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Morgan County, West Virginia

Communities


         Listed here are some of the communities that exist or have existed within the present-day boundaries of Morgan County.

         Most of these communities remain today, some with their own elected officials, fire departments, and postal zip codes; others are outskirts of the county seat, Berkeley Springs, and other towns. Still others are but a memory for the older residents of Morgan County or the birth and final resting place for our ancestors. Over the years, a few of these communities have been referred to by different names, some a variant spelling of what we know today; others were quite different.

         The United States Geological Survey offers topographical and aerial maps, as well as general area maps at its website. To use the USGS Query, insert the town or community name under Feature Name, enter the state, and use the pull-down menu for feature type. You can also request the county by clicking on the county name once, then accessing the pull-down menu (note: the county menu isn't available until after you've entered the state and clicked once on the county). You can locate everything from airports to woods through the USGS Query Form, including cemeteries, mines, reservoirs, and wells. I have included links to maps offered through USGS, Wikipedia, and other websites. Tools are available with each map to zoom into the specified area.

         Historical post offices are being included because many old documents listed where many of our ancestors received their mail rather than the community in which they lived. Often this is because their homes were in such rural areas, they weren't part of an established community.

         Sources of the following information include the USGS, U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. Postal Service, Place Names in West Virginia (West Virginia Archives and History), Wikipedia, HomeTownLocator, and other online sources. Some dates of establishment vary from source to source; alternate dates have been included.


    • Alpine Depot (1851-1911) — an historical post office located 6 miles northeast of Berkeley Springs, operated between 1850-1875. Perhaps the store or community building was in existence from 1851-1911, but the post office was only operated for the 25-year span found at the USGS site. See Hancock, listed here.

    • Bechtol (Est. 1935)

    • Berkeley Springs (Bath) — Est. mid-1700's; officially chartered Bath, Morgan County, West Virginia, in 1776, in honor of England's spa city of Bath. While vacationing in the area in 1767, George Washington made note of how busy the town had become, including the establishment of a summer home built there by Lord Fairfax. The "private baths" in the community made the area a popular destination for Virginia's social elite. In honor of these two men, the town's main north-south street was named Washington and the main east-west street was named Fairfax. Bath later became known as Berkeley Springs, primarily because the town's post office took that name (combining Governor Norborne Berkeley's last name with the warm springs found there) to avoid confusion with another post office that was already called Bath, located in southeastern Virginia. Because mail was sent to and from Berkeley Springs, that name slowly took precedence. Bath's population increased during and immediately after the American Revolutionary War as wounded soldiers and others came to the area believing that the warm springs had medicinal qualities. Bath gained a reputation as a somewhat wild town where eating, drinking, dancing, and gambling on the daily horse races were the order of the day. Visit the official website of Berkeley Springs. See this or this map to learn the location of Berkeley Springs (Bath). Variant names include Berkeley and Warm Springs. Berkeley Springs is a highlight of the Washington Heritage Trail.

    • Berryville (1918-1967) a former independent community in Morgan County, West Virginia. Located south of downtown Berkeley Springs, Berryville sprouted up along U.S. Highway 522 at the beginning of the 20th century; first as a farming community and then as a residential extension of a growing Berkeley Springs. It remains outside the Bath town limits. See map for community location.

    • Brosius Station (1976) — This may actually be a railroad station in Hancock (see information here).

    • Buffalo (Est. 1860)

    • Burnt Factory (1967) an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia, north of Berkeley Springs, is located along Sand Mine Road (County Route 38/1) off Hancock Road (U.S. Highway 522). Variant names included Old Factory and Factory (1935-1967).

    • Campbells (Est. 1920) an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia, along the old Western Maryland Railroad line on the Potomac River. Campbells is accessible by way of Doe Gulley Lane (County Route 18/2) from Doe Gully to its east. See map for location of community (note: you will need to zoom in to see exactly where this community is located).

