwaukee Sentinel Thursday. The part relating drafts and mortgages is not true. These were left at his sister's home when he disappeared.

SPOKANE, WASH., May 26.--The body of Patrick Corrigan, a wealthy farmer from Custer, Wis., was dragged from the Spokane river today. His pockets had been turned inside out, his gold watch, gold pin and cash had vanished, as well as $4,000 in drafts and $3,000 in mortgages he carried when he disappeared here on March 13. The body was so badly battered as to be almost unrecognizable. A gash in the head suggested a violent death.

The Stevens Point Gazette, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, June 2, 1909:

THROWN INTO THE RIVER

Mystery Surrounding Disappearance of Patrick Corrigan, at Spokane, Wash., is Cleared

On the 11th of March Patrick Corrigan left here for the west, having previously disposed of his farm and personal property in the town of Stockton. He went direct to Spokane, Wash., where he has two sisters residing. On the 20th of the same month he mysteriously disappeared, no trace of him being found until Tuesday night of last week, when the body was found floating in the Spokane river. The Spokane Daily Chronicle the next day said:
'One more mystery has changed to tragedy. Battered and decayed almost beyond recognition, the body of Patrick Corrigan was dragged from the Spokane river last night a short distance west of Monroe street bridge. Coat, vest and overcoat gone; pockets turned inside out; the gold pin torn from his necktie; his gold watch and fob missing; never a trace of the $4,000 in drafts and $3,000 in mortgages he carried when he vanished nine weeks ago--it hardly needed the ugly gash on the back of his head to suggest what happened to Corrigan.

The body was first seen by three boys who stood on the river bank watching the men who were setting off blasts in the hope of finding the remains of A. W. Duncan and his five-year-old son, drowned at noon yesterday. All that was left of Corrigan was quickly pulled out of the river below the big eddy and taken to Turnbull's under-taking parlors. There the body was positively identified this morning by Corrigan's brother-in-law, Fireman Henry Miller of Station No. 8.

"This is Patrick Corrigan, I am sure," stated Mr. Miller this morning after a careful examination of the body. "The fact that his teeth were bridged makes the identification positive, and besides, I am able to recognize the features. Mr. Corrigan came to visit me on March 13. He went down town Saturday morning, March 20, about 9 o'clock, and the last seen of him was at Pat Healey's store, on Mallon avenue, at 7 o'clock on the evening of that day. He had $4,000 in drafts on his person and $3,000 in mortgages. He also had $40 in cash when he left the house in the morning. He had come to Spokane with the idea of making it his future home."

'Mr. Miller believes the man met with foul play, as there is an ugly gash on the back of his head, as though he had been struck with some sharp instrument. The remains were shipped from Spokane on Wednesday evening and arrived in Stevens Point at 2:55 Saturday afternoon, being met here by Undertaker Mersch and conveyed to the residence of Mrs. Wm. Cauley, a sister of the deceased, near Custer. The funeral was held at 10 o'clock Monday forenoon from St. Mary's church, Rev. Father Ulrich officiating, and was largely attended. The pallbearers were Emmet and Ed. Leary, John Dawson, Tim Welch, Alex Kluck and Felix Lukasevitz. Mr. Corrigan was about 40 years of age, unmarried, and had always lived in Stockton, where he was born. He was quiet, inoffensive, honorable and warm-hearted, ever true to his friends, and that he should meet with so untimely a death is indeed a sad blow to the relatives left to mourn. There are one brother and seven sisters, as follows: James Corrigan, of Custer; Mrs. Martin Gleason, of Oakland, Cal.; Mrs. Margaret Shea, of Bayfield; Mrs. J. P. Dineen and Mrs. Wm. Cauley, of Custer; Mrs. Thos. Padden, of Amherst; Mrs. Henry Miller and Miss Frankie Corrigan of Spokane, Wash.

There were many beautiful floral offerings, some of which were sent from Spokane, including a beautiful bouquet of roses from friends of Miss Frankie at the department store of Jordan & Davis; a bouquet of carnations from the grief stricken sisters, Mrs. Miller and Miss Frankie Corrigan; also a bouquet of orchids and forget-me-nots from Mrs. Shea, of Bayfield, a pillow from Mrs. Padden, of Amherst; a bouquet of carnations from Mrs. Wm. Cauley, apple blossoms from Mrs. Corrigan, violets from Mrs. John Doyle, apple blossoms from Mrs. Anthony Lally and violets from Clara and Birdie Cauley.

After the disappearance of Mr. Corrigan his sisters at Spokane made every possible effort to locate him, employing two detectives to aid the police in their search for the missing man. At first it was thought he had gone to Seattle, and five days were spent in searching that city, while pictures and descriptions were published in different papers. His sisters at Spokane write that he liked the country very much after his arrival there, and they had planned to do everything in their power to make his stay with them as happy as possible. Another means of identifying the body was the fact that just before leaving for the west Mr. Corrigan bought a pair of shoes from Alex Ringness, the shoe dealer, which he wore when he disappeared, and the latter's name was stamped thereon. If anything can be done to bright to justice the one guilty of this foul murder, it will not be neglected. The drafts and mortgages referred to were not on the person of the deceased when he disappeared."

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, June 5, 1909, front page:

FUNERAL OF PATRICK CORRIGAN

Report From Spokane Says Police Are Searching for a Clue to Murderer.


The funeral of Patrick Corrigan, whose body was found in the Spokane river Tuesday evening of last week, was held from St. Mary's church at Custer, Monday morning at 10 o'clock. The funeral was a large one, taxing the capacity of the church. The pallbearers were Alex Kluck, Felix Lukaszevig, Edward and Emmet Leary, John Dawson and Tim Welch.

The identification of the body was made by a crooked finger, a bandage on one arm, which he was wearing as the result of a fracture which happened some time before he left this section, and by his shoes, which bore the name of the "Stevens Point Shoe company."

A dispatch from Spokane under date of May 31, states that the sheriff and police of Spokane are making a determined effort to run down the murderers of the unfortunate man as all the circumstances point undisputably to the theory of murder. The dispatch stated that the body was recovered by chance on May 25 near the Monroe street bridge while the river was being dynamited for the recovery of the body of another man, A. W. Duncan, and his little son, who were drowned that morning. The remains were identified by his brother-in-law, Henry Miller, a fireman at station No. 8. Corrigan's overcoat, coat and vest had been torn off from him, and his trousers pockets were turned inside out, and nothing of value remained upon the body. Robbery was undoubtedly the reason for the murder."

Additional story, same paper, same day:

"The body of Patrick Corrigan came through from the west by express unaccompanied. Owing to the bandages used in the embalming process the body was not viewable, but one hand, bearing a deformed and easily recognizable finger, was left exposed as a certain means of identification for the assurance of the local relatives that it was the right body."

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, July 7, 1909:

Murderer May Be Caught

At the time Patrick Corrigan, the former resident of Stockton, was murdered at Spokane, he carried a gold watch. Mr. Corrigan disappeared on the 20th of March and three days later the watch was put up at a pawn shop, where it was recently found and positively identified by his two sisters, Mrs. Henry Miller and Miss Frankie Corrigan, as well as by Mr. Miller, all of whom reside there, the identification being made certain by the record kept at the jewley (sic) store of Reton Bros. & Co., in this city, of whom the watch was bought by Corrigan before going west, and a copy of which record was furnished by Nels Reton. This may lead to the capture of the murderer or murderers in due time."


Sarah Kirby Corrigan

Reprinted from the Portage County Gazette, June 11, 1884. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Died, in the town of Lanark, Portage county, Saturday night, June 7th, 1884, of pleurisy, Sarah, wife of Geo. Corrigan in the 25th year of her age. Deceased had been sick only about one week, when she was called away by death, leaving a husband [and] three small children, the youngest being born when the mother was taken ill. Mrs. Corrigan had been married about eight years and was a daughter of Thos. Kirby of the same town. She was a loving and dutiful wife, an affectionate and kind mother, a good neighbor and friend, and the husband and relatives will deeply feel and regret her loss. The funeral took place on Monday at 10 o'clock. Mr. Corrigan, while at work in the woods near Phillips, last winter received an accident by which he lost a part of one of his feet, confining him to the house for several months, and which will cause him to be a cripple for life. He certainly needs the sympathy of all.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, June 14, 1884:

Died, in the town of Lanark, Portage county, Saturday night, June 7th, 1884, of pleurisy, Sarah, wife of George Corrigan, in the 25th year of her age. Thus, after only a short illness, another happy home has been bereft of its greatest attraction and a husband and three children left to mourn the loss of a dutiful wife and fond mother. The deceased, who was a daughter of Thomas Kirby of that town, was universally respected and the afflicted have the warmest sympathy of a large circle of friends.


Walter Dickson Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, November 26, 1951. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

PROMINENT STATE LAWYER, WALTER CORRIGAN, DIES

Almond Native Was Champion of Accused, Political Leader

Walter D. Corrigan, 75, a Milwaukee attorney, former Wisconsin political leader and tireless defender of Aaron Burr, died Tuesday at his home near Cedarburg. He had suffered a heart attack Friday and his condition grew more critical Monday when he suffered a stroke.

Native of Almond

He was born in the town of Almond, where he spent his boyhood, and was well-known in this area. He was a frequent visitor in Stevens Point, Almond and Plainfield, maintaining an active interest in this vicinity.

He was born in 1875 on the farm of his maternal grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Dickson, the only child of Helen and James Corrigan. He spent his boyhood at the town of Almond farm, which he purchased in more recent years. Corrigan received his law training at Iowa State college at Ames and at Drake university, Des Moines. He was admitted to the Wisconsin bar in 1897.

He was married to the former Jessie Donaldson of Waupaca and practiced law during the first years of his marriage at Plainfield, where he was in partnership with Buchanan Johnson. Four sons and two daughters were born of this marriage.

Move to Milwaukee

In 1905 the family went to Milwaukee and since then he had practiced there most of the time, except for a two-year interval in 1903-05, when he was assistant attorney general at Madison.

The widely-known attorney was perhaps best known as a defense counsel rather than as a prosecutor.

Champion of Accused

Throughout his long career, he made a good record in both roles, but it was from his work as champion of the accused that he seemed to derive the most satisfaction and in which he exhibited the most zeal.

He specialized in trial and appellate law, his most famous case being the Grace Lusk murder trial at Waukesha in 1918. As special prosecutor, he won a second degree murder verdict.

Active In Politics

Corrigan was also active in politics. in 1934, he was the Progressive party's unsuccessful candidate for congressman from the Sixth district. in later years, he was vocal for the Republican party. In 1948, he backed Gen. Douglas MacArthur for president.

