Winnebago County Obituaries





Oshkosh Northwestern - Oshkosh, WI July 6, 1936 Page 4

STROKE OF PARALYSIS RESULTS IN DEATH OF HIGH STREET RESIDENT


Mrs. Elizabeth Carpenter died this morning at 3 o'clock, at her home, 766 High Street, as the result of a stroke of paralysis. Mrs. Carpenter, widow of Louis Carpenter, was born Nov. 11, 1858 in Germany. She came to Oshkosh more than 60 years ago and had resided at the home at which she died since 1891 when she was married to Mr. Carpenter.

She was a member of the Christian Mothers society of St. Mary's Catholic church. Survivors are two daughters, the Misses Dorothy Carpenter and Lucille Carpenter; and one son Louis Carpenter; all of Oshkosh; and a brother, Joseph Sieger, Chicago. Funeral services will be held Wednesday morning at 8:30 o'clock at the home and at 9 o'clock at St. Mary's Catholic church. The Rev. William A. Reul will be the officiating clergyman. Burial will be at the Riverside Cemetery. Friends may call at the home until the time of the services.

Oshkosh Northwestern, Oshkosh Wisconsin - July 8, 1936 Page 4


CARPENTER - Funeral services for Mrs. Elizabeth Carpenter were held this morning at 8:30 o'clock at the home, 766 High Street, and at 9 o'clock at St. Mary's Catholic church. The Rev. William A. Reul officiated. Burial was at Riverside Cemetery. The pallbearers were William Hook, Jacob Boden, Nick Welter, John Joy, Joseph Hanley, and Emil Kaufman.

Contributed by: Jim Carpenter



Oshkosh Northwestern - Oshkosh, WI October 25, 1982 Page 33

Kathro Carpenter


Kathro "Kay" Carpenter, 74, Oshkosh, died Saturday morning in Theda Clark Regional Hospital, Neenah.

She was born Oct, 8, 1908, in Appleton, the daughter of Lothar and Alma Soike Graef. She married Louis Carpenter, April 22, 1935, in Oshkosh. Mrs. Carpenter was a member of First Congregational Church. She participated in the Meals on Wheels program and was a member of the Mercy Medical Center Auxiliary and the Red Cross.

Surviving are her widower; two daughters, Mrs. Larry (Judy) Solarz, Lake City, Minn.; and Dr. Barbara Workman, Muncie, In.; twin brothers, L. Robert Graef, Appleton, and Richard Graef, Fort Collins, Colo, and four grandchildren. Memorial services will be today at 7 p.m. in First Congregational Church, the Rev. Robert Spalding officiating. Inurnment will be in Lake View Memorial Park. A memorial has been established to First Congregational Church.

Contributed by: Jim Carpenter



Oshkosh "Daily Northwestern" August 6, 1926

WAS ILL THREE YEARS


Louis Carpenter Passes Away at Home on High St. - Funeral to be Held Monday Louis Carpenter, who had been in poor health for three years, passed away at his home at 766 High St. Thursday afternoon at 5:45 o'clock. Deceased was born Oct. 9, 1861 at Weyauwega, residing there until he was 19 years of age when he removed to this city where he lived ever since. He is survived by his wife, three daughters, Dorothy, Agnes, and Lucille Carpenter and one son, Louis Carpenter. The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock Monday morning from St. Mary's church, Rev. William H. Ruel presiding. Mr. Carpenter was a member of the Catholic Knights of Wisconsin, branch No. 54 and also the Oshkosh Assembly No. 21, E. F. U.

Contributed by: Jim Carpenter



From the Oshkosh (WI) Northwestern; Dec 10, 1984. Pg 19, Col 2.


Louis Carpenter, 80, Oshkosh, died this morning in Mercy Medical Center. He was born Dec. 4, 1904 in Oshkosh, the son of Louis and Elizabeth Sieger Carpenter. He married Kathro Graef April 22, 1935 in Oshkosh. She died Oct. 22, 1982.

Mr. Carpenter was comptroller for Universal Motors, which became Medalist Industries, for which he was secretary/treasurer. He was a member of St. Peter's Catholic Church and a former member of the Elks and Knights of Columbus.

Surviving are two daughters: Mrs. Larry (Judy) Solarz, Lake City, MN and Mrs. Reginald (Barbara) Workman, Muncie, IN, and four grandchildren. Arrangements are pending at Seefeld Church Avenue Chapel. Contributed by: Jim Carpenter



Oshkosh Northwestern 12/22/1944 pg 4
CHARLES C. COVEY
EXPIRES AT RESIDENCE


Charles C. Covey, 61, of 842 Pearl St., died at the residence early this morning at 1 o'clock. He was born in Marshfield, Wis. March 19 but had lived in Oshkosh most of his life. He was a woodworker and had worked in several local plants including the former Hollister Lumber Company for a number of years. Surviving are the wife, Julia; a son, Lathrop, Oshkosh; two daughters, Mrs. Louis Gurkowski, Berlin, Wis., and Ellen Covey; a seaman second class in the WAVES, stationed at Stillwater, Okla.; a brother, Eugene, Oshkosh; a sister, Lily Covey, Lake Bluff, IL., and five grandchildren. The funeral arrangements will be announced later.

