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Cabell Creek Community

             HISTORY OF CABELL CREEK COMMUNITY
 Written for Farm Bureau Country Life Conference by Mrs. Walter Mitchell
                                June 1925.
 
Physical Features
Cabell Creek Community lies between the waters of Bryant Creek on the
north, Lower Creek on the east, Mud River on the south, Little Cabell and 
Seven Mile on the west. Cabell Creek rises between the waters of Bryant on 
the north and Lower Creek on the east. It flows in a south westerly 
direction until it reaches Rush Fork, then south, and empties into Mud 
River near Howell's Mill. 
 
The principal tributaries of Big Cabell are as follows: Mud Lick, Jard 
Camp, Beelo Branch, Rush Fork, Cow Hollow, and Dennison Branch. 
 
Mud Lick, which flows through the Chas. Webb, Everett Venoy. Chas. Yoho, 
Walter Mitchell, and L. T. Arthur farms, was so named for the noted deer 
lick spring on the Mitchell farm, to which deer came from miles away. This 
spring has never been known to go dry. It is now piped to the Mitchell 
residence. 
 
Jard Camp Creek, better known by the younger generation as Gibson Branch, 
received its name from the fact that an old man by the name of Jard, years 
ago camped under a large rock along this creek not far from the Grandma 
Gibson residence. 
 
Beelo Branch, was named for a family who settled here about the year 1868, 
near where Henry Jordan now lives. 
 
Rush Branch, which flows from t he Jarvis, Petit, Simpson, Jackson and 
Nowlin Community was named for the large rushes which grew along its 
banks. These rushes are not as numerous nor so large as in early history 
due to more extensive cultivation. 
 
Cow Hollow", on the Billy Adams farm, was so named on account of its being 
noted as a favorite stamping ground for cattle which roamed at large in 
the early history of this community. Getting in the cows in those days was 
no little task. 
 
Dennison Branch, which lies between the Thompson and Roberts farm of 
today, was named for an early settler John Dennison. Along this branch 
stands the only mountain birch known in this community. 

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