    • Cherry Run (Est. 1894) a small unincorporated hamlet located along the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad main line on the Potomac River in Morgan County, West Virginia. The community is named for the stream, Cherry Run, that meets the Potomac in its vicinity. It was originally known as Cherry Run Depot (1857-1879) because of the important interchange between the B&O and the Western Maryland Railroad there. Cherry Run is reached by Householder Road (County Route 10) from the west and both Cherry Run Road (County Route 5) and Fulton Road (County Route 1/5) from Martinsburg Road (West Virginia State Route 9) to the south. On the B&O main line, Cherry Run is located between Hancock to its west and Little Georgetown in Berkeley County to its east. This hamlet has also been known as Cherryrun.

    • Daisy — an historical post office located 8 miles east of Magnolia, in operation 1882-1883.

    • Doe Gully (Est. 1896) an unincorporated community along the Potomac River in Morgan County, West Virginia. Located along the old Baltimore and Ohio Railroad where it bisects a bend in the Potomac by way of the Randolph Tunnel, Doe Gully is only accessible by way of Doe Gulley Lane (County Route 18/2) from Orleans Road (County Route 18/1). It is located southwest of Orleans Cross Roads. The Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park crosses the Potomac River onto the West Virginia side to Doe Gulley's west and it is also directly across the river from it. Also known as Doe Gully Run (1875).

    • Dryland — an historical post office operating between 1886 to 1897. Another source shows Dryland existed between (1891-1896). Was located in Allen Township 3.5 miles northeast of Sleepy Creek Bridge.

    • Duckwall is an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia. It is located along Sleepy Creek east of Johnsons Mill.

    • Emmasville (Est. 1860)

    • Ethan — historical post office located 3 miles east of Ridersville. Two sources list different dates for the community and/or the post office (1911-1920) and (1902-1903).

    • Field (1911-1920)

    • Great Cacapon (Est. 1860) an unincorporated hamlet in Morgan County, West Virginia. It got its name from the Cacapon River which empties into the Potomac River to the town's east. Originally known as Cacapon Depot on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad main line when a post office was established here in 1848. In 1876, its name was changed to Great Cacapon to differentiate it from Little Cacapon which was also on the B&O main line. It is located 4 miles down Cacapon Mountain from the Panorama Overlook along Cacapon Road (West Virginia State Route 9) west of Berkeley Springs. Also known as Cacapon. Great Cacapon is one of the highlights along the Washington Heritage Trail.

    • Green Ridge (1920-1935) a now uninhabited railroad community in Morgan County, West Virginia, on the old Baltimore and Ohio Railroad main line where the Western Maryland Railroad crosses the Potomac River from the Stickpike Tunnel in Maryland. Green Ridge was originally known as Baird (1911-1933) and was an operating station on the B&O. Today, it is located within the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park. A stretch of the Western Maryland's Right-of-Way from Green Ridge to Jerome is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Green Ridge is accessible by way of Baird Lane (County Route 12/3) from Hansrote Road (County Route 12/2) at Hansrote.

    • Greenwood is an unincorporated community in southeastern Morgan County, West Virginia.

    • Hancock (Est. 1896), an unincorporated hamlet in Morgan County,West Virginia, it is located off Hancock Road (U.S. Highway 522) on River Road (County Route 1) along the Potomac River north of Berkeley Springs. Originally known as Brosius (1904-1967), its post office's name was changed to Hancock in 1948 to reflect its location on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad main line across the river from Hancock, Maryland. Located along River Road from US 522, Hancock is also accessible by way of Fairview Drive (County Route 2) from Berkeley Springs and Pious Ridge Road (County Route 4) from Ridersville on Martinsburg Road (West Virginia State Route 9). Other variant names include Alpine Depot and Alpine Station. (See listing above for Alpine Depot historical post office.) It is not known if they are the same location.

    • Hansrote (Est. 1911) an unincorporated village in Morgan County, West Virginia, located along the old Baltimore and Ohio Railroad main line on the Potomac River. Hansrote is northeast of Magnolia and southwest of Doe Gully. Stuart Tunnel connected Hansrote and Magnolia by railroad, but today Hansrote is accessible by way of Hansrote Road (County Route 12/2) from Magnolia Road (County Route 12). Also known as Hamsrote and Hansrate.