Contributed by: Cindy Scholl



Oshkosh Northwestern Nov. 28, 1933
OSHKOSH WOMAN, 82, PASSES AWAY TODAY AT DAUGHTER'S HOME


Resident of Oshkosh for 42 years, Mrs. Ella (Stevens) Covey passed away this morning about 5:30 o'clock at the age of 85 years. She died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Michael Schneider, 341 Algoma boulevard, after an illness of a month. Mrs. Covey was born July 4, 1848, in New York state. She is survived by two sons, Charles Covey, Berlin, and Eugene Covey, Oshkosh; two daughters, Mrs. Michael Schneider, Oshkosh, and Miss Lillie Covey, Lake Bluff, Ill.; two sisters, Mrs. May Bush, North Dakota, and Mrs. Adda Bailey, Berlin; one brother, William Stevens, Berlin; three grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Her husband preceded her in death 20 years ago. (Elmer H. Covey) Funeral services will be held Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock at the Fiss & Bills funeral home, 60 Chruch street, with burial at Riverside cemetery. Rev. Earl E. Allen will officiate. The body will be at the funeral home from this evening to the time of the services.

Contributed by: Cindy Scholl



Oshkosh Daily Northwestern
16 Feb 1934 P. 12
J. B. Covey Funeral is Largely Attended


Omro, Wis., - (Special) - The funeral of Joseph B. Covey on Thursday afternoon was largely attended. Masons from Oshkosh, Winneconne and Omro were present and a Masonic burial service was given by L. A. Smith, past master of Omro lodge following the sermon by Rev. L. P. Flynn, pastor of the Church of the Open Door, Oshkosh.

Three selections were rendered by Mrs. Flynn and Roy Schelp, accompanied on the piano by Mrs. Elizabeth Stronze of Oshkosh. The bearers were G. H. Stearns; C. X. Fowler; B. V. Gummer; F. W. Stanley; A.L. Bristol and O.V. Mills. There were unusually beautiful floral sprays and pieces.

Relatives from other places who attended included: Mrs. J.C. Hart of Rochester, N.Y.; Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Chronic of Freeport, Ill.; Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Kafer of Eureka and Mr. and Mrs. N.D. Covey of Oshkosh. Others who attended were; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Pugh, Mrs. H. B. Cameron, Earl Atwood and J. Boler of Oshkosh. Seven surviving members of the Arion band, in which Mr. Covey played for many years came to pay their last tribute of friendship to a former associate.

Contributed by: Cindy Scholl



Oshkosh Daily Northwestern
12 Feb 1934 P. 4
Former Oshkosh Man Passes Away at Omro Village
Joseph B. Covey, Member of Old Arion Band for Many Years, Dies – Funeral to Be Thursday


Joseph B. Covey, 73, who was a member of the old Arion band for over a quarter of a century passed away about 2 o’clock this morning. He had lived in Omro for the last five years, and death occurred at his home there.

Mr. Covey played in the Arion band and was a member and manager of the Acme orchestra for many years. His death followed a period of ill health extending over about two years, and serious illness of about five months.

Born in Canada, Nov. 23, 1860, Mr. Covey came to Wisconsin as a boy of about 12 to live at Omro. There he learned the blacksmith trade.

Married At Omro

He was married about 52 years ago to Miss Josephine Schafer of Omro and shortly after his marriage moved to Oshkosh.

He conducted the Aetna Life insurance company agency here until about seven years ago. Mrs. Covey passed away July 4, 1925 and he was married in 1926 to Mrs. Jessie Lowry of Clear Lake, Wis., at Deer Park, Wis. He lived at Clear Lake for two years, and five years ago returned to Omro.

Survivors are the widow, one daughter Mrs. J.C. Hart, and a granddaughter Josephine Hart, both of Rochester, N.Y. There are five nieces and a nephew.

Funeral Services will be held Thursday afternoon at 2 o’clock at the Branson funeral home at Omro, with burial in the Omro Cemetery. Masonic sercices will be held.

Contributed by: Cindy Scholl



Nehemiah Dodd Covey
Oshkosh Northwestern Nov. 8, 1946 p 15


N.D. Covey Dies at Wild Rose Hospital.