At one time, he was in partnership with August C. Backus, former Milwaukee municipal court judge.

Famous Client Dead

But his most famous client was a dead man - Aaron Burr.

From the time he was 11 years old, Corrigan sought to prove that the charges of treason brought against Burr were lies. The effort involved tremendous research in the Library of Congress and other libraries over the years, plus the delivery of more than 250 lectures on the subject, "A Lawyer's Defense of Aaron Burr."

His thesis was that Burr was discredited by a general in the pay of Spain.

He was preceded in death a number of years ago by his first wife, Jessie, and three sons, Robert M. and Paul, who were buried at Lone Pine cemetery in the town of Almond, near his home farm, and Walter D. Corrigan II, at Fond du Lac. His mother died Nov. 28, 1945, at Cedarburg, where she lived with her son for a short time following a long residence at Almond. He son delivered the sermon at her funeral at Plainfield.

List Survivors

Surviving are his wife, Libby; a son, Thomas of Cedarburg, with whom he had the law firm of Corrigan and Corrigan at Milwaukee; two daughters, Mrs. William J. Iekel, Springfield, N. Y., and Mrs. Anton C. Pegis of Toronto, Ont., and several grandchildren. A grandson, Walter D. Corrigan III, who was raised by his grandfather at Cedarburg; also survives. There are a number of cousins and other relatives in Stevens Point and Almond.

Corrigan was a 32nd degree Mason and a member of the Elks. He was a member of the Milwaukee Co., Ozaukee Co., Wisconsin and American Bar associations.

Funeral Saturday

The body will lie in state after 3 p.m. Friday at the Bannenberg funeral chapel, Cedarburg, and Masonic rites will be held there at 8 p.m. that evening. On Saturday, the body will be taken to the Goult funeral home at Plainfield for services at 2 p.m. and for burial in Lone Pine cemetery. Rev. Granville M. Calhoun of the Plainfield Methodist church will officiate.


Walter John Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, November 4, 1940. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

BUENA VISTA MAN FATALLY INJURED AS CAR OVERTURNS ON HIGHWAY 54

Walter Corrigan, 32, County's 7th Traffic Victim

Portage county's seventh traffic death of the year was on record today with the fatal injury early Sunday of Walter John Corrigan, 32, Buena Vista, who died in a Waupaca hospital after his car overturned on Highway 54 in Lanark.

Sheriff's and county traffic officers who went to the scene of the accident said Corrigan's car, in which he was riding alone, overturned on a straight stretch of road one mile west of the Waupaca county line and overturned twice, coming to rest on its wheels with the back end of the car in the ditch.

Sees Car Overturn

Corrigan suffered severe head injuries and a broken arm, among other injuries. He was taken to Waupaca by Edgar Basford, Lanark. Corrigan, according to Basford, had passed Basford's car as the latter slowed down to turn left on County Trunk D. Both cars had been traveling west on 54. Basford was accompanied by his wife and daughter and, as they turned on the sideroad, Mrs. Basford, looking west on 54, noticed the Corrigan car as it overturned, the county officers reported.

Basford stopped his car and drove to the scene of the accident, 800 feet west of the intersection. He said Corrigan was lying 47 feet west of his car. With the aid of Richard Lamb of Waupaca, who came along in another car, Corrigan was placed in Basford's car and taken to Waupaca.

Skull is Fractured

The attending physician at Waupaca said injuries included a basal skull fracture, lacerated scalp, broken left forearm, cuts on both hands, bruised right hip and a possible fracture of the pelvis. The accident occurred at 1:10 a.m. and Corrigan died at 4:30.

The car, a 1935 Ford sedan, was badly damaged; windows being broken, doors damaged and the top of the car smashed.

Traffic Officer Lawrence Beier, who with Undersheriff John Langbauer, went to the scene of the accident, said marks on the shoulder indicated Corrigan's car traveled along on the shoulder for about 100 feet before it started to roll. It made two complete turns, he said, and came to rest with its front wheels on the blacktop and its rear wheels in the ditch on the south side of the road.

Born in Portage County

Mr. Corrigan was born in the town of Almond on February 9, 1908, a son of Mr. and Mrs. George Corrigan. The family moved to Buena Vista when the son was a child. He had lived at the farm home of his parents all of his life. He was one of the men in the age group who registered recently for national conscription.

Surviving are his parents, two brothers and five sisters, Lawrence of Menasha, James of Waupaca, Mrs. Dan (Theresa) Helbach of Buena Vista, Mrs. Robert (Gertrude) Kuhrt of Almond, Mrs. Elmer (Bernice) Berto of Amherst, Gwendolyn of Sheridan and Mary at home. He is a nephew of Mrs. F. R. Poust, 628 Brawley street, and Patrick Hopkins, Patch street. He was a second cousin of Walter D. Corrigan, a Milwaukee attorney, who is a native of Portage county.

Funeral Wednesday

Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Patrick's Catholic church at Lanark and interment will follow in the parish cemetery. The body is at the Dan Helbach home in Buena Vista.


William Simon Corrigan

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, February 5, 1940. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

OBITUARY

William S. Corrigan

William S. Corrigan, 73, a former resident of Stevens Point and Portage county, died at Marshfield at 3:15 o'clock this morning. He was a brother of Mrs. Thomas Brown, 733 Strongs avenue. Mr. Brown and William F. Ryan, 506 Reserve street, a nephew, had visited him on Sunday.

Mr. Corrigan was born in Stevens Point, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. James Corrigan. When he was two and one-half years old the family located in the town of Lanark, where he resided until going to Marshfield 20 years ago. Mrs. Brown is his only immediate relative.

Funeral arrangements had not been completed this morning.


Thomas Ormsby Currie

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, October 26, 1909. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DEATH OF THOS. O. CURRIE

A short, indefinite paragraph in this morning's Milwaukee Sentinel announces the death of Thomas O. Currie at his home at Stratoy (sic), Ontario. The brief allusion to the fact does not mention the time or cause of death, but simply states that he was taken sick while attending the Toronto fair, and was removed to his home at Stratory (sic), where he died after a short illness.

Mr. Currie had held a position as land commissioner for the Canadian government for nine years.

Reprinted from the Portage County Gazette,October 27, 1909:

T. O. Currie Dead in Canada

The announcement of the death of T. O. Currie, Canadian land commissioner, is learned with regret by that gentleman's many friends in Stevens Point, where he made his headquarters for several years prior to a few years ago, since which time he has been located in Milwaukee. He passed away last week at his old home in Strathroy, province of Ontario, Canada, after a brief illness, and where he had been on a vacation trip. Mr. Currie was 59 years of age and is survived by his wife, one son and a daughter. He was a man of much ability, a brilliant talker and a companionable gentleman, most loyal to the government of King Edward. He was a cousin of Mrs. J. R. Means, of this city, and the Corrigan families of Stockton and Buena Vista."

Reprinted from The Age, Strathroy, Province of Ontario, Canada, October 28, 1909, page 2:

FUNERAL OF T. O. CURRIE ONE OF LARGEST IN ADELAIDE TP

The funeral of the late T. O. Currie took place from the old homestead, 4th line Adelaide township on Thursday last, to Strathroy Cemetery, and was attended by a large concourse of friends. The services at the house were conducted by Rev. C. F. Clarke of Kerwood, and Rev. M. L. Pearson of Strathroy.

A short service was conducted by the Masonic fraternity who attended in a body. The grave was covered with floral offerings from sorrowing friends.

Among those who attended the funeral from a distance were Wm. Murdock, Wm. Spence and Miss Spence, and Mrs. Wm. Dawson, London, and John Callaghan of Milwaukee, personal friends of the deceased.

The bearers were six nephews of the late Mr. Currie, Dr. R. R. Patterson of Coldwater, Michigan; Thos. Patterson of Chatham, John A. Patterson of Collinswood; T. F. Clarke (sic) of London, John and Edward Currie of Strathroy.

Mrs. Currie and family received many expressions of sympathy, among which was a wire from W. J. Whyte, inspector of immigration, Ottawa, expressing profound sympathy and stating that if at all possible he would attend the funeral and represent the department.

As he was leaving town, Mr. Callaghan said: Mr. Currie was a true and person friend of mine and I have travelled over 400 miles to attend his funeral.

He had many warm friends in Milwaukee, who will be extremely sorry to hear of his death.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Weekly Journal, October 30, 1909:

FORMERLY LOCATED HERE

Thos. O. Currie, whose death was briefly mentioned in Tuesday evening's Journal, was at one time located in this city but later was transferred to Milwaukee, where the land office which he conducted is still maintained. He was instrumental in securing thousands of settlers for northwest Canada. He leaves a widow in Stratoy (sic), Ontario; also a son and daughter, both married.

Mr. Currie must have been upwards of 70 years of age, but was a well preserved and active man for one of his years. He was a well read man of keen intellect and was a very interesting conversationalist and public speaker. When here he lived at the Arlington and made many warm friendships among local business and professional men and was always delighted to get a day off to renew old acquaintances around the tables in the Arlington card room.

The name Currie is a contraction for Corrigan, and the deceased was more or less closely related to the Corrigans residing in Portage County.

Reprinted from The Age, Strathroy, Province of Ontario, Canada

Thomas Ormsby Currie -- Immigration agent for dominion of Canada with headquarters in Milwaukee, born 1849 on the spot where he died, 4th line south, 2 miles west of Strathroy. Councilor, Auctioneer known as "Silver tongued orator of Ontario" on same platform as Sir Wilfred Laurier and Chief Justice William Mulock for the Liberal cause. Shareholder in Farmers binder Twine Company of Brantford. 39 years ago he married Mary Ann Evans of St. Marys who survives with one daughter, Mrs. H. E. Dell, Tillsonburg and one son Harold at home. One brother John of Strathroy, Ontario and 2 sisters, Mrs. Jane Patterson, Port Arthur and Mrs. William Dawson, London, Ontario. He was Past Master of Beaver Lodge A. F. and A. M. Buried Strathroy.

Reprinted from The Age, Strathroy, Province of Ontario, Canada, Thursday, October 21, 1909:

T. O. CURRIE DIED AT THE OLD HOMESTEAD

The Well-Known Politician and Speaker Passes Away in Adelaide Township.

Thomas Ormsby Currie, until recently an immigration agent for the Dominion of Canada, with headquarters at Milwaukee, Milwaukee Co., Wis., died at his home near this town at an early hour Tuesday morning, in his 61st year.

Deceased had been broken down in health for some months and early in April had been forced to leave his desk and come home to rest. He returned to his duties however, but the strain was too much for him and he was again forced to give up and return home. After a few weeks' rest he attempted a trip to the West, through Alberta and Province of Saskatchewan in the interests of the government, but was taken violently ill en route and was forced to return, this time completely broken down. It was then known for the first time that his case was serious and alarming symptoms developed.