    • Hard Pan (Est. 1875)

    • Highland Mills (1849-1851)

    • Holton (Est. 1889) is a small unincorporated community in northeastern Morgan County, West Virginia, on Martinsburg Road (West Virginia State Route 9) at its junction with Cherry Run Road (County Route 5). Holton, which had its own post office by the same name in operation between 1889 and 1903, has also been known as Snider.

    • Jerome (1920-1935) is an uninhabited community along the old Baltimore and Ohio Railroad main line in Morgan County, West Virginia, located entirely within the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park on the Potomac River. The community is the site of a stretch of the Western Maryland Railroad Right-of-Way from milepost 126 to milepost 160 listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The train-order office was in use until September 1, 1959. When it was abandoned by the Chessie System in May 1975, the office was not demolished and is one of the few buildings that remain in this community. The community and its station are rumored to have been named for Jerome Bonaparte.

    • Jimtown is an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia, located to the north of Bath (Berkeley Springs) town limits. It is often referred to as a neighborhood of Berkeley Springs and shares that town's zip code. The community has also been known as Jimstown.

    • Johnsons Mill (Est. 1875) is an unincorporated community in eastern Morgan County, West Virginia, on Johnson's Mill Road (County Route 26), centrally located between three other small rural hamlets along Sleepy Creek and was named for the mill that once operated here. Smith Crossroads on Winchester Grade Road (County Route 13) is to its west by way of Autumn Acres Road (County Route 26), New Hope is to its north by way of Spohr's Road (County Route 8), and Duckwall is located to its east on Johnson's Mill Road along the western flanks of Sleepy Creek Mountain. It has also been known as Johnson Mill.

    • Largent is an unincorporated village in both Morgan and Hampshire counties in West Virginia and is located on the Cacapon River, about 18 miles southwest of Berkeley Springs along Cacapon Road (West Virginia State Route 9). Its post office was in operation from 1906 until the 1950's.

    • Lineburg (Est. 1911) an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia, on the western flanks of Sideling Hill on the Turkey Foot Bend of the Potomac River. The community originally served as a station on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.

    • Magnolia (Est. 1879) is an unincorporated hamlet northeast of Paw Paw in Morgan County, West Virginia, on the Potomac River and located along the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad main line, east of where the Western Maryland Railroad crosses the Potomac. As a depot and water station on the B&O, Magnolia has been known by a number of names including Magnolia Dale, Magnolia Vale, and sometimes as Water Station Number 12, where a post office by that name existed for a year, from 1863-1864. Another source has identified a community called Number 12 Water (1867-1894), but it hasn't been confirmed that this is the same community (though it seems likely). The community had its own school, Magnolia School, until it was closed in 1952 in favor of sending students from the Magnolia area to attend the schools in Paw Paw. Magnolia also had its own post office in operation from 1867 to 1868 as Magnolia Vale, and then again in 1871 to 1943 as Magnolia, when it too was closed and the residents of Magnolia were assigned Paw Paw addresses. The community can be accessed by way of Magnolia Road (County Route 12). If using the B&O railroad as a locator, it is between Paw Paw to the southwest and Jerome to the northwest.

    • Miller (1920-1935)

    • Monclavo, an historical post office located 3 miles north of Oakland, in operation from 1860-1879.

    • Morton Grove (Est. 1894) was an historical post office from 1875 to 1887.

    • Mount Trimble is an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia, situated around the crossroads at Michael's Chapel near the confluence of Sleepy Creek and Meadow Branch.

    • Munson, an historical post office located 3 miles east of Ridersville.

    • New Hope (Est. 1933) is an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia, at the confluence of Yellow Spring Run and Sleepy Creek.

    • North Berkeley (Est. 1967) an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia, between Bath (Berkeley Springs) limits and Jimtown. Like Jimstown, North Berkeley is not within the limits of Berkeley Springs proper, but is generally considered a neighborhood of the town. Also known as North Berkeley Springs.