Wautoma, Wis.--(Special) N.D. Covey, 74 died at the Wild Rose Hospital at 8 O'clock last evening after an illness of two weeks. He was born in the town of Rushford July 30, 1872, and was a farmer there until he moved to Oshkosh about 20 years ago. He was living at the home of his son in Wautoma when he was taken ill.

Survivors are his wife, one son, Paul H. Covey, Wautoma: two daughters. Mrs Vera Buschke, Detroit Mich., and Mrs. Zula Mouldenhauer, Route 4, Oshkosh; four grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; one sister, Mrs Zula Foster, Mizpah, Minn., and several nieces and nephews. The funeral will be held from the Bronsen funeral home, Omro, at 2 O'clock Sunday afternoon. Friends may call Saturday evening and until the hour of the services on Sunday.

Son of Henry William and Sara Ann (Richards) Covey Contributed by: Cindy Scholl



Leslie Eugene Covey
Oshkosh Northwestern May 14, 1928 pg 16


Funeral services were to be held at the residence today for Leslie Eugene Covey, of the town of Rushford who passed away Friday after a two year illness the last eight weeks of which he had been confined to his bed. Rev. S.R. Dunlop of Weyocena was to officiate and interment was to be in the Shead Island cemetery.

BORN IN RUSHFORD


The decease was born in the town of Rushford in 1868 and had lived on the farm, where he died, since he was 7 years old. In 1899 he was united in marriage to Miss Mabel Della Angle(Augle) of Aurora, Waushara county, Mrs. Covey preceded him in death sixteen years ago.

The surviving family includes a son, Olin Covey; a daughter, Della Fern Covey, and a granddaughter Esther Fern Covey, living on the homestead; two brother, N.D. Covey of Oshkosh; Clifford Covey of Mecosta, Calif; two sisters, Mrs. Zula Foster of Mizpah, Minn. and Mrs. Essie Soules of Chicago. Lynn Covey, a son, passed away thirteen years ago.

Sons of Henry William and Sara Ann (Richards) Covey

Contributed by: Cindy Scholl



OLD CIVIL WAR VETERAN
OMRO, WIS
DIED LAST FRIDAY 28 MAY 1937


MR. FLOYD L. CROSS, A CIVIL WAR VETERAN LONG ACTIVE IN OLD G.A.R. POST, PASSED AWAY FRIDAY EVENING OF LAST WEEK AT 6:30 O'CLOCK AT THE HOME OF HIS DAUGHTER, MRS. ARTHUR KING. DEATH WAS DUE TO INFIRMITIES OF OLD AGE.

MR. CROSS WAS BORN IN OMRO ON THE SITE WHERE THE GERMAN LUTHERAN CHURCH STANDS ON DEC. 12TH 1840. THE SON MR. AND MRS. PHILITUT CROSS. HE WAS MARRIED TO MISS CHARLOTTE ANN CLARK WHO DIED MANY YEARS AGO, AND ON MARCH 20TH, 1889 HE WAS MARRIED AGAIN TO MRS. MINNIE ALLEN, AND SHE PRECEDED HIM IN DEATH, PASSING AWAY IN 1910. HE SPENT MOST OF HIS YEARS IN POYGAN AND EUREKA WHERE THE GIRLS WERE BORN, MOVING TO OMRO IN 1900 WITH HIS DAUGHTER, MRS. AURTHUR KING.

SURVIVING HIM ARE ONE SON HARLOW CROSS OF LAWTON, MICHIGAN. THREEDAUGHTERS, MRS. FLORETTA FINK OF TIGERTON, WIS. MRS. LILIAN LA PORTE OF WAUSAU, WIS. AND MRS MILLIE KING OF OMRO, WIS. 28 GRANDCHILDREN AND A NUMBER OF GREAT GRANDCHILDREN. MR. CROSS SERVED ALL THRU THE CIVIL WAR IN THE WISCONSIN INFANTRY COMPANY 'A' AND 'H'. HE WAS THE SECOND LAST OF THE CIVIL WAR VETERANS OF THIS COMMUNITY, MR. A.B. TICE BEING THE ONLY ONE REMAINING.

A FULL MILITARY FUNERAL WAS CONDUCTED FOR HIM FROM THE PLANSKY FUNERAL HOME ON TUESDAY AFTERNOON AT 2 O'CLOCK, REV. O.P. LOVIK OF WINNECONNE OFFICIATED. THE SERVICE OF THE AMERICAN LEGION WAS UNDER THE DIRECTION OF GORDON MORAN, WHO ACTED AS COMMANDER AND REV. HOMER HOEWING OF WAUKAU AS CHAPLAIN. MRS. LUELLA DARROW AND MISS GRACE CARTER SANG THREE BEAUTIFUL SELECTIONS AND THEY WERE ACCOMPANIED ON THE PIANO BY MRS. OTTO HOGER.