For the past ten days he had been confined to his bed and was unconscious most of the time. Mr. Currie was born in 1849 on the spot where he died on the 4th line of Adelaide, two miles west of Strathroy. When a young man, he entered municipal life in Adelaide township and for eight years was elected councilor, never once meeting defeat. When the Patrons of Industry were organized, he took a very prominent part, speaking throughout the province, and was a grand trustee of that organization and afterwards elected vice president.

For some years he was a very successful auctioneer, conducting numerous sales throughout the district.

After the Patrons became disorganized he devoted a great deal of his time in the interests of the Liberal government and spoke in many constituencies throughout the Province. He was known as the "silver tongued orator of Ontario" and fought on the same platform for the Liberal cause with Sir Wilfred Laurier and Chief Justice Sir William Mulock. It is said of him that no reporter could ever report him verbatim.

He was a shareholder of the Farmers' Binder Twine Company of Brantford and was elected a member of the board of directors. He was also bailiff for the sixth division court for a number of years, but resigned in 1897, when he was appointed by Sir Wilfred Laurier to the position of Dominion immigration agent for the west with headquarters at Milwaukee, a position he filled most successfully almost up to the time of his death.

Thirty nine years ago he married Mary Ann Evans of St. Mary's, who with one daughter Mrs. H. E. Dell, of Tillsonburg, and one son, Harold, at home, survive him. He also leaves one brother, John, of Strathroy, and two sisters, Mrs. Jane Patterson of Port Arthur, and Mrs. Wm. Dawson of London.

Mr. Currie was a past master of Beaver Lodge, A. F. & A. M., under whose auspices the funeral will be held this Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock for the Strathroy cemetery.

Reprinted from The Milwaukee Sentinel, Milwaukee, Milwaukee Co., Wisconsin, October 26, 1909:

ATTENDS CURRIE FUNERAL

John Callahan of this city was among those who attended the funeral of Thomas O. Currie, Milwaukee representative of the Canadian government. The two were close friends. Mr. Currie's death came suddenly after a brief illness incurred while on his vacation trip visiting the Toronto fair. He was taken to his home in Stratoy (sic), province of Ontario, where his death occurred. He had been government commissioner for the last nine years, and was well known. Before coming here he was Canadian agent at Stevens Point. Mr. Currie's wife resided in Stratoy(sic) and he maintained bachelor apartments at 180 Third street. He leaves a widow, a son, and a daughter. Both the children are married.

Clarence Cychosz

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, October 22, 1960. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Funeral services for Clarence Cychosz, 35, Whiting, will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock at St Bronislava's Catholic Church in Plover.

Mr. Cychosz, a veteran of World War II who was wounded in action four times, died Thursday night October 20, 1960 at 7:55 at an Oshkosh hospital. He had been a patient since Wednesday.

Born in the Town of Sharon on Jan. 23, 1925, he was a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Cychosz. In his youth, he attended the George Washington Public School in Sharon, St. Adalbert's Parochial School in the Town of Alban and St. Stanislaus' Parochial School in Stevens Point.

He served in the Army from March 25, 1943, until his discharge as a staff sergeant on December 21, 1945.  A member of Company I, 80th Infantry Regiment, he saw action in the Rome-Arno, Southern France, Rhineland and Central Europe Campaigns. He was overseas from Jan. 22, 1944, until Oct. 9, 1945.

His decorations included the Purple Heart with three Oak Leaf Clusters and the Croix de Guerre. He returned to Stevens Point after his discharge and was married July 27, 1946, at St. Peter's Catholic Church to the former Theresa Kropidlowski.

They made their home here, and then resided in Waukesha and in California before returning here three years ago. Mr. Cychosz had been a Worzalla Publishing Co., employee and a garage mechanic.

He is survived by his wife; a son, Chester, 13; a daughter, Diane, 8; his mother, Mrs. Vincent (Lillian) Schultz, 119 Madison St., and three brothers, Edward, address unknown, and Clement and Ernest, Chicago. His father and four brothers preceded him in death.

Friends may call at the Dzikoski Funeral Home after Sunday noon, and the rosary will be recited there Sunday night at 8 o’clock. Following the funeral services, burial will take place in St Bronislava's Cemetery.


John Czech

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, March 12, 1932. Contributed by Betty Martz.

John Czech, of Schofield, aged 57, formerly a prominent farmer near Shantytown for many years, died at 8:15 o'clock Thursday night at his home in Schofield. He had been ailing during the past four months and was confined to bed for the last two months.

Mr. Czech was born in the fall of 1874 in Poland and at the age of four came with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Matt Czech, to this country. He was the oldest son in the family. They came directly to Shantytown and Mr. Czech lived on his parents' farm there until his marriage to Johanna Dollman of Bevent when he was 19 years old. The young couple settled on their own farm in that locality and lived there until 16 years ago when thy sold the farm and moved to Schofield. Mr. Czech was employed by the Wausau Paper company at Schofield.

He is survived by his widow and 11 sons and daughters, John, Zigmund, Felix, Theodore, Victor, Barney, Mrs. J. Wojchowski and Mrs. Ted Printz of Wausau, Mrs. J. Boska of Hatley and Alex and Theresa at home. Two children died in infancy. Mr. Czech also leaves his parents, at Shantytown, seven brothers, Charles and Felix of the town of Sharon, Joseph and Leo of the town of Alban, Barney of Shantytown, Walter of Bevent and Michael E. of Milwaukee. Three sisters preceded him in death. Six step-brothers and two step-sisters also survive, Peter Czeck, 1313 East Briggs street, city; Anton Czeck of Chicago, Stanley, Sylvester, Matt. Jr., and Raymond, at home. Mrs. Leo Pepowski of Shantytown and Mrs. Anna Piotrowski of Wausau. There are 17 grandchildren in the family.

Funeral services will be held at 9 o'clock Monday morning at St Michael's church at Wausau and burial will take place in the parish cemetery.


Lawrence Czeh (Czech)

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, October 24, 1900. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Lawrence Czeh died at his home, 608 Union St, at 1:30 last Monday morning, aged about 80 years. The cause of his death was old age, but he was confined to bed only about six weeks. The deceased leaves a wife and three sons, Paul, Matthew and Andrew; and three daughters, Mrs. Mary Tushki, Mrs. Susie Korda, and Mrs. Gusta Kulas, all residents of this city. The funeral took place from St. Peter's church at 9 o'clock this morning, Rev. S. Elbert, of Plover, officiating.

Walter Czech

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, December 22, 1981. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Walter Czech, 87, Route 1, Hatley, a former town of Reid chairman, treasurer and assessor, died Monday at 7 a.m. at his home.

Mr. Czech was born Aug. 12, 1894, in the town of Sharon, son of Mr. and Mrs. Matthew Czech. On Nov 8, 1915, in Rosholt, he was married to Julia Wanta who survives.

Mr. Czech farmed in the Hatley area. He was a member of the St. Ladislaus Men's Society.

Survivors besides his wife include three sons, Father Edmund Czech, Grand Rapids, MI, William, 1206 ½ Third St, Wausau, and James, Stevensville, MI; six daughters, Mrs. Peter Wanta, 6607 Alta Verde St., Mrs. Vilas Sonntag, 3110 Tammarack Lane, and Mrs. Walter Burant, 1903 Hemlock St., all of Schofield, Mrs. Frank Hoffman, Aniwa, Mrs. Ray Mientke, Milwaukee, and Mrs. Ray Szymanski, Menomonie; four half brothers, Stanley and Raymond Check, both of Custer, Sylvester, Stevens Point, and Matthew, Tomahawk; a half sister, Mrs. Ann Dulack, Custer; 36 grandchildren and 31 great-grandchildren.

Services will be held Thursday at 9:15 a.m. at Hayden Funeral Home, Schofield, and at 10 a.m. at St. Ladislaus Catholic Church, Bevent. The Rev. Bernard Nowak will officiate and burial will be in the parish cemetery.

Friends may call from 3 to 9 p.m. Wednesday at the funeral home, where there will be a parish rosary at 3 p.m. Wednesday and a general rosary at 7 p.m. Wednesday.


Adolph T. Czerwinski

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, May 12, 1949. Contributed by Betty Martz.

Former Resident of Alban Killed by Train at Wausau

Adolph T. Czerwinski, 65, Chicago, a former town of Alban resident, was killed at Wausau Friday evening May 6, 1949 at 9 o'clock when he was struck by a Milwaukee road passenger train.

Czerwinski, who had arrived at Wausau Friday evening on the Milwaukee Road's Hiawatha, was awaiting relatives from Rosholt to call for him. He was walking north along the railroad right of way, about 300 feet south of Wausau's Bridge street bridge, when he was hit by the southbound train. Hugo Vo Gnechten, Wausau, fireman on the locomotive, noticed the man walking toward the engine and shouted to Engineer Bloomquist, Merrill, who threw on the emergency brakes, according to a report from Wausau. The train, which was traveling about 25 miles an hour, stopped within 300 feet. Von Gnechten said the man made no effort to get out of the path of the train. The impact tossed him free of the path of the engine. He was dead on arrival at a Wausau hospital. As there was no identification on the man, his identity was not known until Sunday morning, when Wausau relatives discovered the tragedy.

Funeral services will be held in Alban Wednesday morning. A requiem mass will be celebrated at 9 o'clock at St. Adalbert's Catholic church and burial will follow in the parish cemetery. The body is at the Crosby funeral home where the rosary will be said this evening and Tuesday evening at 8 o'clock.

Czerwinski was born on Nov. 1, 1883, in Poland, a son of the late John and Pauline Czerwinski. He came to this country at the age of seven with his parents and lived on a farm in Alban. His marriage to Miss Minnie Zywicki took place in Alban on June 30, 1913. The couple lived at Rosholt until 1929 when they moved to a farm in the town of Franzen, Marathon county. In 1935 they returned to Alban, moving to Chicago in 1943.

Surviving are his wife, 11 children, Edwin, Leo Paul, Peter, Raymond and Martin Czerwinski and Mrs. Henry Zinski of Chicago, Mrs. Martin Yach of Sharon, Mrs. Ernest Piesik of Alban, Miss Marjorie Czerwinski of Wausau and Cpl. Phillip Czerwinski, who is stationed in Georgia with the army, seven grandchildren, four brothers, Walter Czerwinski of Rosholt, Anton of Wausau and Steve and Zigmund of Milwaukee, and three sisters, Mrs. August Klemen of Stevens Point, Mrs. Peter Literski of Hatley and Mrs. Phillip Kizewski of Rosholt. A sister, Mrs. Joseph Kaminski, besides his parents preceded him in death.