    • Oakland (Est. 1827) is an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia, located along Virginia Line Road (County Route 8,) north of Unger and south of Stotlers Crossroads. Oakland is connected to Valley Road (U.S. Highway 522) by County Route 26 (Oakland and Morton Grove Roads). The community sprouted up as a small farming community in the 19th century and established its own post office and school which were both in operation until the early 20th century.

    • Omps (Est. 1891) is an unincorporated community along U.S. Highway 522 in Morgan County, West Virginia. Omps, which previously had its own post office in operation between 1887 to 1973, is the entrance to the Cacapon State Park. A variant name, known in 1894, was Phonixville.

    • Orleans Cross Roads (Est. 1868) is an unincorporated hamlet on the western flanks of Sideling Hill on the Potomac River in Morgan County, West Virginia. To its south, Rockwell Run, a mountain stream fed by springs, empties into the Potomac. Orleans Cross Roads is along the old Baltimore and Ohio Railroad directly across the river from Little Orleans and is accessible by way of Orleans Road (County Route 18/1) from Cacapon Road (West Virginia State Route 9) via Detour Road (County Route 18). Once the site of a functioning station on the B&O, Orleans Cross Roads also had its own operating post office. The community and post office were often known as Orleans Cross Roads or Orleans Crossroads, while its station was known as Orleans Road Station (1920-1935). The station is still inhabited today and is the site of the historic Orleans Cross Roads Methodist Episcopal Church, built in the 1850s. See this map for Orleans Cross Roads (you will need to 'zoom in' to see the name written on the map.

    • Paw Paw (Est. 1855) is a town in Morgan County, West Virginia, named for the paw paw, a wild fruit which formerly grew in abundance throughout this region. The town is known for the nearby Paw Paw Tunnel (see more information at the Washington Heritage Trail website) and was incorporated by the Circuit Court of Morgan County on April 8, 1891. On George Washington's many trips west, he usually took the Winchester-Cumberland Road, which closely parallels today's County Route 29/51 through Paw Paw. The Potomac River, which lies alongside the old town at one of its bends, was navigated as early as 1750. Travelers heading west often crossed the gap in the mountains here, some settling to farm land along the river. Also known by the alternate spelling of Pawpaw.

    • Peach (Est. 1935)

    • Peach Siding (Est. 1920)

    • Redrock Crossing is an unincorporated community on the Potomac River in Morgan County, West Virginia, on River Road (County Route 1) between the communities of Hancock and Sleepy Creek.

    • Ridersville (Est. 1891) is an unincorporated community between Berkeley Springs and Stohrs Crossroads along Martinsburg Road (West Virginia State Route 9) in Morgan County, West Virginia. It is on Pious Ridge where Pious Ridge Road (County Route 4) and Peter Yost Road (County Route 9/8) intersect with West Virginia 9. Ridersville sprang up in the 19th century as a small farming community along the Martinsburg Road with a general store and its own operating post office. The post office, located 2.5 miles east of Berkeley Springs, closed in 1903. Ridersville was known earlier as Friendship, Rider Store, and Riderville.

    • Ridge is an unincorporated hamlet in Morgan County, West Virginia, along Valley Road (U.S. Highway 522) at its intersection with Fish Hatchery Road (County Route 38/10) near the Frederick County, Virginia, line. Sleepy Creek and Timber Ridge are to its east, with Warm Springs Ridge to its west. Ridge was originally known as Birch Grove, then as Timber Ridge, and then finally as Ridge; it had its own post office, operating from 1860 to 1953.

    • Rock Gap (Est. 1911) is an unincorporated community along Valley Road (U.S. Highway 522) in Morgan County, West Virginia, located between Omps to its south and Berkeley Springs to its north. Situated between Warm Springs Ridge (1,086 feet) to its west and Timber Ridge (1,355 feet) to its east, Rock Gap takes its name from the "Rock Gap" in Warm Spring Ridge, carved out by Rock Gap Run, a tributary stream of Sleepy Creek. It began as a small farming community along Valley Road and had a post office in operation from 1884 to 1907 and again between 1921 and 1925. Residents of Rock Gap currently have a Berkeley Springs address. The community is the site of the old Mount Garfield School and Mount Tabor Church.