THE AMERICAN LEGION AUXILIARY AND THE WOMEN'S RELIEF CORPS ORGANIZATIONS ATTENDED THE FUNERAL.

INTERMENT WAS MADE IN EUREKA CEMETERY.

COPIED WORD FOR WORD FROM FLOYD LOVE CROSS'S OBITUARY BY HIS GRANSON, RAYMOND C. LA PORTE.MAY 20, 1990

TO ALL WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

KNOW YE, That Floyd Love Cross a Private of Captain Darmin C. Whipple's Company (N) 16th Regiment of Wisconsin Infantry. VOLUNTEERS, who was enrolled on the fifth day of january on thousand eight hundred and sixty four to serve three years of during the war, is hereby DISCHARGE from the service of the United States this twelfth day of July, 1865, Louisville, Kentucky. By reasons of instruction from war department A.G. OFFICE July 12th, 1865.

(No objection to his being re-enlisted is known to exist.) Said Floyd Love Cross was born in Omro, in the state of Wisconsin, and is nineteen years of age. Five feet ten inches high, light complexion, hazel eyes, brown hair, and by occupation, when enrolled, a farmer.

Given at Louisville, Kentucky this twelfth day of July, 1865

Darwin G. Whipple
Capt. Co. "W" 16th Wis. Inf. Vol.

OMRO CIVIL WAR VETERAN CLOSES EXITING LIFE AT 97
Dated August 17, 1937
Floyd R. Cross Gave Early History of OMro Region


The death at Omro recently of Floyd R. Cross, 97 last member of Eureka G.A.R., recalls an inteview he gave 12 years ago in which was recited some of the more interesting episodes of a long and exiting life span.

At 85 years of age Mr. Cross was hale and hearty. At that time he took long walks daily, without the aid of a cane. He disclosed then many incidents in pioneer life in Omro and vicinty that had never before been published. Following is a full account of that interview 12 years ago.

Floyd Love Cross was born December 12, 1840 (By his accounting) he was the 3rd in a family of eleven children. When he was seven, as Mr. Cross remembers-there came to Omro a scotchman, named Keeley, who purchased a corner lot, with the intention of building a hotel. In the street, at the four corners, he dug a well, as the first necessity for a hostelry. The well proved to be an "overflow", and Mr. Keeley, believing this to be an indication of a lake underneath, abandoned the project, and sold the lot to Andrew Lansing. Mr Lansing, not apprehensive of danger went on and built the hotel, called the "Exchange" on the site where the residence of Orin Shufelt now stands. That was in 1850. He also purchased the land to the corner and erected two large barns and conducted a livery business in connection with the hotel.

When a boy in his ninth year, Mr. Cross was engaged to carry mail to Winneconne, six miles distant on foot. Uncle Sam has made some strides in mail service since the day a 9-year old whose playmates were Indian boys, truged twelve miles over dusty roads three times a week-rain of shine.

About this time his father and David Humes were poling a flat boat to Keshena, with merchandise to exchange with the Indians for furs. They were in the employ of Calvin Biglow and the three were the only white men who could talk with the Indians. Also they were the only white men who were allowed in "Indian Land" all the territory north of the Fox River, before the treaty was signed in 1846. Mr. Humes came to Omro in 1847.

Mr. Biglow had a general store and trading post so close to the river bank that it was set on piles. Mr. Cross relates how as a lad of about 10 years old, he assisted Mr. Humes in driving piles for the first railroad bridge across the Fox river at this point. Later Mr. Cross drove the team on a horse tug, towing logs. When the tug proceeded as far as it could it was hitched to a tree or stump on the bank and the raft was pulled up by horse power; in turn the raft was hitched to a tree, while the tug propelled by horse power went on. The same process was then repeated. This was the method used in towing logs up stream, until Mr. Humes invented the "Grouser" or upright boat anchor. This anchor was a great benefit and acted as an impetus to the lumber business. At 11 years of age, the pioneer boy was bound out by his father to a farmer who agreed to send him to school part time. This he did not do nor was the boy allowed to visit his people. After enduring this kind of treatment for four or five years the Cross boy ran away, walking fifty miles to the home of an uncle in Waukesha county. He next hired out to Tom Tustin ( For whom Tustin was named) and worked for him in the North woods, driving logs down the wisconsin river when Wasau and Wisconsin Rapids were only lumber camps.

In 1864 Mr. Cross enlisted in Company "C" of the 16th Wis. Vol. at Berlin, Wis. Mr. Cross changed his middle initial from "N" to "L" so his initials would stand for "Friendship, Love, and Charity." He served until honorable discharged in July 1865. In his early days the main chanel of the Fox river was north of the island, the river being much higher than now, and the float bridge when swung open for boats was also the dock for landing. On one occasion lumbermen who were bring their rafts down the river to be taken over by men from the Oshkosh lumber mills, refused to deliver their logs until they were paid. This resulted in the "Big fight" on the float bridge.