Anna Eiden Casperson

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, April 29, 1954. Contributed by Robert Schultz.

Mrs. Anna Casperson

Mrs. Anna Casperson, 69, 624 Water Street, who suffered a heart attack Wednesday, died at about 5:30 that afternoon at St. Michael's Hospital.

She was stricken in Taylor's Drug store, 111 Strongs avenue, at about 1 p.m. and was taken by ambulance to the hospital. Mrs. Casperson had been in ill health for more than two years, but had been active during that time.

She was born in the town New Hope on July 6, 1884, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. John Eiden. After spending her girlhood there, she came to Stevens Point at the age of 14, working here until her marriage in 1906. She was married at St. Stephen's Catholic church to Christ Casperson of Neenah, and the couple made their home here.

Mr. Casperson died in 1918.

Survivors include a son, Stephen Casperson, 624 Water street; a sister, Mrs. Louis Giese, 318 Prairie street; two half-sisters, Mrs. Nick Kabachinski, 320 Francis street, and Mrs. Julia Ebel, 827 Center street, and two half-brothers, Ben Eiden, 1241 Church street, and Adolph Eiden, town of New Hope.

Her husband, parents, a sister and a brother precede her in death.

Mrs. Casperson was a member of the Women of the Moose and the Alter society of St. Stephen's church.

The Funeral services will be held at 9 o'clock Saturday morning at St. Stephen's church, with burial following in Forest cemetery.

Friends may call after 7 o'clock this evening at the Boston funeral home. The rosary will be said at 8 o'clock Friday evening at the funeral home.

The Women of the Moose will conduct their ritual service at the funeral home Friday afternoon a 2 o'clock.


Alice Maher Cawley

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Wednesday, October 16, 1912. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Wm. Cawley

Friends in this city of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Cawley of Wausau, will be sorry to learn of the latter's death, which occurred last Sunday night. Mr. Cawley spent his boyhood and younger manhood days in Stevens Point, moving to Wausau a number of years ago, and Mrs. Cawley had visited here a number of times. The Wausau Pilot gives the following facts:

Mrs. William Cawley died at her home in this city last Sunday night after a long illness. She was operated on for cancer on the 10th day of January, 1910, and it was apparently a success. A year later she again became ill and was taken to West Baden on two occasions, when it was thought she had entirely recovered. Her condition in September made it necessary to seek West Baden for relief. She returned home from Indiana on the 3d of October and from that time was confined to her bed, growing weaker until she passed away at the time above mentioned.

Mrs. Cawley had lived in Wausau ever since she was a child, and was a woman beloved by all who knew her for her noble traits of character. She was born in New Brunswick forty-two years ago. Her maiden name was Alice Jane Maher and she came to this city with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Maher. She leaves to mourn her untimely loss, her husband, William Cawley, and three children, Catherine, Alice and John.

She is also survived by two brothers, Daniel Maher of this city and John Maher of Washington.

The funeral services will take place from St. James' Catholic church Wednesday morning at 9 o'clock, the Rev. Father J. J. Brennan officiating.

Delia Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, July 23, 1948. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Miss Dehlia Clark

Miss Dehlia Clark, 77, of the town of Lanark, died at 12:10 o'clock this morning at St. Michael's hospital. She had been in ill health for two months and was a hospital patient the past four weeks.

Miss Clark was born Oct. 20, 1870, at Racine, daughter of the late Michael and Bridget Clark. She came to Portage county as a child and was graduated from the Stevens Point High school. Miss Clark subsequently located in Chicago, where she operated a restaurant until retiring 20 years ago. Since then she has made her home with a sister, Miss Anna Clark, in Lanark.

She was a former member of the Chicago court of Women's Catholic Order of Foresters.

She is survived by the sister in Lanark, two nieces and five nephews. Four sisters and four brothers, in addition to her parents, preceded her in death.

Funeral services will be held at 9 o'clock Tuesday morning at St. Stephens Catholic church and burial will take place in St. Stephen's cemetery. The body is at the Crosby funeral home where it may be viewed after noon on Sunday. The rosary will be said Monday evening at 8 o'clock at the funeral home.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Tuesday, July 27, 1948:

Funeral of Miss Clark

Funeral services for Miss Dehlia Clark of the town of Lanark, who died last Friday, were held at 9 o'clock this morning at St. Stephen's Catholic church and burial took place in St. Stephen's cemetery, Rev. Francis Disher officiated. The pallbearers were Leonard O'Keefe, William Ryan, Bernard McAuliffe, Michael Clark, George Helbach and Junior Priest.

Persons attending the funeral included Mr. and Mrs. Lonnie Priest, Mr. and Mrs. Archie Clark, Mr. and Mrs. Archie Drake, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Clark, Mrs. Oteman and Leon Clark, all of Mosinee.


Wilhelmina Wilmott Penney Clinton

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, October 3, 1932. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Wilhelmina Clinton

Mrs. Wilhelmina Clinton, age 83, a resident of Amherst since childhood and one of the oldest settlers in the community, died Saturday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock at the home of her daughter, Mrs. George Maxwell, Lower Amherst. She had long been in failing health, had been blind for 12 years and was confined in bed the past five weeks. Her death was caused by general debility.

Mrs. Clinton was born at Buenos Prairie, Illinois, on May 27, 1849, and came to Amherst in a covered wagon with her parents when she was three years old. When the family came through Chicago, it was a small community and she recalled that she often heard them tell of the journey and remark about a large sign there which read, "This way to California."

Her maiden name was Wilhelmina Wilmott and her marriage to the late Asa Penney took place in 1872. She married Henry Clinton in 1893. He is also dead. She is survived by her daughter, Mrs. Maxwell; two brothers, Arthur Wilmott of Amherst and Walter Wilmott of Mattoon, 11 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. Two sons and two daughters preceded her in death. Roy died 29 years ago and Floyd 17 years ago. One daughter died in infancy and another, Irene, Mrs. Elmer Aldrich, died 24 years ago.

Mrs. Clinton was a former member of the Woman's Relief Corps at Amherst.

The funeral will be held at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon at the Maxwell home and burial will take place in the Lower Amherst cemetery.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Friday, October 7, 1932:

Funeral of Mrs. Clinton

The funeral of Mrs. Wilhelmina Clinton, pioneer Amherst woman, was held at the George Maxwell home, Lower Amherst, Wednesday afternoon. Rev. James Blake of Stevens Point officiating and burial took place in the Lower Amherst cemetery. The pallbearers were four grandsons, Malcolm, Neale, Harold and Verne Maxwell.

Mrs. P. W. Worden and Mrs. B. Harvey, accompanied by Mrs. Harold Munchow at the piano, sang "Gathering Home" and "The Old Rugged Cross." Mrs. Alvin Rudiger and Mrs. John Lesczinski had charge of flowers.

Relatives and friends from away were: Mrs. Axel Weiberg, Mr. and Mrs. Malcom Maxwell, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Maxwell and Mr. and Mrs. Merle Shepard, all of Chicago; Mrs. William Strong of Antigo; Miss Merle Wilmott and Donald Wilmott of Mattoon; Elmer Aldrich and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Aldrich of Stevens Point; Mr. and Mrs. Walter Kunde of Oshkosh; Douglas Wilmott of Waupaca; Mr. and Mrs. Leor Mack and son, Morgan, and Mr. and Mrs. Lea Mack, Jr., of Sheridan. The grandchildren from Chicago returned Wednesday night.


Mary O'Keefe Curran

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, June 25, 1937. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Mary Curran

Mrs. Mary Curran, a resident of the town of Stockton most of her life, died Thursday night at 8:35 o'clock at the Portage County Home. She had been in ill health for some time and for the past three months her condition was considered serious.

Born in the town of Stockton on August 26, 1859, Mrs. Curran was a daughter of the late Murtal and Mary O'Keefe. She lived her entire life in Stockton until entering the Home on February 23, 1932. Her marriage to Richard Curran took place in 1880. Mr. Curran died on October 28, 1932.

Surviving are two adopted children, Mrs. Vincent Tracy of the town of Buena Vista and George Curran in Stockton; a sister, Miss Nora O'Keefe, residing at the Tracy home in Buena Vista, and a brother, Michael O'Keefe of Iron Mountain, Michigan.

Funeral services will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Mary's church at Custer and burial will follow in the parish cemetery. The body is at the Prais funeral home where it will remain until the time of the funeral.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Tuesday, June 29, 1937:

Funeral of Mrs. Curran

Funeral services for Mrs. Mary Curran, a former resident of the town of Stockton, who died Thursday night at the Portage County Home, were held Monday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Mary's church at Custer. Rev. Joseph Schaefer officiated and burial followed in the parish cemetery.

The pallbearers were Charles Hamilton, Richard Curran, Richard Doyle, Peter Doyle, Lawrence Lovely and Thomas Nugent.


Richard Curran

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, October 28, 1932. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Richard Curran

Richard Curran, age 85, a Portage county farmer most of his life, died at 6:05 o'clock this morning at the County Home. He had been confined to bed the past two weeks.

Mr. Curran was born in Ireland and when a young man came to Portage county, locating in the town of Hull. His married to Mary Keefe took place 53 years ago. They moved to the town of Stockton about 20 years ago and resided there until this spring when he and his wife moved to the County Home.

Surviving are his widow and three adopted children, Mrs. V. Tracy of the town of Buena Vista, Joseph Curran of Milwaukee and George Curran of Lanark.

Funeral services will be held at 9:30 a.m. Monday at St. Mary's church at Custer. Rev. Joseph Shaefer will officiate and burial will take place in the parish cemetery. The body is at the Prais funeral home where a rosary will be said at 3:30 o'clock Sunday afternoon. The funeral party will leave from the Prais funeral home at 9 o'clock Monday morning.


Edwin L. Carpenter

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, April 14, 1910. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

EDWIN L. CARPENTER

Edwin L. Carpenter, for many years a prominent farmer of the town of Buena Vista, passed away at his farm home on Wednesday, April 6, at the age of 74 years, lacking one day. The deceased was born in Redfield, Oswego county, N. Y. , on April 7, 1836, and at the age of ten years he came to Oshkosh and lived there until 1859, when he moved to the town of Buena Vista, where he lived until his death. He was a soldier in the Civil war enlisting at Plover on Aug. 16, 1862, in Company E, Thirty-second Infantry. While in service at Memphis he was sent to a hospital where he lay for some time and on Feb. 6, 1863, he was discharged for disability and his health has been poorly ever since. He has belonged to the order of Odd Fellows for the past twenty-eight years, and highly respected this order. He leaves a wife and three children, Mrs. G. C. Springer of Keene, Oscar of the town of Almond and Mrs. Frank Reader of Almond, also one sister, Mrs. Olive Scidmore of the Veterans Home.