    • Rockwell Run (Est. 1911) and Rockwell's Run (Est. 1894) may be the same community, although no other information can be found that it was a community and not a body of water.

    • Roundtop (1894-1935) Historical community — see map for location of where this community was.

    • Roxane (Est. 1911)

    • Shady Grove — see map for community location.

    • Sir Johns Run (Est. 1851) is an unincorporated hamlet at the mouth of Sir Johns Run on the Potomac River in Morgan County, West Virginia, northwest of Berkeley Springs. It is bound to its west by the Widmeyer Wildlife Management Area and to its east by Warm Springs Ridge (1,086 feet). While Sir Johns Run was once an operating station on the old Baltimore and Ohio Railroad main line as an early passenger station for Berkeley Springs, it is primarily a residential community of Berkeley Springs accessible by Sir Johns Run Road (County Route 3). Sir Johns Run had its own post office in operation from 1850 to 1938. Today, the stream and its namesake hamlet are a site on the Washington Heritage Trail. See map for the hamlet's location (you will need to zoom in to see the community's name).

    • Sleepy Creek (Est. 1860) is an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia, on the Potomac River at the mouth of Sleepy Creek. By 1860, Sleepy Creek had a post office and functioned as an important station on the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. The community is located along River Road (County Route 1) east of Hancock and is accessible from Cherry Run to its east by way of Householder Road (County Route 10). See map and zoom in to see Sleepy Creek's location.

    • Smith Crossroads (Est. 1851) is an unincorporated community in Morgan County, West Virginia, at the crossroads of the Winchester Grade Road (County Route 13) with County Routes 26 and 13/1. It has also been known as Smiths Corners, Smiths Cross Roads, and Smiths Forks. See map and zoom in to see the community's location.

    • Snyders — see map for community location. Note: map may be slow to load sometimes.

    • Stohrs Crossroads is an unincorporated community along Martinsburg Road (West Virginia State Route 9) to the west of Sleepy Creek in Morgan County, West Virginia. Originally named Spohrs Cross Roads (Est. 1933) for the Spohr family, its name was eventually changed over the 19th century to "Stohrs." The community is formed by Martinsburg Road's intersection with the Potomac-Virginia Line Road (County Route 8). North of Stohrs Crossroads, County Route 8 is known as Potomac Road and south of the crossroads, as Spohr's Road. When it reaches the Virginia state line at Unger, it is known as Virginia Line Road. See map and zoom in for the location of Stohrs Crossroads.

    • Stotlers Crossroads (Est. 1891) is a small unincorporated hamlet in southeastern Morgan County, West Virginia, situated along Winchester Grade Road (County Route 13) between the South and Middle Forks of Sleepy Creek on the eastern flanks of Highland Ridge (942 feet). A post office was established here in 1885 and took the name of the Stotler family, a prevalent family in the immediate area. Stotlers Crossroads is the home to several historic sites including the Mount Olivet United Methodist Church (1888) and Ambrose Chapel, the latter of which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Stotlers Crossroads is a junction of Winchester Grade Road (County Route 13) with the Virginia Line and Highland Ridge Roads (County Route 8). See map and zoom in for the location of this community.

    • Unger (Est. 1891 or 1896), formerly known as Ungers Store(s) from 1857-1935. Dates are confusing as to actual establishment date, then. Unger is an unincorporated community in southern Morgan County, West Virginia, at the crossroads of Winchester Grade Road (County Route 13) and Unger's Store Road (County Route 11).

    • Woodmont (Est. 1911) is an unincorporated community on the Potomac River in Morgan County, West Virginia, immediately west of the hamlet of Great Cacapon. See map and zoom in for Woodmont's location.

    • Woodrow (1907-1920) is an unincorporated community south of Paw Paw along West Virginia State Route 9 in both Hampshire and Morgan counties, West Virginia. Woodrow is on the eastern flanks of Spring Gap Mountain with Sideling Hill to its east. The USGS reports it had an historical post office (perhaps that is the significance of the years 1907-1920 located from another source).


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      Copyright 2008 Marilyn Gouge
      Last updated 22 May 2008