About twenty five of thirty lodgers and boatmen engaged in a lively battle, using poles, picks and "peevies" for weapons. the rivermen won out, and both sides retired nursing sore heads. Mr. Cross was not only a witness but also has a picture of the scrimmage. After the civil war, Mr. Cross made two trips to Superior country for Mr. Biglow, delivering oxen for work in the mines. On one of those trips he and Henry McCall went by team to Keshena, and made the rest of the journey on foot over a military roan, driving the oxen before them through the present sites of Crandon adn Eagle river on their destination, carrying their "grub" on their backs and with the last stop only two miles north of Kenshena.

Mr. Cross made his return trip alone through this wild country, his only weapon a jacknife and he was carrying $460 in his money belt. On reaching Shawano the snow being six inches deep, he purchased a pair of moccassins. discarded his shoes and proceded to walk the seventy five miles to Omro. He reached Mr. Bigelow's store just at closing time, turned over the money and went home exhausted. He was in bed the next day when Mr. Biglow called to pay him, adding $100 bonus, he also sent the doctor. For two subsequent winters Mr. Cross was engaged in logging up in northern Wisconsin for the late Philitus Sawyer. He plied the carpenters trade for years and then his sight failing somewhat he became associated with the late Dr. Loope in fruit growing in Eureka. He had been asked to broadcast over station WJBR, as he ws an entertaining reader. Mr. Cross now resides with his daughter, Mrs. Arthur King at Omro.

On February 8, 1982 Mrs. Eileen Palecek gave this clipping to the Omro Historical Society. the clipping originally belonged to Mrs. Minnie King. Mr. Floyd Love Cross was her father and Mrs. Eileen Palecek's grandfather, and was thus, copied on this computer by Floyd Love Cross's Grandchild from his first marriage. Raymond C. La Porte.

While in the office of the Register of Deeds there is a cetificate showing that Floyd Love Cross age seventy one and Effie j. Cross age sixty were married in this city o December 22, 1913. Justice of the Peace F.A. Kaerver performing the ceremony. the records stated that M. Cross had previously been married and was a widower and that the woman had been previously married twice and was a widow. A letter received by the District Attourney's office from Mrs. Floyd Cross and submitted to the court this morning was dated at Eureka, Wis. February 9, 1915 and reads. "I will not appear against Mr. Cross. I will free him from supporting me. I will go and stay with my children until I am feeling better.. I have been nearly sick for some time and now I must go with my son where I can have care and rest. I am sorry I made the court and expense and if i was able I would gladly pay it back. Mr. Cross has written to me to take the furniture and send him his clothes and some other things, which I am going to do as soon as possible as I must go where I can be cared for.

ALL THIS BECAUSE OF THE FOLLOWING CLIPPING IN THE NEWSPAPER The Daily Northwestern, Monday evening February 1, 1915. Arrested in Tigerton, Wis. Effie J. Cross wife of Floyd Love Cross formerly of Eureka, charged him with desertion and non support. Floyd Love Cross formerly a resident of the village of Eureka ws formily brought into Municipal Court this morning and arraigned on charges of deserting and not suppoting his wife who is the complaintant. Further court proceedings were adjourned until 10 A.M. February 15, and Cross was released on a bond of $500 signed by himself. Cross was arrested by Serriff Williams Saturday evening near Tigerton, Wis. where he was living with his daughter.

When the case of the state against Floyd Love Cross was called in Municipal Court this morning for preliminary examination on a charge of not supporting his wife, there was a curious development. District Attourney D.F. McDonald informed the court that Mrs. Effie J. Cross was not a widow and that she was not divorced from her former husband. Mr Floyd Cross stated that he had married her in Oshkosh on November 22, 1913 and lived with her until January 1, 1915 when he discovered she was still married to a Fond du Lac man named Fred Fieten.

COMMENTS:

WAS A BIG STORY TELLER WHO LIKED TO SPREAD IT A LITTLE THICK. I REMEMBER HIM BUT NOT TOO WELL. HE CAME TO OUR HOME WHEN I WAS FOUR AND WE WENT TO HIS HOME IN OMRO ONCE.

Contributed by: Jean



Sioux Falls Argus Leader 3/13/1924
P.N. CROSS, PIONEER, WAR VETERAN, LEGISLATOR,
METHODIST MINISTER AND HOLINESS WORKER, GOES TO REWARD.