Mary Adams Carpenter

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, June 21, 1912. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. E. L. Carpenter died at the home of her son-in-law, Garry Springer in Buena Vista, June 14, and was buried Sunday, June 16. She was sixty-two years old and always enjoyed good health until the last illness that closed with death. Her husband, Edwin L. Carpenter, died about two years ago. She is survived by three children, Mrs. Garry Springs and Oscar Carpenter, Buena Vista, and Mrs. Frank Reader of this village. She was universally respected and will be sadly missed by her family and friends.


Sarah Corrigan Carpenter

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, April 20, 1965. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Sarah Carpenter

A member of a pioneer Portage County family and life-long resident here, Mrs. Sarah E. Carpenter, died at 8:15 a.m. today in the Portage County Home. She was 80 years old.

Mrs. Carpenter had been in ill health for the past year and a half, and was cared for at the home during this time. She became seriously ill on Easter Sunday, while she was visiting at the home of a daughter, Mrs. Francis Lebrick of the Town of Plover.

Her funeral will be at 10 a.m. Friday in St. Stephen's Catholic Church. Burial will be made in St. Patrick's Cemetery, Town of Lanark. Friends may call at the Boston Funeral Home after 3:30 p.m. Thursday.

The general rosary will be recited there at 7:30 p.m. Thursday. The Auxiliary to Berens-Scribner Post No. 6, American Legion, will conduct its ritual at 7 p.m. Mrs. Carpenter was a member of the auxiliary.

The former Sarah Corrigan was born June 2, 1884, in the Town of Buena Vista, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. George Corrigan.

She received her education in area schools, and was married to Oscar Carpenter in Stevens Point on Nov. 19, 1902. The couple farmed for many years afterward in Buena Vista, later living in retirement in Almond.

Mr. Carpenter died on Nov. 12, 1950, and his widow lived afterward in Stevens Point at 518 1/2 College Ave., until taking up residence at the Portage County Home.

She was a member of St. Stephen's Church and its Altar Society.

Surviving are four daughters, Mrs. Mary Lebrick, Mrs. Martin (Rowena) Arno, Menasha, Mrs. Francis (Hazel) Fellner, Beaver Dam, and Mrs. Andrew (Marcella) Chesak, Milwaukee; and four sons, Edwin and Reuben, Milwaukee, Leonard, Rockford, Ill. and Hugh, 516 N. Michigan Ave.

She is further survived by 24 grandchildren, 42 great-grandchildren and a great-great-grandchild.

She was preceded in death by two sons and a daughter in infancy; a sister, Mrs. Frank (Theresa) Poust, and a brother, George Corrigan.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Saturday, April 24, 1965:

Carpenter Funeral

The Rev. Joseph Follmar officiated at a requiem mass Friday morning at St. Stephen's Catholic Church for the funeral of Mrs. Sarah E. Carpenter, who died here Tuesday.

Burial followed in St. Patrick's Cemetery at Lanark with Father Follmar officiating at graveside services.

The pallbearers, grandsons of Mrs. Carpenter, were Laural and Garland Lebrick, James Arno, Gerald Chesak, Reed Smith and Danny Fellner.

The funeral was attended by relatives and friends from Milwaukee, Brown Deer, Beaver Dam, Menasha, Neenah, Appleton, Burlington, Wisconsin Rapids, Waupaca, Amherst, Almond, Plover and the Stevens Point area in Wisconsin. There were other relatives from Rockford, Marengo and Eagon, Ill.


Elizabeth Fallon Cassidy

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, January 18, 1923. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. M. Cassidy

Long years of suffering were ended at 7:15 o'clock this morning when Mrs. Elizabeth Cassidy, wife of M. Cassidy, passed away at her home at 315 Strongs avenue. Her death followed only a comparatively few hours after that of her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Fallon, who died at 4 o'clock Tuesday afternoon.

Mrs. Cassidy's death was caused by diabetes, with which she had been a sufferer for several years. She had been able to be up and about up to 10 or 12 days ago, when she was forced to remain in bed, and her end was not unexpected.

She was born in Lee, Mass., on March 17, 1858, and would have been 65 years of age the coming March if she had lived. In about 1870, she came with her parents to Waukesha, where they resided for a few years, leaving there to make their home in Stevens Point, where she had since resided.

Mr. and Mrs. Cassidy were married at St. Stephen's church here May 1, 1883. One daughter, Pauline, besides the husband, survives. Two sisters, Mrs. Edward Brennan of Lee, Mass., and Mrs. Nellie Salwasser of Milwaukee, also remain, and a brother, Ed. Fallon, a resident of Milwaukee.

The funeral will be held Saturday morning at 9 o'clock at St. Stephen's church, Rev. James C. Hogan officiating and burial following in the parish cemetery.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Saturday, January 20, 1923:

Is Laid to Rest

The remains of the late Mrs. M. Cassidy, who died Thursday morning after a several years' suffering with diabetes, were laid at rest in St. Stephen's cemetery this morning. Services were first conducted by Rev. James C. Hogan at St. Stephen's church. The pall bearers were James Welch, A. J. Cunneen, A. D. O'Brien, Alexander Love, John Leahy and A. Gross.


Mary June Cooney

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, March 24, 1923. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Lose Oldest Child

Mr. and Mrs. James Cooney of the town of Lanark mourn the death of their oldest daughter, Mary June, who passed away Wednesday afternoon, aged nine years the 9th of last August. She had been ailing for a year with diabetes. There are three other girls in the family, Nellie, Madeline, and Maxine, aged seven, five and three years respectively.

Little Mary's funeral was held from St. Patrick's church, Lanark, Friday morning at 10 o'clock, Rev. John Gehl officiating. Burial took place in the adjoining cemetery.

Hugo C. Carpenter

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, July 21, 1993. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Hugo Carpenter

Hugo C. Carpenter, 69, Wausau, died Tuesday, July 20, 1993, at Wausau Hospital

Funeral services will be at 10:30 a.m. Friday at the Church of St. Mary, Wausau. The Rev. Fred Kulovits will officiate. Burial will be at 1:45 p.m. Friday at St. Stephen Cemetery, Stevens Point.

Military graveside services will be conducted by the American Legion Post 5, of which he was an honorary lifetime member.

Friends may call from 4 to 8 p.m. Thursday at Peterson Funeral Home, Wausau, and from 9:30 a.m. until the time of services Friday at the church. A parish Vigil service will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at the funeral home.

Mr. Carpenter was born Feb. 18, 1924 in Almond, son of the late Oscar and Sarah (Corrigan) Carpenter.

He received his bachelor's degree in education from the University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point and earned a master's degree in education from Winona State University, Winona, Minn.

He was married to Dolores Heitzinger on Dec. 6, 1944, in Miami. She survives.

The couple moved to Wausau in 1965.

Mr. Carpenter taught at the former Horace Mann Middle School and at G. D. Jones School, Wausau. He was coordinator of the safety patrol program through the Marathon County sheriff's Department.

He volunteered at the North Central Health Care Facilities and was secretary of the Retired Teachers Association.

A veteran of world War II, serving in the U. S. Navy, Mr. Carpenter was a charter member of Voiture 831, 40 et 8 (sic), in which he held several leadership positions.

Survivors besides his wife include two sons, Kenneth (Joan), Stevens Point, and Bruce (Carla), Wausau; two sisters, Hazel Fellner, Tustin, and Marcella (Henry) Muench, Milwaukee; and five grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by one son, three brothers and two sisters.


Oscar Eugene Carpenter

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, November 13, 1950. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Oscar E. Carpenter

Oscar E. Carpenter, 74, village of Almond, died at 3:30 a.m. Sunday at his home. He had been ill for a year.

Funeral services will be held at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Guardian Angel Catholic church at Almond. Rev. Roman J. Papiernik will officiate and burial will be in Lanark cemetery.

The body will be taken today to the family home where friends may call and a rosary will be said this evening at 7:30 o'clock.

Mr. Carpenter was born on June 2, 1876, in the town of Buena Vista, a son of the late Edwin and Mary Carpenter. He lived in the town of Buena Vista until 1936 when he moved to the village of Almond. On Nov. 19, 1902, he was married to Sarah E. Corrigan of the town of Buena Vista. He was a member of the Holy Name societ6y of the Guardian Angel church.

Surviving are his wife; four sons, Edwin, Wisconsin Rapids, Reuben and Leonard, Milwaukee, and Hugo, 1303 Main street, and four daughters, Mrs. Francis Lebrick, Plover, Mrs. Martin Arno, Menasha, Mrs. Francis Fellner, Appleton, and Mrs. Andy Chesak, Milwaukee.

Two brothers and two sisters preceded him in death.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Friday, November 17, 1950:

Carpenter Funeral

Funeral services for Oscar Carpenter, village of Almond, who died Sunday, were held 9:30 a.m. Tuesday at the Holy Guardian Angel church at Almond.

Rev. Roman Papiernik officiated and burial followed in St. Patrick's cemetery in the town of Lanark.

The pallbearers were Walter Collier, Harlow Frost, Fred Kehl, Edward McGarvey, Charles Smith and Max Limke.

The flowerbearers were Sally and Hazel Arno, Joyce and Carol Fellner, Marcia Ann Carpenter and Margaret Lebrick, all granddaughters.

Those from away who attended the funeral were Mr. and Mrs. Clifton Rollins and family, Rockford, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. Reuben Carpenter, Mr. and Mrs. Andy Chesak and family, Leonard Carpenter, Mrs. Ried(sic) Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Seldon McCreedy and Mrs. Joseph Ash, Milwaukee; Mr. and Mrs. Francis Fellner and family and Miss Geraldine Labrotta, Appleton; Mr. and Mrs. Martin Arno and family, Menasha; Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Carpenter and family, Wisconsin Rapids; Mr. and Mrs. James Corrigan, Henry Morgan and Oscar Keenlance, Waupaca.

Mr. and Mrs. N. Thies and Mrs. Patrick Higgins, Amherst Junction; Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Reader, Mr. and Mrs. Walter Springer, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Gates, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Poust, Mrs. L. J. Whitman, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Heitzinger, Mrs. Phalen, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Firkus, Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Carpenter and Kenneth and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Berto, Stevens Point; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Springer, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Hilmer, Mr. and Mrs. Francis Lebrick and family and Dale Tech, Plover; Mr. and Mrs. Dan Helbach and family and Miss Mary Corrigan, Lanark and many other relatives and friends from Stevens Point, Almond and vicinity.


