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Piney

 

Communities of Wetzel County

At this time Piney is just a community name and is referred to as "Up Piney" as if it were a creek. However, the hollow through which the road runs is known as Piney from Route 20 at Galmish to the "Head of the Holler". It is difficult to believe this was once a very busy part of the county. Oil and gas were discovered here early and quickly the area was swarming with transit oil and gas workers such as pumpers, oilers, drillers, teamsters, and etc. These men moved on as new wells were opened and it would seem from the bits of information left behind that they were a bunch of hard-living men who more or less drifted from job to job. Those who were married had left their families back home. They worked hard all day and drank all night, or so it would seem. There were lots of arguments in the saloons and many a man was murdered during a heated argument to be buried in the dead of night and no record ever kept of the deceased nor the murderer, if indeed names were known. It has been learned that some even came with alias. It was a hard, wild life then and Piney came in for it's share.

Piney was never known as a town, as we know the word. There was one general merchandise store owned by A.M. Coulter who also served as the postmaster. The livery stable probably did a big business and was owned by G.H. Clark. The saloon was by far the main attraction, owned by J.L. Headley. Another general store owned by I. Miller and a hotel owned and operated by Mrs. M. Niddle was the extent of the town. Mrs. L.L. Pond operated the telephone office from her home and there were two gas companies with offices. Foreman of the HOPE Gas Company was H.A. Wallace and Southern Penn

Gas and Oil had G.W. Schmuch as their Supt. I believe there was another saloon too owned by C.W. Brown. Total population of Piney in the 1906 Directory was 177. Until a few years ago there was a small building serving as the Post Office for Piney. It was all that remained.

At this time it is a thickly populated area popular with those working in plants along the Ohio River as a residence. Few farm anymore, only for their own use.