THE FOUNDER OF THE SOUTH DAKOTA HOLINESS ASSOCIATION WHO ATTENDED EACH ANNUAL CAMPSINCE ITS INCEPTION IN 1893. WHO WON HUNDREDS OF CONVERTS TO THE CHRISTIAN FAITH OVER THE STATE IN HIS FORTY YEARS OF MINISTRY, PASSED AWAY IN SIOUX FALLS THIS WEEK AT THE AGE OF 90 YEARS. PIONEER OF DAKOTA TERRITORY, COMING HERE IN 1869. A MEMBER OF THE TERRITORIAL LEGISLATURE. A CIVIL WAR VETERAN WITH A LONG SERVICE RECORD, REV. PHILITUS NOAH CROSS WAS ONE OF THE GRAND OLD MEN OF THE STATE, AND WIDELY KNOWN ESPECIALLY AMONG METHODIST. HE WAS AN ORDAINED MINISTER OF THE METHODIST CHURCH BUT STARTED THE HOLINESS ASSOCIATION 30-YEARS AGO AND HAS HELD NO PASTORATES SINCE THAT TIME.

SURVIVING MR. CROSS BESIDES SEVERAL CHILDREN ARE 54 GRANDCHILDREN, 70 GREAT-GRANDCHILDREN AND SEVERAL GREAT-GREAT GRANDCHILDREN. HE WAS MARRIED THREE TIMES.

BORN IN OHIO PHILETUS NOAH CROSS WAS BORN AUGUST 1, 1833 IN PARKMAN, OHIO WHEN HE WAS SEVEN YEARS OF AGE HIS PARENTS MOVED TO WISCONSIN IN 1840. IN 1854 HE WAS MARRIED TO LYDIA ANN MAXSON, WHO DIED IN 1858. A YEAR LATER HE MARRIED EMMA P. MAXSON. SEVEN CHILDREN WERE BORN TO THEM, CASSIUS, SHERMAN, JOSEPHINE, CEYLON, CLARA, EVA, AND NELLIE. THEIR MOTHER DIED IN 1882 AND MR. CROSS MARRIED MRS. SARAH BLODGETT IN 1887. SHE PASSED AWAY IN 1912. ONE DAUGHTER, MRS. JAMES MURRAY OF HAWARDEN, IOWA SURVIVES BY THE FIRST MARRIAGE.

HE INLISTED IN COMPANY C. 14th, WISCONSIN INFANTRY IN 1861 AND DURINGTHE CIVIL WAR WAS IN THE BATTLE OF SHILO UNDER GENERAL GRANT, THE BATTLE -OF CORINTH UNDER GENERAL BUEL, THE BATTLE AND SEIGE OF VICKSBURG UNDER GRANT AND AT ATLANTA UNDER SHERMAN, AND ALSO IN THE BATTLE OF NASHVILLE UNDER THOMAS, AS WELL AS MANY OTHER SMALLER ENGAGEMENTS. HE WAS DISCHARGED THREE TIMES, FIRST BY REASON OF RE-ENLISTMENT AS A VETERAN, SECOND BY REASON OF PROMOTION TO SECOND LIEUTENANT, AND THIRD AT THE CLOSE OF THE WAR, OCTOBER 10 1865. hE WAS HELD IN SERVICE THE LAST SIX MONTHS BECAUSE OF UNSETTLED CONDITIONS IN THE SOUTH.

PIONEER OF 1869 AFTER THE WAR, HE MOVED FROM WISCONSIN TO DAKOTA TERRITORY BY TEAM IN 1869 AND SETTLED ON A HOMESTEAD NEAR VERMILLION. HE WAS A MEMBER OF THE TERRITORIAL LEGISLATURE IN 1879-1880 AND MOVED TO GAYVILLE IN 1887. LATER HE LIVED IN PIPESTONE, MINNESOTA, FOR SEVERAL YEARS WITH RELATIVES.

IN HIS OWN WORDS, REV. CROSS WROTE OF HIS RELIGIOUS WORK AS FOLLOWS; "CONVERTED TO GOD MARCH 19,1885, AT LODI, SOUTH DAKOTA. RECEIVED THE GIFT OF THE HOLY GHOST AND WHOLLY SANCTIFIED AUGUST 6 FOLLOWING CONVERSION. A FEW DAYS LATER WAS CALLED OF GOD THROUGH A VISION, TO STOP ALL ELSE AND G0 WITH TABERNACLE TELLING THE MESSAGE OF FULL SALVATION FROM ALL SIN BY THE HOLY GHOST THROUGH THE PRECIOUS BLOOD OF JESUS CHRIST THE SON OF GOD. THEN CALLED OF GOD TO PUT IN MOTION THE ORGANIZATION OF THE SOUTH DAKOTA HOLINESS ASSOCIATION JUNE 21,1893. BECAME A CHARTER MEMBER, PERMITTED TO ATTEND EACH ANNUAL CAMP SINCE. HAVE BEEN THROUGH 167 CAMP MEETINGS, WORN OUT FOUR TABERNACLES, ENJOYED THEM ALL AND SURE TO ENJOY THE ETERNAL CAMP ABOVE WITH THE REDEEMED AND BLOOD WASHED IN THE ETERNAL CITY OF GOD."