Reuben Thomas Carpenter

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Saturday, June 13, 1992. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Reuben Carpenter

Reuben "Doc" Carpenter, 75, Almond, died this morning, June 13, 1992 at his residence.

Services will be Wednesday at 10 a.m. at Guardian Angel Catholic Church, Almond. The Rev. Leon Powell will officiate and burial will be in St. Patrick Catholic Cemetery, town of Lanark. Friends may call at the church from 4 to 8 p.m. Tuesday. A rosary is scheduled for 7 p.m.

Hardell-Holly Funeral Home, Almond, is in charge of arrangements.

A complete obituary will follow.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Monday, June 15, 1992:

Reuben Carpenter

Reuben "Doc" Carpenter, 75, Almond, died Saturday, June 13, 1992, at home.

Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. Wednesday at the Guardian Angel Catholic Church, Almond. The Rev. Leon Powell will officiate. Burial will be in St. Patrick Catholic Cemetery, town of Lanark.

Friends may call from 4 to 8 p.m. Tuesday at the church. A 7 p.m. rosary is planned at the church.

Hardell-Holly Funeral Home, Almond, is assisting the family with arrangements.

Mr. Carpenter was born March 28, 1917, in the town of Buena Vista, a son of the late Oscar and Sarah (Corrigan) Carpenter.

He was married to the former Winniferd M. Moody on June 22, 1937, in Almond. She survives.

He was a retiree of the city of Milwaukee's municipal equipment division. He was a member of the Retired Milwaukee Municipal Workers Association.

The couple moved to Almond from Milwaukee in April 1979.

Mr. Carpenter was a past member of the Almond Lions Club. He was a member of the Eagles Club, Menasha.

Survivors besides his wife include one brother, Hugo (Delores), Wausau; and two sisters, Hazel (Francis) Fellner, Beaver Dam, and Marcella (Henry) Munech, Milwaukee.

He was preceded in death by two sisters and two brothers.


Grace Glennon Cashin

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, March 2, 1970. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. J. A. Cashin

Mrs. J. A. Cashin, 1929 Plover St., treasurer of the Journal Printing Co. and for many years manager of its commercial printing department, died at 3:45 this morning at St. Michael's Hospital. She was 74.

She had been a patient at the hospital since Jan. 4.

Funeral services will be held Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock at St. Stephen's Catholic Church, with burial later in the parish cemetery.

Friends may call at the Boston Funeral Home after 6 o'clock this evening, and the rosary will be said there tonight at 7:30.

The Journal's commercial printing department at 1124 3rd St. will be closed Tuesday morning from 9:30 to noon for the funeral.

Mrs. Cashin, widow of the late James Albert (Stub) Cashin, was the former Grace G. Glennon. She was born in Stevens Point April 5, 1895, a daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Edward D. Glennon.

Her father was publisher of the Portage County Gazette, a pioneer weekly newspaper which later merged with the Stevens Point Journal to form the present-day Journal Printing Co.

She attended St. Stephen's School and graduated from the Stevens Point High School in 1914.

Her marriage to Mr. Cashin took place at St. Stephen's Church July 11, 1918.

Mrs. Cashin was with the Journal for about 45 years, retiring three years ago. She was a former director of the firm, had served as an officer since 1933 and had been treasurer since 1948.

For many years she had spent summers at the family cottage on Lake Katherine, near Hazelhurst.

Her husband died Aug. 28, 1958.

Surviving are two children, James E. Cashin, 2608 Prais St., and Mrs. Robert L. (Mary Patricia) Berard, 1725 Clark St.; a sister, Mrs. Guy W. Rogers, with whom she lived at 1929 Plover; 14 grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren.


Marguerite Crummey Coleman

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, September 18, 1963. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Thomas J. Coleman

Mrs. Thomas J. Coleman, sister of Mrs. John Halversen, 646 Church St., and the late John F. Crummey of Stevens Point, died Tuesday morning at her home in Wichita, Kan. Funeral services will be held in Wichita Thursday morning.

Mrs. Coleman, the former Marguerite Crummey, was the oldest child in the family of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Crummey, and was married before the family moved from Chicago to Stevens Point, However, she had visited here on many occasions.

Mrs. Coleman's husband preceded her in death. Surviving besides the sister here are six children, John R. Coleman, Rochester, N. Y., Mrs. Douglas Cain, Newton, Kan., and George T. Coleman, Mrs. Phil Ballard, Dr. Thomas Coleman and Mrs. P. J. Jones, all of Wichita.

Besides her parents, husband and the brother, John F., Mrs. Coleman was preceded in death by another brother, George Crummey Jr., who died in 1923 at the age of 37.


Patrick Collins

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Saturday, October 6, 1906. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DEATH OF PATRICK COLLINS

Pioneer Resident and Business Man Passes Away After a Long Illness.

Patrick Collins passed away at his home at 217 Third street at 10:50 Thursday night after a long illness. For nearly a year, Mr. Collins had been in poor health, suffering from rheumatism, but his fatal attack dates from last March when he suffered an attack of grip, followed by Bright's disease. It has been felt for some weeks that the end was not far, but the final dissolution came rather unexpectedly. He was taken with a sinking spell at 2 p.m. Thursday from which he rallied nicely but this was followed by others during the evening which greatly weakened him although he was conscious to the end. During the earlier part of his illness he suffered greatly from rheumatic pains but recently had rested very comfortably. He had been confined to his bed for only two weeks.

The deceased was born on Prince Edward's Island, Canada, on March 7, 1833, being one of a large family. As a young man, he with several of his brothers learned the blacksmith's trade in his father's shop and when a young man came to Wisconsin and at the time of his death was in the 74th year of his age.

The funeral will be held Monday morning at 9 o'clock from St. Stephens's church.


John Fishleigh Crummey

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, December 7, 1955. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

John F. Crummey

John F. Crummey, 66, 410 College avenue, died suddenly at his home Tuesday evening at 7:45.

Mr. Crummey, a retired millwright at the Consolidated Water Power & Paper company, had had a heart condition for the past 10 years. The fire department's resuscitator was placed in use after Mr. Crummey was stricken last night, but efforts to revived him failed. He lived alone at his home and called a neighbor after becoming ill.

Funeral services will be held Friday at 10:15 a.m. at St. Stephen's Catholic church, and burial will take place in the parish cemetery. Friends may call after 7 o'clock this evening at the Rosenow-Moore funeral home, where a general rosary will be said Thursday at 7:30 p.m.

Mr. Crummey was born in Chicago May 10, 1889, a son of the late Mr. and Mrs. George W. Crummey. He attended school in Chicago and then moved to a farm in the town of Carson in 1907.

On Sept. 10, 1913, he was married at St. Stephen's Catholic Church to Evelyn Glennon, and the couple made their home in Stevens Point. Mr. Crummey worked as a carpenter for a year, served as a distributor for the old Wisconsin News, a Milwaukee newspaper, until 1917, and then entered Consolidated's employ.

He worked at the Consolidated Stevens Point division until retiring in May 1954.

Mr. Crummey's wife died July 13, 1961.

He is survived by three daughters, Mrs. Neal Rothman, Wausau, Mrs. Robert Bretzke, Minneapolis, and Mrs. Joseph Negard, Anchorage Alaska; two sons, John Crummey 745 Portage street, and James Crummey, Wausau' 12 grandchildren, and two sisters, Mrs. John Halverson, Chicago, and Mrs. Thomas Colman, Wichita, Kans.

A brother, George, preceded him in death.


Mary Clark Campeion

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Monday, February 15, 1897. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Campeion

A telegram was received in the city today announcing the death of Mrs. Mike Campeion who lived on a farm about a mile from Montello. She was about 55 years of age and her death was the result of a stroke of paralysis with which she was stricken about a week ago. She was a sister of Mike Clark and Mrs. Joseph McHugh of Stockton and Frank and Owen Clark of this city. She also has three other sisters living, Mrs. John Camperion and Mrs. Stephen Vedder of Montello, and Mrs. J. B. Graves of Brownsdale, Minn. Mrs. McHugh had been with her during her illness and Mr. McHugh and Frank Clark went down today to attend the funeral, which will be held at 10 o'clock tomorrow.


Ann Gardiner Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Wednesday, August 3, 1921. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

DEATH ENDS LONG ILLNESS OF LOCAL PIONEER RESIDENT

Mrs. Owen Clark Passes Away After Sickness of Many Years.

Mrs. Owen Clark, pioneer resident of Stevens Point and prominent in educational circles for many years, died at 2:30 o'clock Tuesday morning at her home at 441 Church street.

Her death was the result of creeping paralysis, with which she had been afflicted for many years. She had been confined to her bed from February 4 of this year, and the past eight days had been in a state of coma.

Twelve years ago Mrs. Clark suffered a stroke of paralysis, which eventually led to her death. Since suffering that stroke she had never regained her full health, and very gradually, her condition grew worse. Up to a short time ago Mrs. Clark was interested in the affairs of the day, even though she was confined to her bed.

Funeral Thursday

Funeral services will be conducted at the home on Church street at 10 o'clock Thursday morning by Rev. E. Croft Gear of the Church of the Intercession. Two sons, Byron F. of Minneapolis and Owen W. of St. Paul will be here to attend the funeral. One other son, Rennie J. of Portland, Ore., will be unable to come. Mrs. Clark is survived by these three sons, and Miss Hallie M. Clark, who resides at the family home on Church street.

The life of Mrs. Clark is an interesting story of a woman who was fully aware of the possibilities of life. She was well educated, and full of energy, even in her later years.

Sketch of Life

Ann Eliza Gardiner was born at Evansville, Wis., May 13, 1844, and moved with her parents to Stevens Point when six years of age, making her home in this city continually since then. She was married to Owen Clark at Sheridan, Wis., November 30, 1867.

Mrs. Clark was identified with the organizations that contributed to the uplift of the community. She was a charter member and founder of the Portage County Humane society, organized in 1894, and of the Stevens Point Woman's club, organized in 1895. She belonged to and did faithful service for the Woman's Relief Corps and was a staunch member of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, in which she held local, county and state offices for many years. Mrs. Clark was a member of the Stevens Point Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, and of the Order of the Eastern Star in Minneapolis, Minn. She was a member of the Church of the Intercession here and contributed largely of herself and her means to that church. Mrs. Clark taught school for seven years, commencing this work when but 14 years of age.

Studied Medicine

Late in life, after her children had grown to manhood and womanhood, she took a course in medicine at Chicago, received a diploma and was granted a degree of M. D. Previous to the time she studied medicine she studied osteopathy at Minneapolis, and after completing a course in a school there opened an office and practiced for three years.

