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Barboursville High School

Barboursville High School - A Look Back to 1924

(Submitted by Keith Kearns)

In 1924 the late Chester Fannin became Principal of Barboursville Elementary School and immediately began to plan and dream of better schools for Barboursville and sold the idea to the community.

During the school year 1925-1926, a junior high school was established in the Barboursville Elementary building and Barboursville High School was established in what is now the "B" building of the former junior high, taking over the Academy from Morris Harvey College.

In September 1928 the school was moved to the Old Billings Hall, a dormitory that had been purchased by the Barboursville Joint District Board of Education. In 1929 a cornerstone with inscription "Barboursville Joint High School" was laid at the northwest corner of an eight room unit built in front of Billingsly Hall. The word "joint" referred to the union of Barboursville town and Barboursville district for high school purposes. Mr. Fannin served as principal until 1937.

Later in the days of the Works Progress Administration, annexes were constructed on both sides of the building, giving the school twelve classrooms. In 1938-1939, again with WPA assistance, the old dormitory practically disappeared and an auditorium, gymnasium, library, home economics room, shop, offices, and dressing rooms appeared in it's place.

In 1949, enrollment pressure again demanded expansion and the Federal Feeding Program required additional room. A cafeteria and kitchen were added. This idea is credited to Mr. Fannin. Many of the school's dances and social events were held here.

In 1952, four rooms were added above the cafeteria for the science department. Five years later, two restrooms and three classrooms were added at the south end of the main building. The following year, four classrooms were constructed above the 1957 addition.

In 1963 the northwest wing was completed, consisting of five single classrooms, one double classroom, and two restrooms. The double classroom and one single classroom were equipped with electrical outlets in the floor to give the school a better facility for the commercial department.

In the summer of 1965, two section-type classrooms were constructed on the east side of the building. In December of 1965, the bus garage was converted into a girl's gym. Additions that summer of 1966 included two section-type classrooms, band and music rooms, and public restrooms for football and baseball games.

In 1967 the wood shop was converted into three classrooms when a new shop was constructed on the eastern side of the campus. The following summer, two more classrooms were constructed. One housed the art department. In the summer of 1969, two more section-type classrooms were formed from the old library and its storage room and office. During the term of 1972-73, the shop classes constructed a classroom adjoining the shop so that there would be more floor space for machinery. A classroom for drug education was completed by utilizing what had been a storage garage during the summer of 1973.

Twelve new classroom were added to Barboursville High School during the 1976-1977 school year. A new gymnasium was also added, with seating capacity of 2,800. Obviously, there have been many changes over the years. From the first class of 26 members in 1928 to the final class of 1994, these walls have seen it all. And now, as the latest change occurs with consolidating into the new Cabell Midland High School, join us as we take one more long look back at Barboursville High School.

Graduating Class of 1928: Barboursville High School. Ida Browning, Lettie Browning, Lola Bryan, Art Burgess, Emerson Burgess, Lillian Cecil, Margaret Constance, Donald Dillon, Louise France, Sylvia Gothard, Dixie Hatfield, Herald Luster, Lola Martin, Robert Miller, Mary Lee Mitchell, Beatrice Murray, Eliza Musgrave, Lora Neal, Frank Plybon, Paul Rayburn, Thomas Stout, Harley Stewart, Alice Stallings, Walter Staples, Ester Waugh, Virginia Waugh.

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