FOR THE PAST TWO YEARS REVEREND CROSS HAS BEEN LIVING AT THE HOME OF HIS DAUGHTER, MRS. JOSEPHINE SEEKER, 1132 N. DAKOTA AVENUE. LAST DECEMBER HE SUFFERED AN ACCIDENT AND HAS BEEN CONFINED SINCE THEN, RESULTING IN HIS DEATH THE NIGHT OF MARCH 8, 1924. SHORT SERVICES WERE HELD IN SIOUX FALLS AND THE REMAINS TAKEN TO MITCHELL WHERE REV. W. O. BEDFIELD CONDUCTED SERVICES AND BURIAL WAS MADE THERE.
End of article.

Notes from Raymond LaPorte
IT WAS ON THE FARM NOW OWNED BY J.J.McMUNNIGAL, IN BETHEL TOWNSHIP, THAT MR. CROSS HOMESTEADED IN 1869 AND MANY YEARS OF HIS LIFE WERE SPENT IN LODI VICINITY.

PHILETUS NOAH CROSS IS BURIED IN THE HOLINESS CEMETERY AT RIVERSIDE. HANSON TOWNSHIP, HANSON COUNTY. SOUTH DAKOTA.NOW KNOWN AS RIVERSIDE CEMETERY. LOCATED ALONG THE BANKS OF THE JAMES RIVER. 4 MILES EAST OF MITCHELL THE LAND WAS OBTAINED FROM WILLIAM KOCH IN 1907 AND THE CAMPGROUND LAID OUT WITH THE CEMETERY PLOTTED ON THE HILL TOP OVERLOOKING THE AREA ON THE EAST. TIME HAS TAKEN ITS TOLL ON THIS CEMETERY. ON APRIL 16,1978 STONES WERE READ. RECORDS OBTAINED FROM THE WPA CEMETERY RECORDS, FAITH HOME AND COUNTY DEATH RECORDS. GRAVE PLOT No. 14 IS PHILETUS NOAH CROSS.

[Source:ftp://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/sd/biography/doane2/cross-p.tx tj Philetus N. Cross Biography

This biography appears on page 1347 in "History of South Dakota" by Doane Robinson, Vol. 11 (1904) and was scanned, OCRed and edited by Maurice Krueger, mkrueger@iw.net.

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PHILETUS N. CROSS, of Yankton county, was born in Ohio on the I st of August, 1833, and is a son of Philetus Cross, Sr., who was also a native of the Buckeye state. In 1840 the father took his family to Wisconsin, becoming a well known and successful farmer of that state, but he spent his last years in Minnesota where he died at a ripe old age.

The subject of this sketch grew to manhood in Wisconsin. It was in the fall of 1869 that he came to South Dakota and took up one hundred and sixty acres of government land in Clay county, giving his time and attention to the improvement and cultivation of that place until 1883, when he sold out. He passed though all the hardships and trials incident to pioneer life and had his crops destroyed by the grasshoppers three years and by floods at other times. Throughout his active business life he has continued to engage in agricultural pursuits and is today a resident of Gayville, Yankton county. where he now makes his home. In 1860 Mr. Cross was united in marriage to Miss Emma Jane Maxon, by whom he had eight children, and after her death he was again married in December, 1887, his second union being with Mrs. Sarah (Cronk) Blodgett, a native of Ohio. Her former husband was Myron Blodgett, one of the honored early settlers and successful farmers of Yankton county, having come here from Iowa, in the spring of 1869, and taken up government land. He died on the 16th of April, 1883, honored and respected by all who knew him. Besides his widow he left five children, one of whom is now deceased. The others are all married and nicely located.

Politically, Mr. Cross is a Republican with prohibition tendencies, being a strong temperance man, and in early life he took quite an active and prominent part in local politics, efficiently serving as county commissioner in Clay county, South Dakota for a time. He was also a member of the territorial legislature in 1879-80 and was regarded as one of the most influential men of his community. During the dark days of the Civil war Mr. Cross offered his services to the government, enlisting in Company C, Fourteenth Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry, and he was holding the rank of second lieutenant when he received his discharge. He has long been an active worker in the Methodist church, and for the past sixteen years has been an evangelistic minister.

Following are notes written by Florence Stewart concerning Philetus Cross, (Florence's Step-Grandfather) date written is unknown.