Mrs. Clark was also the compiler and publisher of a number of sets of cards to be used as reference cards by students and reading circles and literature classes in the study of Greek history.

Husband Prominent

Owen Clark, her husband was a prominent lumberman of Stevens Point and central Wisconsin. In 1868 he purchased a saw mill in Stevens Point, which he owned and operated until it was destroyed by fire in 1891. Mr. Clark was a leader in local municipal affairs. He served 16 years as a member of the city council and was mayor in 1874, 1888 and 1904. He was a member of the Stevens Point school board for several years and served as a soldier in the Civil war. He died in Stevens Point on October 14, 1915.


Freddy Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Saturday, January 28, 1888. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

CLARK--In this city, January 24th, 1888, Freddy, son of Mrs. J. P. Clark, aged 5 years, 10 months and 29 days. Deceased had been sick with brain and spinal fever four weeks, during the last two of which he was unconscious the most of the time. Mrs. Clark will have the sympathy of all, in this, the second great sorrow that has come to her during the present twelve months.


John P. Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Saturday, February 12, 1887. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

JOHN P. CLARK The death of the above named gentleman occurred at his home on Water street, last Monday forenoon. The event was not unexpected, as he had, as has been previously stated, been in declining health for some weeks. He had been confined to his house since about the first of January, his disease partaking of the nature of quick consumption. At the time of his death he was in the 49th year of his age. He was a native of Oneida county, New York, but came west when quite a young man and settled at Montello. Afterwards removing to Minnesota, he enlisted and served for three years in the 5th Minnesota infantry. Eighteen years ago he came to Stevens Point and assumed the position of foreman for his brother Owen, which position he retained until last season. In April 1877, he was married to Miss Geraldine Bliss. His most worthy wife and five children survive him. His other immediate relatives are six sisters and three brothers. Of the latter Owen and Frank live in this city, Michael and Mrs. Jas. McHugh in Stockton, Mrs. Eliza and Mrs. Mary Campion in Montello and Mrs. Bakens and Mrs. Grove at Brownsdale, Minnesota. Deceased was of a quiet, unobtrusive nature, and had many friends. The funeral, held at St. Stephen's church Wednesday forenoon, was largely attended.


Michael Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Wednesday, September 4, 1918. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

OLD SOLDIER CALLED

Mike Clark, Civil War Veteran and Honorable Citizen, Answers Taps Last Friday

For years and years the annual parade on Decoration Day was certain to include Michael Clark, a soldier who served through practically the whole conflict between 1861 and 1865 and for the succeeding half century was numbered among Portage county's most loyal and true citizens.

Mr. Clark, who reached the venerable age of 84 years on the 8th of August, had been in feeble health for the past two or three years, and passed away last Friday afternoon at 12:40 o'clock at his home, 132 Plover street. During part of the winter and early spring he was in serious condition, but of late felt much better and walked or rode to the business part of town quite frequently. While doing some light work in his garden a week ago Tuesday he was taken with a weak spell and fell to the ground. Willing hands carried him indoors but he failed to rally from this attack and gradually grew weaker until the threads of life were severed.

Mr. Clark was a native of New York, born near Utica on Aug. 8, 1834, but while he was still in his teens the family came west, locating at Montello. Mike, who was of robust constitution, even in his youthful days, early started to make his own way in life and at the age of 16 helped construct the first plank road in the suburbs of Milwaukee. During succeeding years Mr. Clark made his headquarters at Knowlton, devoting the summer months to mill and river work and in the winter was employed at logging.

Shortly after the outbreak of the civil war he enlisted in Co. K, 10th regiment of infantry, and served with valour almost continuously until the victorious army passed in grand review at Washington in July, 1865.

While taking part in the historic battle of Kennesaw Mountain, Mr. Clark was shot through the shoulder and for many weeks thereafter was laid up in a hospital. During the days of convalescence he came home on furlough but when again able to shoulder a musket he returned south to again do his part. The bullet wound was a source of pain and annoyance to him for the past fifty-five years.

On Feb. 13, 1868, he was married to Miss Margaret Nugent, whose father was a farmer and merchant in Buena Vista. Eight children were born to the couple, five of whom died in infancy. Those surviving are Mrs. Geo. Cate of Phoenix, Arizona, Misses Bertha and Cicely Clark of this city. Mrs. Clark died Dec. 2, 1908. Mrs. Cate who has lived in the southwest for eight years, returned here a couple of months ago and Mr. Cate also came north the latter part of last month. As this is their first visit to the old home, their coming here at this time seemed almost providential.

For a period of thirty years the Clark family home was in the town of Stockton, a couple of miles below Arnott station, but they moved to this city in 1904 and occupied the home on Plover street.

Since coming here Mr. Clark lived in retirement, devoting the summer seasons to a well cultivated garden. He was the very essence of honesty in all his dealings and it could be truly said that Mike Clark's word was as good as a government bond. His good and honorable life spent here below merits reward beyond the skies.

Funeral services, conducted by Rev. W. J. Rice, were held at St. Stephen's church at 10 o'clock Monday morning, with interment in the family lot in St. Stephen's cemetery. Old neighbors from the Arnott and Stockton district who served as pallbearers were Geo. D. Clarke, T. J. Leary, D. C. Cate, Chas. Breitenstein, Chas. Leary and J. K. Hanson. Scores of other friends from the country also drove in to pay their last tribute of respect. Relatives who came from a distance included Miss Mary Clark of Manistee, Mich., T. F. Campion and Miss Hallie O'Brien of Montello, Owen Clark of St. Paul.

Besides the three daughters above named the only other member of Mr. Clark's family is one sister, Mrs. J. D. McHugh of this city. The late Frank, John and Owen Clark of this city were brothers of the decedent. It is a strange coincidence that his brother-in-law, Mr. McHugh, died just two years before.


Owen Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, October 14, 1915. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

OWEN CLARK IS DEAD

Civil War Veteran and former Stevens Point Mayor Passes Away

Owen Clark, who took an active part in the earlier social, industrial and political history of Stevens

Point, died at the family home at 3 o'clock this afternoon. Mr. Clark had been suffering from catarrh of the stomach for several years, and although a man of indomitable will and great vitality it was noted by his friends that he was gradually failing. He had been confined to his home for more than two years, and to his bed since last April. The last time he was in the business part of the city was on July 4, 1913, when, as the oldest former mayor of the city, he rode with Mayor Walters at the head of the parade.

From about 10 o'clock Wednesday forenoon until the same hour today Mr. Clark was an intense sufferer; then he gradually sank into that last sleep which knows no awakening.

Owen Clark was born of Irish parentage in Deerfield, Oneida county, New York, February 15, 1840, but had been a resident of Wisconsin since he was nine years old. In 1849 his father's family came to Wisconsin, and a year later settled near Montello, Marquette county. In 1856 Owen went to Knowlton, where he worked in the woods and on the river, later taking charge of a saw mill in Wausau.

In February, 1864, he enlisted in Company C, 3d Wisconsin infantry. He joined the regiment at Fayetteville, Tennessee. He took part in the battles of Buzzard's Roost, Resaca, Kennesaw Mountain and other engagements. He also marched with Sherman to the sea and through the Carolinas to Washington, where he marched in the grand review fifty years ago last May. In all of these marches of more than three thousand miles with his company he never missed a roll-call.

About two years after being mustered out of service Mr. Clark bought a saw mill near where the Jackson mill now stands. This mill he operated, giving employment to a large number of men, until 1891, when it was destroyed by fire.

Politically Mr. Clark was a Democrat and for several years, took an active interest in local politics. He served four terms as mayor and sixteen years as alderman, always with the strictest integrity and with credit to himself and to the public he served.

In 1867 Mr. Clark was united in marriage with Miss Anna E. Gardner, who with their four children survives him. The latter are Raney J. Clark, Portland, Oregon; Owen W. Clark, St. Paul; Byron F. Clark, Minneapolis; and Miss Hallie M., at home.

He is also survived by one brother and two sisters, Michael Clark and Mrs. James McHugh, this city, and Mrs. Margaret Graves, Brownsville, Minnesota.

Mr. Clark was a charter man of Stevens Point Post No. 156, Grand Army of the Republic. He was for seven consecutive years commander of the post and kept an active interest in the organization to the last. He was a thoroughly patriotic, representative and liberal-minded American citizen, not only liberal minded, but liberal in other ways. If, during the many years he was actively engaged in business, a subscription list in any worthy cause did not bear his name it was because it had not been presented to him. Politically, in the days agone, when we both took some part in local politics, we were opposed to him--in his death we mourn the departure of one whom we had counted among our personal friends for forty years.

The funeral will probably be held from St. Stephen's church Saturday forenoon.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Saturday, October 16, 1915:

FUNERAL SERVICES

The funeral of Owen Clark was held from St. Stephen's church, Father W. J. Rice officiating, at 9 o'clock this forenoon, interment following in the parish cemetery. There was a large attendance of friends of the family, among those present being men and women who had known the deceased for more than half a century. There were many beautiful floral offerings and the casket was draped with the flag under which he was born and which, when the government needed the services of her young men, he followed and helped to uphold through five rebellious states.

Those from out of the city who attended the funeral are: Mr. and Mrs. Byron Clark, Minneapolis; Owen Clark, jr., St. Paul; Mrs. John Gardiner, Spencer; John and William Campion, Montello; Miss Campion, Montello; Miss Mary Campion, Grand Rapids; Miss Hallie O'Brien, Montello; Miss Anna Clark, Fond du Lac, and Mrs. E. A. Rose, Plover.

The pallbearers were S. W. Andrews, Ira Barker, J. A. Bremmer, H. O. Halverson, Christopher Krueger and E. McGlachlin.


Bridget Doyle Grooms Coniff

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Wednesday, October 7, 1914. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

A NOBLE LADY CALLED

Mrs. Bridget Coniff, Widow of the Late John Coniff, Passed Away Last Night at Dancy.

Mrs. Bridget Coniff, an old and well known resident of this city and Stockton, died at her home in Dancy, Tuesday evening, Oct. 6th, after an illness of several weeks from complications following an operation for tumor.

The deceased had all her life enjoyed remarkable good health up to the time of the death of her daughter, Mrs. Henry Kronenwetter of Dancy, and on account of the suddenness and sad circumstances attending same, she could never recover from the shock and gradually her vitality gave away. A tumorous growth, which had bothered her for some time, began to assume dangerous proportions and with the courage and strength of mind that had ever dominated her life, she came to this city and entered St. Michael's hospital, where she was operated on May 16th. The operation was entirely successful and in two weeks time she was able to be taken to her home at Dancy, where she continued to improve until complications became apparent that medical aid could not overcome, and the end came peacefully.