Philetus Noah Cross, born in Parkman, Ohio, August 1, 1833, son of Philetus Sweatland Cross and Jane Katherine (Pearl) Cross. Father born in New York State, Nov. 1, 1808. Mother born in 1812. Both father and mother. Scotch-Irish. When a baby his parents moved to New York State. Lived there until 1840 when grandpa was eight years old. Farmed in New York (40 acres) and Wis (160 acres) (preempted claims) settled near Milwaukee when country (was) new (1840). 1850 moved to the nothern part of the homestead claim. Mother died in 1844. Father married next year. When 16 yr. old Grandpa left home and went on Lake Michigan and lake Erie as sailor between Chicago and Buffalo for two years. Then came home. Lived there until 1850. then moved farther north amoung the Indians. 1852. moved back to Ohio where Grandpa went to school at Academy at Farminton, Ohio, one year.

Came back to Wisconsin, Winnebago county, town of Omro. Winnebago Indians live below Sioux city now. Grandpa, now 21 years old, the year he was first married. Indians now moved away. Land occupied by whites. Indians came back every year to get payments. Lydia A. Maxson, born June 26, 1836. Had two children. Both died when babies. 1 & 2. she died in 1856 of Spinal Menningitis. Married her sister Emma J. Maxson, Sept. 1857. (One child, Alice, lived) Cassius, born in June 1861.........................

and grandpa enlisted with Union Army in civil War same month. Omro, Wis. Next March in Camp at Fon du lac, Wis. until March 1862. Then went south and first battle at Shiloh. il 6 and 7. Then in several battles until siege of Vicksburg in June 1863. Siege and battle of Vicksburg. In marches from Shiloh to Vicksburg. Hardship of wet and cold: sometimes without food except what they foraged from country. Siege of Vicksburg-- --

Union army under Grant had to dig his way up to rebel fort and under - - carried powder to destroy - - worked forty days - - then when ready to blow up July 4 morning rebels surrendered. Marched over and divided rations and shook hands with the rebels. Grandpa became ill after surrender adn was sent home on "sick furlough" to Wisconsin ("Camp fever"). After expiration of furlough (60 days), started back to regiment. On the way down the Mississippi River to Vicksburg where the regiment was, his steamer took fire and burned up; about 40 soldiers drowned. He swam about a mile to shore, on the Mississippi State side. Just about the time he thought he could not swim any more he put his feet down and touched a sand bar, so he waded the rest of the way. A steamer came from Vickburg, and took the rest of the soldiers (660) to their regiment. General Grant now strated campaigning through Mississippi to Georgia. They marched all the way righting rebels every day. then came the siege of Atlanta, and surrender on Sept. 1, 1863. Then they marched to Mobile, Alabama. Camped at Montgomery, Ala. a while. There he received a commission as a 2nd Lieutenant. Then he was taken by steamer to Dauphin Island in Mobile Bay. Then to Fort Spanish, near Mobile. (There was a ) battle there; then Mobile was captured. Then they marched to Montgomery, Ala. Then the war closed; he was discharged and sent home.

Dakota Conference - M.E. Church page 107
Listed as member

The following are hand written notes of PN Cross

I was born Augt. 1, 1833.
Enlisted in Co. C. 14 Wis. Vol. Inft. Sept. 8, 1861.
Was in the battle of Shilo, Tenn. Apr. 7, 1862.
In the battle of Puka?, Tenn. Sept. 17th 1862
In the battle of Corinth, Tenn. Oct. 3, 1862
In the battle of Trisconnbia?, Heachie, Telehatchie, and Waterford, Tenn 1862.
In the assault and siege and capture of Vicksburg, from May 22nd to July 4th, 1863
Re-enlisted Dec. 11, 1863
Was in the Sherman campaign, and in the assault and siege and capture of Atlanta, GA. June, July, Augt. and Sept. 1864.
Was in the battle ot Columbia and Nashville, Tenn. Dec. 1864
Was made corporal in 1862. Promoted to Sargent Jan. 1st 186?
Promoted to Lieut. Feb. 28th 1865. Discharged Oct. 7th, 186?
Came to Dakota Oct. 30, 1869.
Was converted to God March 19, 1885.
Received the Baptism with the holy ghost Augt. 6th, 1885.
Thou there on endure hardship as a good soldier of our Christ. II ? 2 3.
In ? ?. Philetus N. Crofs
Gayville, S. Dakota

Contributed by: Jean



CROWE, Nathan Wier, 211 Mt. Vernon street. Services 2 p.m. today, Fiss & Bills funeral home, the Rev. H. H. Hoessel. Riverside. Vocal selections, Richard Burr. Pallbearers: Carl Stieg, Richard Barrett, Lester Cooper, Alfred Last, Clinton Luhm and Joseph Kaminski.

ODN - July 22, 1948 - page 4

Submitted by: Michelle Ross



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