Mrs. Coniff, whose maiden name was Bridget Doyle, was born in County Wicklow, Ireland, May 18, 1838. When in her infancy death deprived her of her father, and when 8 years of age her mother, with other members of her family, left Ireland and came to Montreal, Canada, where they resided for some years and then moved to this city. The brothers took up farms in what was called at that time the "school section," but now is known as the towns of Stockton and Sharon. She was the youngest of a family of seven and the last one to survive.

The deceased was married in 1857 to Mark Grooms in Stevens Point, and of this union two children were born, Thomas and William. The former was living with her at the time of her death and William died some years ago at Sidnaw, Mich.

Due to the civil war she was left a widow and in 1846 (sic) she was married to John Coniff. Of this union five children were born, Mrs. G. G. Knoller and Mrs. M. H. Altenburg of Dancy and John Coniff of Fallon, Nevada, and Mrs. J. P. O'Keefe and Mrs. Henry Kronenwetter, who had preceded her to the great beyond. There were also two step-children, Matt Coniff of Bradley and Mrs. Dennis Loughlin of Dorchester, the latter having passed away two years ago.

After her marriage to Mr. Coniff her home was in Stockton for many years, up to the time of Mr. Coniff's death 23 years ago last April, when she sold the old homestead and moved to this city, where she resided for one year until the death of her daughter, Mrs. O'Keefe. She then moved to Dancy, where she resided much of the time since.

Mrs. Coniff was a remarkable woman in many ways. No matter how dark or heavy the clouds were she could always see the silver lining, a personality few people in this life are blessed with, and notwithstanding her advanced age, she kept alive and abreast of the times. Life to her was worth living, for she saw good in everybody and everything. That she was beloved by everybody, old and young alike, was apparent by the numerous inquiries and beautiful flowers that were sent her from far and near during her illness, and which tended to brighten her last days. She was a mother to her family in the fullest sense of the word, and the remaining members mourn her taking away bitterly.

The funeral will be held at Mosinee Friday morning at 10 o'clock from St. Paul's Catholic church, Rev. Father Klein officiating. The pallbearers will be J. J. Heffron of this city, Lawrence Breitenstein and Tom R. Guenther of Knowlton, and M. O'Connor, Carl Kronenwetter and Eugene Wirth of Mosinee.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Saturday, October 10, 1914:

MRS. BRIDGET CONNIFF

Former Town of Stockton Lady Dies at Dancy.

Mrs. Bridget Conniff, formerly for many years a resident of the town of Stockton, this county, widow of John Conniff, passed away at her home at Dancy at 10:15 o'clock Tuesday night. Mrs. Conniff had been in failing health for about a year an d last spring submitted to an operation for cancer at the local hospital. For a time her health seemed much improved, but a change took place and since then there was a steady decline.

The deceased was seventy-six years of age last May 14. She is survived by two daughters and three sons, Mrs. G. G. Knoller, Mrs. M. H. Altenburg and Thomas Grooms of Dancy; John Conniff of Fallon, Nevada, and Mathew Conniff of Tomahawk. Another daughter, Mrs. Henry Kronenwetter, died in the town of Kronenwetter, Marathon county, a year ago last spring.

While Mrs. Conniff had made her home at Dancy for about twenty years, she was a frequent visitor to this city and has many personal friends here who learn of her death with deep regret.

The funeral was held from the Catholic church at Mosinee, Rev. Fr. Klein officiating, at 10 o'clock Friday morning.


Hudson Cooper

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Gazette, Wednesday, August 11, 1886. Contributed by Carol Wood.

DIED: COOPER - At Junction City, Aug. 4th, 1886, of dropsy, Hudson Cooper, aged 54 years, 5 months and 12 days.
The deceased was one of the early residents of this portion of the state, coming to Stevens Point in 1852 from Alleghany, Cattaraugus, N.Y., where he was born. For many years he followed the occupation of running the river and working in the woods, but about twelve years ago left for the west, and resided at Howard Lake, Minn., upon a farm. He returned here last November, and going to Sherry, upon the line of the Central, remained there until May, when he leased the Voyer House at Junction City, where he died. Mr. Cooper had not been in good health for about ten years, and for several months past failed very rapidly. He leaves a wife and two sisters, Mrs. Chauncey Doty, of Sherry, and Mrs. Henry St. Pierre, of the town of Linwood, to mourn his death. The remains were brought to this city last Thursday noon and buried in the Episcopal cemetery, Rev. R.W. Bosworth officiating.


William F. Cooper

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Thursday, January 7, 1937. Contributed by Carol Wood.

William F. Cooper, a lifelong resident of Stevens Point, died this morning at 2:30 o'clock at his home at 347 Water Street. He had been in ill health for more than a year but was not confined to bed until a day before his death.

Mr. Cooper was born in Stevens Point on December 19, 1860, a son of Milo and Sarah Cooper. He attended the Old White school and was a member of its association. He was employed as a teamster for about 30 years for the John Week Lumber company and later drove hack for the Ball livery stable. His marriage to Miss Martha Nelson of Waupaca county took place on November 20, 1883, at Waupaca.

Surviving are his wife, a son, Milo Cooper of Chicago; a granddaughter, Evelyn Cooper of Chicago; a brother, Walter Cooper of Kaukauna, and a half-sister, Mrs. Archie Wolcott of Gardena, California.

Funeral services will be held Saturday at 2 o'clock at the Boston funeral home. Rev. O.E. Rossmaessler will officiate and the body will be placed in the receiving vault. Burial will take place in Forest cemetery in the spring. The body is at the funeral home. Friends are requested by the family to omit flowers.


Helen Morgan Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, August 3, 1928. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. John Clark

Amherst Advocate--Mrs. John Clark passed away at the Neenah hospital Friday, July 27, death coming as the result of heart failure following an operation for gall disease, which she underwent Thursday afternoon. The remains were brought here Friday evening and taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Morgan.

Helen Eunice Morgan was born to Mr. and Mrs. John Morgan, December 15, 1901, at their home in the town of Amherst. She was 26 years old last December.

She attended the local high school and later the Stevens Point Normal and received a teacher's certificate from that institution. She taught one year at Bear Creek.

On March 27, 1919, she was united in marriage to John Clark of Mosinee. As Mr. Clark was employed in the mills at Mosinee the young people went there to reside. From there they went to Brokaw. They spent one year on the Will Drake farm in Lanark, going from there to Neenah where Mr. Clark has been employed in the paper mills.

Deceased is survived by her husband, four children, Donald 6, Charles 4, Keith 2, and a baby girl, Wilma Joyce, who is six months old; her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Morgan and brother, Thomas, in Lanark, and one brother, Allen, who has resided in British Columbia for several years.

Services were held from the Morgan home, Monday, July 30, and interment was made in Lower Amherst cemetery. Rev. James Blake of Stevens Point officiated.

Johanna Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Friday, August 27, 1915. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Johanna Clark Passes Away in Manistique, Michigan

Mrs. Johanna Clark, widow of the late Frank Clark, died at the home of her daughter, Miss Mary Clark, at Manistique, Michigan, Thursday afternoon. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Clark were for many years residents of this city, their last home here being in the residence at 921 Main street, now occupied by J. O. Hill. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Clark sold the residence and about eight years ago went to Manistique, since which time she had lived with the daughter at whose home she died. At the time of her death, which was caused by cancer, she was a little upwards of eighty years of age.

Mrs. Clark is survived by two sons and two daughters, Frank Clark, Mary Clark and Mrs. Glover of Manistique and Dr. Thomas Clark of Milwaukee. She was an own cousin of Sir Thomas Shaughnessy.

The body will be brought here Saturday afternoon for interment by the side of her husband in St. Stephen's cemetery. Funeral services will be held at St. Stephen's church, probably Monday morning.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Saturday, August 28, 1915:

FUNERAL SERVICES

The services for the funeral of Mrs. Johanna Clark were held this afternoon at two o'clock at St. Stephen's Catholic church, Father W. J. Rice officiating. The body was brought from Manistique, Michigan, today, and was taken immediately to the church. Burial took place beside the body of her husband, Frank W. Clark, in St. Stephen's cemetery. The body was accompanied by Frank Clark, a son, and Miss Mary Clark and Mrs. Margaret Grover, (sic) daughters, all of Manistique. Dr. Thomas S. Clark, a son, and Mrs. Mary Sisk, a niece, both of Milwaukee, also attended the funeral. The pallbearers were Michael Cassidy, Charles E. Van Hecke, A. J. Cunneen, W. B. Pett, M. J. Mersch and John W. Glennon.

Mary McDevit Clark

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Wednesday, February 08, 1928. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Mrs. Owen Clark, Jr.

Local friends have received word of the death at St. Paul last Friday of Mrs. Owen Clark, Jr., whose husband was a native of Stevens Point and lived here until he grew to maturity. Mrs. Clark passed away at St. Barnabas' hospital and was buried from St. Columbus church, with interment in Calvary cemetery, St. Paul. She was 40 years of age and is survived by her husband and three children, Halcyon, Owen and Gardiner Clark.

Walter D. Corrigan, Jr.

Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Tuesday, March 1, 1938. Contributed by Jeanne Stanis.

Walter D. Corrigan, Jr.

Walter D. Corrigan, Jr., 37, attorney who practiced at Fond du Lac for the last three years, died at his home at Fond du Lac Monday morning at 11 o'clock following a heart attack.

Mr. Corrigan had been in ill health for several years and was confined at his home but had resumed duties at his office last week.

Mr. Corrigan formerly practiced law in Milwaukee with his father, Walter D. Corrigan, Sr., formerly of the town of Almond, before locating in Fond du Lac. Like his father, he was active in Progressive circles and was the party's candidate for district attorney at the November, 1936, election.

Surviving are the father, of Milwaukee, his widow, formerly Miss Florence Delaney of Milwaukee, a son, Walter D. Corrigan III and a daughter, Lorraine Corrigan.

Arrangements for the funeral were not learned. They were to be completed following the arrival of Mr. Corrigan's father at Fond du Lac from Milwaukee.

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Reprinted from the Stevens Point Daily Journal, Stevens Point, Wisconsin, Wednesday, March 2, 1938:

Funeral for Mr. Corrigan

Funeral services for Walter D. Corrigan, Jr., 37, a member of a former town of Almond family, who died Monday morning at his home at Fond du Lac where he was a practicing attorney will be held Thursday morning at 11 o'clock at Forest Home chapel at Milwaukee with burial in Forest Home cemetery. The body will lie in state at the Geo. M. Degan funeral home at Fond du Lac until 8 o'clock Thursday morning when it will be taken to Milwaukee for the services.